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Automotive Engineering: June 2018

2018-06-01
Underway on nuclear power Ford Motor Co. CTO Dr. Ken Washington is driving new approaches to technology innovation—from inside and outside the enterprise. Silicon drives autonomy movement Renesas’ Amrit Vivekanand explains how the software and semiconductors that underlie the industry’s rapid transition are rapidly evolving. Automotive propulsion ‘On a journey’ CTO Jeff Hemphill explains how Schaeffler Group is blending its longstanding mechanical-systems expertise with critical investment in electrification and autonomy. Steeling for reduced mass and higher strength New 3rd-generation AHSS and steel-polymer hybrid tech aim to cut mass by up to 30%—and take a bite out of aluminum’s business. Balancing the rumble and roar Multiphysics simulation is part of the development toolset at Mahindra Two Wheelers, as the Indian motorcycle and scooter maker expands into global markets with larger bikes. Le Mans 2018: can anyone beat Toyota’s hybrids?
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-10-01

2001-10-01
Semiconductors flex their muscles Makers of semiconductors see the automotive market as a prime opportunity for growth. The first part of this article looks at this growth from the perspective of semiconductor industry leader Motorola. The second part highlights some recent semiconductor product introductions. 2002 supplier technology As automakers increase outsourcing, suppliers are taking on more responsibility for developing increasingly complex systems and components. This special edition of Tech Briefs highlights some of the many supplier contributions to 2002 passenger cars. Vision sensors and the intelligent vehicle Advancements in CMOS imaging sensors have enabled Delphi engineers to adapt low-cost, high-quality cameras for a variety of applications in integrated safety systems. The reborn Thunderbird Taking cues from the 1955 model, the 2002 car benefited from Ford's modern platform and systems engineering as well as C3P computer modeling techniques.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2007-10-01

2007-10-01
After CD, what's next? Storing music in cars remains fraught with many engineering considerations as infotainment systems move into the next generation. Chevrolet Malibu General Motors has enhanced its midsize architecture for a more refined and luxurious ownership experience. Chrysler minivans Chrysler's family haulers feature a new look and more interior flexibility to go with a host of technology upgrades. Jaguar XF The company's middle sedan is updated with a 21st century interpretation of traditional standards. BMW M3 The high-performance version of the 3 Series coupe gets V8 power, other significant upgrades. Honda Accord The eighth generation of Honda's popular sedan offers more space, power, and safety. Fiat 500 The new car's styling harks back to the original of over 70 years ago, but it employs modern technology and shares a platform with the forthcoming Ford Ka replacement.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-09-01

2001-09-01
Trends in advanced chassis control Motorola vehicle system developers examine the state-of-the-art microprocessor and other electronic technologies driving the development of advanced braking, steering, suspension control, and collision warning/avoidance systems. Wheel design and engineering Consumer demand is driving the automakers' move to large-diameter, shiny, alloy wheels. Telematics and the digital car As development of new telematics products and services gain speed, OEMS, suppliers, and other players in the automotive industry are using simulators as a tool to gain greater understanding of driver distraction. NisSun Rising Nissan is back, according to President and COO Carlo Hosn, thanks to a revised product development structure that makes better use of employees and technology. Back to the future for Ford manufacturing The Vice President of Vehicle Operations said the company's goal is raw materials to finished goods in one day.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2008-09-01

2008-09-01
Looking forward to safer highways New camera technologies, along with better algorithms and software, are enabling the move to active-safety systems that warn and then take control of vehicles in dangerous situations. Fuel-cell futures Eager to find alternative-propulsion solutions, automakers are betting that renewed emphasis on fuel-cell vehicles will pay off in the long run, with the latest examples aiming to prove higher-volume production feasibility. Consensus building ojn refrigerant type The hydrofluoro-olefin refrigerant HFO-1234yf has emerged as Europe's favored R-134a replacement, but some prefer R-744. Strengthening the link through software The next generation of simulation tools could help better synchronize manufacturing engineering and product design.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-09-01

2006-09-01
Systems drive safety Engineers are using a holistic approach to design safer vehicles by adding function and integrating multiple subsystems. The gas in greener Biodiesels promise to help reduce petroleum consumption and CO2 emissions, but much of the potential depends on production and infrastructure investment. Good vibrations Instead of excising all noise, vibration, and harshness, engineers are focusing more on making specific sounds and feedback "fit" a vehicle. SAE Commercial Vehicle Congress Preview International Truck and Engine executives head the charge for "positive industry change" at SAE's third Congress for the on- and off-highway communities.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-04-01

