Refine Your Search

Topic

Search Results

Magazine

MOMENTUM: MARCH 2020

2020-03-01
Making sense on sensors AutoDrive Challenge team from North Carolina A&T State University gets the most out of its few sensors. Victory at last The first Formula SAE win of Polytechnique Montreal: why keeping it simple and being prepared was the key. Keeping it light Gram by gram, students at Ningxia University carve weight off their SAE Aero Design East plane to win the 2019 competition.
Magazine

Autonomous Vehicle Engineering: March 2018

2018-03-08
Editorial Autonomy's data binge is more like a 5-course meal. Big Data, Big Challenges Cloud services and multiple partnerships are issues the mobility industry grapples with as data implications expand outside the vehicle. Reinventing the Automobile's Design The convergence of electric propulsion, Level 5 autonomy, and the advent of car-free urban zones, is driving new approaches to vehicle design and engineering. When Steering Isn't Steering Anymore High-level autonomy requires new thinking for even basic vehicle controls. Steer-by-wire technology eases some of the complexities automated driving presents-and offers desirable new possibilities. Autonomy and Electrification: A Perfect Match? Combining SAE Level 4/5 functionality and EV platforms brings chal-lenges-and opportunities for cost reduction and systems optimization. Who's Ahead in the Automated-Driving Race? The 2018 Navigant Research Leaderboard study brings interesting insights on the industry's progress.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering: June 2018

2018-06-01
Underway on nuclear power Ford Motor Co. CTO Dr. Ken Washington is driving new approaches to technology innovation—from inside and outside the enterprise. Silicon drives autonomy movement Renesas’ Amrit Vivekanand explains how the software and semiconductors that underlie the industry’s rapid transition are rapidly evolving. Automotive propulsion ‘On a journey’ CTO Jeff Hemphill explains how Schaeffler Group is blending its longstanding mechanical-systems expertise with critical investment in electrification and autonomy. Steeling for reduced mass and higher strength New 3rd-generation AHSS and steel-polymer hybrid tech aim to cut mass by up to 30%—and take a bite out of aluminum’s business. Balancing the rumble and roar Multiphysics simulation is part of the development toolset at Mahindra Two Wheelers, as the Indian motorcycle and scooter maker expands into global markets with larger bikes. Le Mans 2018: can anyone beat Toyota’s hybrids?
Magazine

Autonomous Vehicle Engineering: May 2018

2018-05-03
Editorial Tragedy to Transform AV Testing? Detecting Pedestrians Safety of vulnerable road users is driving new technologies as pedestrian deaths rise worldwide. When Autonomy Underperforms: the Evolving Liability Model As autonomy-related accidents expand, expect legal liability to shift to products rather than people. Seeing Through Fog Fog, rain and snow are big challenges for optical sensors, particularly active systems. Engineers need to understand the impact of fog conditions on cameras and thermal sensors used in AVs. Rethinking Architectures: From Chips to the Cloud New concepts and strategies for controls architectures are emerging as AV boundaries expand and options skyrocket. Cabin Fever As humans do less actual driving, autonomous vehicle interiors will transform radically to provide more creature comforts. Threat Vector: Car Washes! For vehicles with automated-driving sensors, the “cleansing” experience can go too far.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2000-10-01

2000-10-01
Speed is king Motorsports offers automakers a fast way to develop new technologies and quick-thinking engineers. This article explores how DaimlerChrysler, Ford, and General Motors approach motorsports as an engineering tool. Electronics: changing the shape of the automobile The decisions made by the automotive industry the next few years will forever change the shape of the automobile. The electronic technologies to improve fuel economy, increase passenger safety, lower emissions, and improve reliability are evolving quickly, but because of their cost the exact timeframe for their implementation is undecided. Chevrolet Corvette The Z06 is the big news for 2001, the new model having a high-output 5.7-L LS6 V8 developed by GM Powertrain. Innovation meets the mid-size segment The 2001 Chrysler Sebring and Dodge Stratus offer more power, enhanced NVH characteristics, and improved safety. Third-generation M3 The all-new high-performance M3 coupe debuts in North America.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-10-01

2009-10-01
Winning the war for talent The conclusion of AEI's two-part series looks at how industry, academia, and professional groups are working together to close the "knowledge gap" in vehicle electrification. Partnering on infotainment Services are expected to rise as technical collaboration and available bandwith increase. Nissan Leaf The Japanese company first saw the potential of lithium-ion batteries for vehicular use in 1992, and almost two decades later is about to deploy the technology. Honda Insight Developed to be attainable for Gen Y buyers, the 2010 Insight is a major piece in Honda's hybrid-portfolio plans. Heavy-duty issues Top industry insiders provide their perspectives on crtical issues such as sustainability, workforce development, and future growth at this year's Commercial Vehicle Engineering Congress and Exhibition.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2000-09-01

