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Automotive Engineering: June 2018

2018-06-01
Underway on nuclear power Ford Motor Co. CTO Dr. Ken Washington is driving new approaches to technology innovation—from inside and outside the enterprise. Silicon drives autonomy movement Renesas’ Amrit Vivekanand explains how the software and semiconductors that underlie the industry’s rapid transition are rapidly evolving. Automotive propulsion ‘On a journey’ CTO Jeff Hemphill explains how Schaeffler Group is blending its longstanding mechanical-systems expertise with critical investment in electrification and autonomy. Steeling for reduced mass and higher strength New 3rd-generation AHSS and steel-polymer hybrid tech aim to cut mass by up to 30%—and take a bite out of aluminum’s business. Balancing the rumble and roar Multiphysics simulation is part of the development toolset at Mahindra Two Wheelers, as the Indian motorcycle and scooter maker expands into global markets with larger bikes. Le Mans 2018: can anyone beat Toyota’s hybrids?
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-10-01

2001-10-01
Semiconductors flex their muscles Makers of semiconductors see the automotive market as a prime opportunity for growth. The first part of this article looks at this growth from the perspective of semiconductor industry leader Motorola. The second part highlights some recent semiconductor product introductions. 2002 supplier technology As automakers increase outsourcing, suppliers are taking on more responsibility for developing increasingly complex systems and components. This special edition of Tech Briefs highlights some of the many supplier contributions to 2002 passenger cars. Vision sensors and the intelligent vehicle Advancements in CMOS imaging sensors have enabled Delphi engineers to adapt low-cost, high-quality cameras for a variety of applications in integrated safety systems. The reborn Thunderbird Taking cues from the 1955 model, the 2002 car benefited from Ford's modern platform and systems engineering as well as C3P computer modeling techniques.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2007-10-01

2007-10-01
After CD, what's next? Storing music in cars remains fraught with many engineering considerations as infotainment systems move into the next generation. Chevrolet Malibu General Motors has enhanced its midsize architecture for a more refined and luxurious ownership experience. Chrysler minivans Chrysler's family haulers feature a new look and more interior flexibility to go with a host of technology upgrades. Jaguar XF The company's middle sedan is updated with a 21st century interpretation of traditional standards. BMW M3 The high-performance version of the 3 Series coupe gets V8 power, other significant upgrades. Honda Accord The eighth generation of Honda's popular sedan offers more space, power, and safety. Fiat 500 The new car's styling harks back to the original of over 70 years ago, but it employs modern technology and shares a platform with the forthcoming Ford Ka replacement.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-09-01

2001-09-01
Trends in advanced chassis control Motorola vehicle system developers examine the state-of-the-art microprocessor and other electronic technologies driving the development of advanced braking, steering, suspension control, and collision warning/avoidance systems. Wheel design and engineering Consumer demand is driving the automakers' move to large-diameter, shiny, alloy wheels. Telematics and the digital car As development of new telematics products and services gain speed, OEMS, suppliers, and other players in the automotive industry are using simulators as a tool to gain greater understanding of driver distraction. NisSun Rising Nissan is back, according to President and COO Carlo Hosn, thanks to a revised product development structure that makes better use of employees and technology. Back to the future for Ford manufacturing The Vice President of Vehicle Operations said the company's goal is raw materials to finished goods in one day.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2002-09-01

2002-09-01
Fuel-cell commercialization The technology race is on to market the next revolution in automotive propulsion, with the first vehicles in limited quantities coming from Toyota and Honda by the end of the year. Telematics technology trends Analysts at the Telematics Research Group explain the computer, communications, and automotive electronic component advancements that will influence systems development. No end in sight to electronics' growth The biennial Convergence conference on transportation electronics, hosted by DaimlerChrysler, will explore the interplay of electronics with mechanical and other systems to improve vehicle safety, performance, and convenience. Making contacts Engineers at AMI DODUCO reveal their latest research and developments on critical automotive electrical contact reliability.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2008-09-01

2008-09-01
Looking forward to safer highways New camera technologies, along with better algorithms and software, are enabling the move to active-safety systems that warn and then take control of vehicles in dangerous situations. Fuel-cell futures Eager to find alternative-propulsion solutions, automakers are betting that renewed emphasis on fuel-cell vehicles will pay off in the long run, with the latest examples aiming to prove higher-volume production feasibility. Consensus building ojn refrigerant type The hydrofluoro-olefin refrigerant HFO-1234yf has emerged as Europe's favored R-134a replacement, but some prefer R-744. Strengthening the link through software The next generation of simulation tools could help better synchronize manufacturing engineering and product design.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2007-09-01