2005-04-01
Throwing their weight around Vehicle mass took a back seat to aesthetics, functionality, and performance when automaker executives discussed the merits of their new products at the North American International Auto Show. Safety drives sensor growth New semiconductor technologies provide more data in a wide range of systems. Wireless gains support Wi-Fi is seen as the link between consumer electronics and cars. Supply chain migration As automakers ramp up operations in China, suppliers must consider the challenges as well as the opportunities of supporting them there. Automakers focus on soft money The huge surge in software makes it a focus for cost cutting. Chevrolet Corvette: AEI's Best Engineered Vehicle for 2005. The sixth-generation car delivers even more performance value than its predecessor, and adds greater comfort and convenience into the mix.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-08-01

2006-08-01
Seats of power Car users are sitting on more advanced features than ever before, but increasing demands for "comfort" and other considerations have focused industry brainpower on slimmer seat designs, new trim materials, and innovative technology solutions. Big changes for powertrain control Electronics innovations are behind many of the advances in hybrid, diesel, and conventional gasoline engines. Plastic on the outside For many new vehicles, light weight is paramount, and so too is eye-catching design. That's why plastic body panels will become more prevalent. Toyota powers ahead The company's powertrain strategy follows Toyota President Watanabe's dream that a Toyota car be able to cross the American continent with no refueling while cleansing the atmosphere as it travels. The Honda way In the pipeline are a "dedicated hybrid car for family use," a super-clean diesel that meets U.S.
Magazine

MAY 2010 AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN

2010-05-01
Spotlight on Ulrik Grape Ulrik Grape, president Ener1 Europe, gives Ian Adcock an insight into the future of EVs Technological Tour De Force This year's SAE World Congress was a showcase for advanced technologies. We highlight those that impressed most Wankel's new lease of life Once dismissed for its oil consumption and high wear rates, Wankel rotary engines could be reborn in a range extender, as Ian Adcock discovers
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2008-12-01

2008-12-01
Bodybuilding 101 The latest designs are pumped up with flagrant use of performance-enhancing substances, such as boron steel, for maximum strength and safety. Prize-winning plastics Lower cost, lighter weight solutions highlight the 2008 SPE Automotive Innovation awards. Mean and green More than a few companies at last month's SEMA Show heralded the eco-friendly side of their products just as highly as the performance side. Setting the standards Automakers along with their supplier partners are now embracing many interfaces and protocols to enable compatibility with consumer electronics devices as well as other advances. Readers' choice: Top technology stories of the year The editors look back at some of the past year's most significant engineering and innovation articles according to readers of Automotive Engineering International and AEI Online. Green victory? The motorsports community contemplates winning races while leaving behind the smallest environmental footprint.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-12-01

2009-12-01
Lithium battery bonanza Lithium battery technology is finally making its way to production hybrids and planned EVs, but improvements are needed. Reader's choice: Top technology stories of 2009 The editors look back at the past year's most significant articles according to readers of Automotive Engineering International, AEI Online, and Truck & Bus Engineering Online. Sending a message Vehicle-to-vehicle communications can improve safety, but telematics may ultimately provide more impact.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-01-01

2001-01-01
Ford's new four The largest engine development program in company history will lead to at least 200 applications, starting with the new Mondeo's Duratec HE and replacement of its existing cast-iron-block four-cylinders with higher aluminum content powerplants. GM Powertrain's new inline six for SUV's For the first time in nearly two decades, three new General Motors vehicles will feature an inline six-cylinder engine developed by GM Powertrain. Fuel-stratified injection from VW Though gasoline direct-injection technology is being introduced in the Lupo FSI, VW says it easily can be adapted for high-volume use in larger vehicles such as the Polo and Golf. LS6 for Z06 The latest high-performance Corvette engine features improved breathing, new pistons, an increased compression ratio, and a new high-profile camshaft.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-11-01

2009-11-01
Software shifts into automatic mode Automatic code generation is speeding up development and helping to improve automotive system reliability. Coming out party Plastics abound inside vehicles, but they are increasingly finding new applications outside the cockpit thanks to a heavy push for lightweight solutions. Cutting emissions down to size While the long-term future may deliver an efficient alternative to the internal-combustion engine, a few UK-led projects are tackling short-to medium-term solutions for improving engine-out emissions and efficiency of gasoline and diesel engines.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-10-01

2006-10-01
Like a rolling home Suppliers are helping automakers engineer vehicles that allow passengers to bring along the comforts of home. Focusing on distraction An explosion of new features, functions poses challenges for safety. Performance goes green With record-high fuel prices and CO2 concerns providing the impetus, automakers are developing more fun-to-drive cars with an eye towards efficiency. GM re-engineers pickips More refined ride, higher-quality interiors, and greater efficiency are some of the highlights of the 2007 models. Jeep takes on tough terrain For 2007, the brand's iconic Wrangler is engineered to be more rugged off-road and more refined on it. Audi updates TT theme The second-generation rendition is bigger, more powerful, and uses a subtle metals mix and match. Vantage: as Aston to the core A common platform strategy is a vital element of the company's design and manufacturing flexibility.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-10-01