2000-09-01
Improving lightweight vehicle dynamics Bosch engineers used numerical simulation to evaluate vehicle concepts using variable semi-active components, tire specifications, and suspension spring rates. Dr. Reitzle's prescription for Jaguar His vision for the brand is to "use top-level technology and do so in a very emotional way." Dual-voltage power networks Lear Automotive EEDS has developed an innovative electrical and electronic architecture to handle future high-power requirements in vehicles. New door closure concepts Bosch and Temic engineers are developing technologies for passive entry, vehicle immobilization, and remote control. TwinCAN: one module for two nodes The ability to use one module to control two CAN nodes provides benefits including reduced hardware and software requirements, improved functionality, and lower CPU load, according to Infineon researchers.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-09-01

2009-09-01
A sense of safety Engineers are looking to combine radars of different ranges, cameras, and sophisticated controls to prevent collisions. Priming the green-car pump In a "perfect storm of opportunity," billions of dollars in federal funding are flowing toward next-generation, made-in-the-U.S. hybrid and electric-vehicle technology. Re-engineering the auto engineer The electrification of the vehicle is boosting demand for engineers with new competencies and skill sets. In Part 1 of this special two-part feature series, AEI examines why the industry needs to encourage and develop its most critical resource-people. Aerodynamics soar Automakers toil to minimize drag and maximize fuel economy.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-09-01

2006-09-01
Systems drive safety Engineers are using a holistic approach to design safer vehicles by adding function and integrating multiple subsystems. The gas in greener Biodiesels promise to help reduce petroleum consumption and CO2 emissions, but much of the potential depends on production and infrastructure investment. Good vibrations Instead of excising all noise, vibration, and harshness, engineers are focusing more on making specific sounds and feedback "fit" a vehicle. SAE Commercial Vehicle Congress Preview International Truck and Engine executives head the charge for "positive industry change" at SAE's third Congress for the on- and off-highway communities.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-09-01

2003-09-01
No hands with Bluetooth A major effort is underway to implement the wireless specification in cars and cell phones to reduce driver distraction. Sensors proliferate The boom is light on wireless, heavy on intelligence. Water and heat in the fuel-cell balance Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Millenium Cell, and DaimlerChrysler are working on a sodium borohydride system tha thas the potential to meet FreedomCAR's weight-percent hydrogen-storage targets. Far East optimism Asia's Big Three--Toyota, Honda, and Nissan-- relied to a large extent on their global presence to post strong profits in 2002 as they and other Far East automakers prepare for an upswing in their economies. Models of choice Seven of the eight Japanese passenger car/light truck manufacturers offer various configurations of compacts, which are taking off in Asia.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-04-01

2001-04-01
E-business: the new game in town With the initial formation of Covisint in February 2000, and with other online ventures established over the past couple of years, the automotive industry has thrown its chips into the B2B e-commerce game. The following is an update on how the industry is faring now that its cards are on the table. Simulation: redefining the development process Just as companies sought to shorten the development cycle with intergrated product teams, they do so again with up-front computer-aided analysis and simulation. New connections for automobiles Thanks to innovative technologies and applications, flexible circuitry is helping drive new trends, such as modularity, in automotive design, according to Sheldahl. NAIAS highlights: production Since becoming an international event in 1989, the North American International Auto Show in Detroit has hosted 620 North American and worldwide vehicle introductions.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-04-01

2009-04-01
A winning iQ SAE members voted Toyota's new microcar the Best Engineering Vehicle for 2009. The iQ shows its smarts with brilliant packaging, city-friendly efficiency, and superb overall execution. Diesel or gasoline hybrids? As the global financial crisis deepens, companies must hone their R&D programs and attempt to choose winning technologies with the European OEMs, in particular, debating their hybrid strategies. Engine upgrade With displacements headed downward but output expectations undiminished, evolving sensor technologies and strategies are helping to give a boost to engine performance, efficiency, and emissions. Smooth riding ahead Integration and continuous development are the key words as chassis dynamics head into this century's second decade. Building in smarter materials Technologies that can automatically respond to changing conditions are expected to show up increasingly in future automobiles.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2008-04-01

2008-04-01
LED-ing the way Headlamps using low-power semiconductors called light-emitting diodes have moved from concept to reality with recent production firsts, but challenges remain in taking the technology mainstream. High-value hybrids The drive to reduce hybrid vehicle cost while boosting efficiency has brought new attention to stop-start and mild-hybrid systems. Sustainability on a small scale Nanotechnology is a new battleground for fighting emissions and making vehicles more environmentally friendly. Sensors inside Suppliers are helping OEMs enhance interior comfort and convenience. CO2: The next big challenge This roundup of recent engineering developments highlights that cutting emissions does not have to mean cutting the fun. Clearing the air Emissions and fuel-efficiency issues emerge collectively as the top concern among engineers attending this year's SAE World Congress.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-04-01