2007-09-01
Avoiding crashes through engineering Sensor fusion and FlexRay adoption pose big challenges for active-safety systems developers. Sounds of silence NVH analysis comes into the spotlight as traditional targets are addressed and new trouble spots are uncovered. Fuel cells power up As the alternative-propulsion technology moves from lab to limited production, car makers are looking for new design solutions and materials to reduce costs.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-09-01

2006-09-01
Systems drive safety Engineers are using a holistic approach to design safer vehicles by adding function and integrating multiple subsystems. The gas in greener Biodiesels promise to help reduce petroleum consumption and CO2 emissions, but much of the potential depends on production and infrastructure investment. Good vibrations Instead of excising all noise, vibration, and harshness, engineers are focusing more on making specific sounds and feedback "fit" a vehicle. SAE Commercial Vehicle Congress Preview International Truck and Engine executives head the charge for "positive industry change" at SAE's third Congress for the on- and off-highway communities.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-09-01

2003-09-01
No hands with Bluetooth A major effort is underway to implement the wireless specification in cars and cell phones to reduce driver distraction. Sensors proliferate The boom is light on wireless, heavy on intelligence. Water and heat in the fuel-cell balance Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Millenium Cell, and DaimlerChrysler are working on a sodium borohydride system tha thas the potential to meet FreedomCAR's weight-percent hydrogen-storage targets. Far East optimism Asia's Big Three--Toyota, Honda, and Nissan-- relied to a large extent on their global presence to post strong profits in 2002 as they and other Far East automakers prepare for an upswing in their economies. Models of choice Seven of the eight Japanese passenger car/light truck manufacturers offer various configurations of compacts, which are taking off in Asia.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-04-01

2001-04-01
E-business: the new game in town With the initial formation of Covisint in February 2000, and with other online ventures established over the past couple of years, the automotive industry has thrown its chips into the B2B e-commerce game. The following is an update on how the industry is faring now that its cards are on the table. Simulation: redefining the development process Just as companies sought to shorten the development cycle with intergrated product teams, they do so again with up-front computer-aided analysis and simulation. New connections for automobiles Thanks to innovative technologies and applications, flexible circuitry is helping drive new trends, such as modularity, in automotive design, according to Sheldahl. NAIAS highlights: production Since becoming an international event in 1989, the North American International Auto Show in Detroit has hosted 620 North American and worldwide vehicle introductions.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-04-01

2005-04-01
Throwing their weight around Vehicle mass took a back seat to aesthetics, functionality, and performance when automaker executives discussed the merits of their new products at the North American International Auto Show. Safety drives sensor growth New semiconductor technologies provide more data in a wide range of systems. Wireless gains support Wi-Fi is seen as the link between consumer electronics and cars. Supply chain migration As automakers ramp up operations in China, suppliers must consider the challenges as well as the opportunities of supporting them there. Automakers focus on soft money The huge surge in software makes it a focus for cost cutting. Chevrolet Corvette: AEI's Best Engineered Vehicle for 2005. The sixth-generation car delivers even more performance value than its predecessor, and adds greater comfort and convenience into the mix.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-08-01

2006-08-01
Seats of power Car users are sitting on more advanced features than ever before, but increasing demands for "comfort" and other considerations have focused industry brainpower on slimmer seat designs, new trim materials, and innovative technology solutions. Big changes for powertrain control Electronics innovations are behind many of the advances in hybrid, diesel, and conventional gasoline engines. Plastic on the outside For many new vehicles, light weight is paramount, and so too is eye-catching design. That's why plastic body panels will become more prevalent. Toyota powers ahead The company's powertrain strategy follows Toyota President Watanabe's dream that a Toyota car be able to cross the American continent with no refueling while cleansing the atmosphere as it travels. The Honda way In the pipeline are a "dedicated hybrid car for family use," a super-clean diesel that meets U.S.
Magazine

MAY 2010 AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN

2010-05-01
Spotlight on Ulrik Grape Ulrik Grape, president Ener1 Europe, gives Ian Adcock an insight into the future of EVs Technological Tour De Force This year's SAE World Congress was a showcase for advanced technologies. We highlight those that impressed most Wankel's new lease of life Once dismissed for its oil consumption and high wear rates, Wankel rotary engines could be reborn in a range extender, as Ian Adcock discovers
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2008-12-01