2003-10-01
Body control electronics shapes up The electronics revolution is advancing unabated in vehicle and body control, but the addition of features ranging from electronic power steering to tire pressure monitoring poses numerous challenges for electronics engineers. Telematics comes back on line Interfaces will play a huge role in expected growth. Cadillac XLR The new luxury roadster, designed to go head-to-head with models from Mercedes-Benz, Jaguar, and Lexus, uses an all-new 4.6-L Northstar V8 and innovative features such as adaptive cruise control, Magnetic Ride Control, and keyless access. 2005 Ford GT The company's image vehicle helped develop engineering skills in the race to production. Chrysler Pacifica Safety and infotainment features abound in the upscale 2004 sports tourer. 5 Series changes shape BMW adopted an aluminum/steel hybrid body in the interests of light weight and even weight distribution, and worked with ZF Lenksysteme to introduce active steering.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-08-01

2009-08-01
Toyota punches innovations pedal From hybrids to robots, Toyota promises new ways of thinking to produce new and better products. Hyundai dreams As part of an internal competition, Hyundai designers let their minds wander through time, space, and perhaps some new dimension to conjure concepts that seem outlandish today. Maza fired up about internal combustion There is room in the market for hybrids and all-electric vehicles, but Mazda believes that internal-combustion engine offers the biggest bang for the buck. Helping hands Engineering consulting service providers expect to help OEMs meet greater fuel efficiency and tighter emissions standards. The upside ofdownsizing Hybrid powertrains are undergoing huge changes as successive generations emerge, increasing efficiency and offering better performance, with component sizes shrinking as engineers make changes that address cost.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2002-12-01

2002-12-01
Bending light Lighting technology is becoming more intelligent and adaptive as OEMs and suppliers develop systems that are more integrated into vehicle electronics systems for greater performance and safety. Top technologies of the year The world's automakers and suppliers were busy in 2002 equipping production vehicles with significant new technology. The editors review some of those significant "game changing" innovations for the past model year. Testing on the move Advances in mobile data acquisition, such as those from HBM, have helped engineers move the testing of vehicles from the laboratory to the road. Producing an all-new powertrain Ford and International each revamped a plant to build a new powertrain for Ford's super-duty trucks and Excursion sport utility vehicle. Making plastic parts New ways of forming plastics for automotive components were revealed at an annual contest sponsored by the Society of Plastics Engineers.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-12-01

2003-12-01
Concepts from 2003 Tokyo Motor Show Environmental, safety, and information technology were strongly emphasized in an impressive array of fuel-cell, hybrid, and pure electric concept cars. LEDs shine on The lighting technology's compact size, power, and durability excite designers who still long for flexibility in interior and exterior styling. GM, software, and electronics At its annual media preview of new models, the company demonstrated how its technology investments will pay off in more features, for more people, in more market segments. Plastics roll into new territory From structural members to Class A surfaces, plastics continue to find increasingly broad application in the automotive industry. 2003 technology in review AEI editors look back at some of the most significant production-intent innovations introduced over the past year. Forging ahead in metal forming Crude though the means may have been, humans began making and shaping metal several millenia ago.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2000-08-01

2000-08-01
The battle of the metals Engineers continue to improve the properties of metal and evolve manufacturing technologies to enable metals to maintain, or achieve more of, a competitive presence in vehicles. Global Concepts This second of two parts reviews some of the more significant vehicles from past year's motor shows and showcases trends in design and technology from the world's auotmakers. Good Vibrations AEI takes a look at what some companies are doing to improve vehicle NVH. Asia after the storm This final segment of AEI's three-part look at doing business in the digital age focuses on suppliers and OEMs in Asia. Producing fully dense PM parts A new process from PM Krupp Technologies Inc., F2, is suitable for producing fully dense parts that are too expensive to machine or cast, or that require the high strength, hardness, and durablity that conventional (low-density) powder metal cannot provide.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-08-01

2003-08-01
Appetite for cars growing in China Automakers and suppliers the world over are scrambling to establish or expland manufacturing operations in China as income growth spurs a rapid rise in car sales. "Lighting" the way for bodies Alcan says the most common alternative metal for body applications, aluminum, can be used as a stand-alone material or integrated with steel. Controlling noise, vibration, and harshness Vehicle manufacturers and their suppliers are finding ways to deliver greater passenger comfort in the early stages of design. Why diesels, why now? Participants at the first SAE Executive Management Briefing discuss the possibilities and technical challenges for diesel engines in U.S. passenger vehicles. Virtual powertrain, real results As powertrain control systems require more complex validation testing in less time, Ford is teaming with Concurrent Computer to develop a HIL simulation system that tests real control hardware in the virtual world.
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