2006-04-01
Lighting the way Exterior lighting systems are not just contributing to safety, they are also changing cars' styling. Sensing a change As sensor use grows, providing input for all sorts of functions, engineers are responding to the design challenges through standardization and shared use of signal output. Attacking hybrid cost Hybrid-electric vehicle costs must be slashed significantly for the technology to become mainstream. HEV developers reveal many routes in the cost-reduction crusade. Engineering with the enemy In a program devoid of bloodshed, General Motors and Ford codeveloped a new six-speed automatic that is key to both companies' future vehicle plans. The program managers explain why they'd eagerly do it again. Drivetrain advances Japan's leading companies have focused development on reducing size, mass, and cost.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2008-08-01

2008-08-01
Back to the high-power future Executive Vice President Masatami Takimoto and other officials are re-engineering Toyota, borrowing elements of the past to tackle 21st-century environmental changes. Racing to green mobility The President of Honda R&D, Masaaki Kato, hopes to harness the company's "racing spirit" to research and develop innovative methods to reduce the CO2 emissions of its products. Charging ahead Nissan's Senior Vice President, Minoru Shinohara, explains the battery technology that will allow feasible electric cars, while not forgetting to mention the GT-R supercar. Market Genesis Hyundai-Kia R&D Center Chief Hyun-Soon Lee has added the top market-research job at the company as it tries to quickly add more value to its products with new technologies and features. China goes shiftless Suppliers hope to capitalize on the future gold mine for automatic transmissions by working with OEMs on high-tech but low-cost solutions.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-08-01

2006-08-01
Seats of power Car users are sitting on more advanced features than ever before, but increasing demands for "comfort" and other considerations have focused industry brainpower on slimmer seat designs, new trim materials, and innovative technology solutions. Big changes for powertrain control Electronics innovations are behind many of the advances in hybrid, diesel, and conventional gasoline engines. Plastic on the outside For many new vehicles, light weight is paramount, and so too is eye-catching design. That's why plastic body panels will become more prevalent. Toyota powers ahead The company's powertrain strategy follows Toyota President Watanabe's dream that a Toyota car be able to cross the American continent with no refueling while cleansing the atmosphere as it travels. The Honda way In the pipeline are a "dedicated hybrid car for family use," a super-clean diesel that meets U.S.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-08-01

2005-08-01
Broadening horizons Japanese manufacturing continue to diversify, investing in the launch of a domestic premium brand, updating an iconic sports car, and developing a variety of safer micro cars that are gaining popularity all over the world. Today for tomorrow Japanese automotive manufacturers are researching new engine technologies to improve power, efficiency, and emissions. Continental Flying Spur Bentley engineers sought "no compromises" in creating their new GT-based 312-km/h (194-mph) sedan. Material issue Automakers apply advanced materials to stem the rising tide of weight from increasing safety and convenience features. Testing trends This special edition of Testing & Simulation focuses on some of the more innovative technologies designed to satisfy the industry's demanding testing needs. Trading in a socket wrench for a software patch The good old days of taking your car to the repair shop down the street and hoping for the best as Mr.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2007-08-01

2007-08-01
Toyota rationalizes IMV The Executive Chief Engineer in charge of the broad range of multipurpose vehicles for developing markets discusses local optimization of one global vehicle architecture. Honda builds a better FCX The recently revealed concept car previews the ambitious and radically new fuel-cell-powered car that the company will launch and lease in 2008 in the U.S. and Japan. Denso turns up the heat Japan's largest supplier is developing environmentally friendly products, such as its flagship HVAC systems to make customer vehicles cooler but more efficient. Sitting pretty Aesthetics merge with safety and ergonomics in that "simple" yet essential automotive system: the seat. Shifting forward Faster processors, enhanced sensors yield better transmissions with smoother gear changes. Finishing strong Combining high strength with formability, today's new steels support development of lighter, more fuel-efficient vehicles--without compromising safety, cost, or performance.
Magazine

JUL/AUG 2013 AUTO DESIGN

2013-08-01
Out of thin air Thomas Korn, Alset Global's VP of product development and technology, talks to Ian Adcock on the company's pioneering hydrogen dual fuel system Quest for the missing link Modelling tyre behaviour and how that influences vehicle dynamics is a key factor in developing ride and handling, as Ian Adcock discovers Emissions mission: 2020 vision Variable valve timing for petrol engines is everywhere to be seen. So are we ready to go beyond that yet? Tony Lewin finds out
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2007-12-01

2007-12-01
Tokyo concepts As usual the highly imaginative group of concepts on display at the 2007 Tokyo Motor Show, held in late October at the Makuhari Messe, was unique among the year's auto shows. Some were tall, many were boxy, and a few very un-car-like, but most were focused on low emissions and consumption. Style vs. strength Software helps designers and body engineers get the most in looks and safety. Conceiving alternatives Recent concept cars explore solutions to fuel-supply and emissions concerns. 2007 technology in rearview AEI editors look back at some of the most significant engineering and innovation stories of the past year.
X