2008-12-01
Bodybuilding 101 The latest designs are pumped up with flagrant use of performance-enhancing substances, such as boron steel, for maximum strength and safety. Prize-winning plastics Lower cost, lighter weight solutions highlight the 2008 SPE Automotive Innovation awards. Mean and green More than a few companies at last month's SEMA Show heralded the eco-friendly side of their products just as highly as the performance side. Setting the standards Automakers along with their supplier partners are now embracing many interfaces and protocols to enable compatibility with consumer electronics devices as well as other advances. Readers' choice: Top technology stories of the year The editors look back at some of the past year's most significant engineering and innovation articles according to readers of Automotive Engineering International and AEI Online. Green victory? The motorsports community contemplates winning races while leaving behind the smallest environmental footprint.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-12-01

2009-12-01
Lithium battery bonanza Lithium battery technology is finally making its way to production hybrids and planned EVs, but improvements are needed. Reader's choice: Top technology stories of 2009 The editors look back at the past year's most significant articles according to readers of Automotive Engineering International, AEI Online, and Truck & Bus Engineering Online. Sending a message Vehicle-to-vehicle communications can improve safety, but telematics may ultimately provide more impact.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-01-01

2001-01-01
Ford's new four The largest engine development program in company history will lead to at least 200 applications, starting with the new Mondeo's Duratec HE and replacement of its existing cast-iron-block four-cylinders with higher aluminum content powerplants. GM Powertrain's new inline six for SUV's For the first time in nearly two decades, three new General Motors vehicles will feature an inline six-cylinder engine developed by GM Powertrain. Fuel-stratified injection from VW Though gasoline direct-injection technology is being introduced in the Lupo FSI, VW says it easily can be adapted for high-volume use in larger vehicles such as the Polo and Golf. LS6 for Z06 The latest high-performance Corvette engine features improved breathing, new pistons, an increased compression ratio, and a new high-profile camshaft.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2002-01-01

2002-01-01
Spark-ignition engine trends In the face of growing competition from diesels and alternative power sources, some of the latest prototype and production gasoline-fueled engines show how continued engineering development is meeting demands for more power, reduced fuel consumption and emissions, and more efficient packaging. Expanding supplier capabilities through consolidation The pace of consolidation in the automotive industry has slowed somewhat, but its importance has not diminished. Raymond A. Morris named SAE Executive Vice President THe 27-year SAE veteran promises to focus on the needs of the customer and to become better acquainted with the Detroit automotive industry.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-01-01

2003-01-01
Engine strategies and engineering Top powertrain executives from DaimlerChrysler and General Motors talk about their companies' views and plans for the future. Greater performance, better efficiency, and reduced emissions are the highlights of the latest crop of internal combustion engines from their companies and others. Educating engineers The automotive and academic worlds are teaming to ensure that the industry's future is full of qualified engineering talent. OEM production systems enable flexibility Building multiple models on the same production line is a Japanese innovation--one that U.S. automakers are hurrying to implement. Executives abound at SAE 2003 World Congress Re-tooled to increase the presence of OEMs and to make it easier for attendees to get the information they need, this year's Congress offers a great return on investment for engineers and related automotive industry professionals who spend time in Detroit's Cobo Center March 3-6.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2002-11-01

2002-11-01
Tech Highlights: 2002 Mondial de L'Automobile European editor Stuart Birch gives a run down of some of the significant vehicle and technology debuts at the Paris Motor Show, beginning with the French automakers. Supply-chain trends With increased responsibility for modules and warranties, automotive suppliers are finding innovative ways to manage their supply chains. Sports car racing technology Le Mans series race car engineering reach a high-water mark in 2002, but will likely recede in 2003. Innovation at DaimlerChrysler Chairman and CEO Jurgen Schrempp believes that in the next 15 years, car technology and design will move ahead more rapidly than at any time in the past half century--and that almost everything except the basic four-wheel layout could change. Escape Hybrid is a showstopper Ford in 2003 will launch the world's first production hybrid-electric SUV, which will be the subject of much discussion at this month's 2002 SAE International Truck & Bus Meeting & Exhibition.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-11-01

2009-11-01
Software shifts into automatic mode Automatic code generation is speeding up development and helping to improve automotive system reliability. Coming out party Plastics abound inside vehicles, but they are increasingly finding new applications outside the cockpit thanks to a heavy push for lightweight solutions. Cutting emissions down to size While the long-term future may deliver an efficient alternative to the internal-combustion engine, a few UK-led projects are tackling short-to medium-term solutions for improving engine-out emissions and efficiency of gasoline and diesel engines.
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