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Automotive Engineering: June 2018

2018-06-01
Underway on nuclear power Ford Motor Co. CTO Dr. Ken Washington is driving new approaches to technology innovation—from inside and outside the enterprise. Silicon drives autonomy movement Renesas’ Amrit Vivekanand explains how the software and semiconductors that underlie the industry’s rapid transition are rapidly evolving. Automotive propulsion ‘On a journey’ CTO Jeff Hemphill explains how Schaeffler Group is blending its longstanding mechanical-systems expertise with critical investment in electrification and autonomy. Steeling for reduced mass and higher strength New 3rd-generation AHSS and steel-polymer hybrid tech aim to cut mass by up to 30%—and take a bite out of aluminum’s business. Balancing the rumble and roar Multiphysics simulation is part of the development toolset at Mahindra Two Wheelers, as the Indian motorcycle and scooter maker expands into global markets with larger bikes. Le Mans 2018: can anyone beat Toyota’s hybrids?
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-10-01

2001-10-01
Semiconductors flex their muscles Makers of semiconductors see the automotive market as a prime opportunity for growth. The first part of this article looks at this growth from the perspective of semiconductor industry leader Motorola. The second part highlights some recent semiconductor product introductions. 2002 supplier technology As automakers increase outsourcing, suppliers are taking on more responsibility for developing increasingly complex systems and components. This special edition of Tech Briefs highlights some of the many supplier contributions to 2002 passenger cars. Vision sensors and the intelligent vehicle Advancements in CMOS imaging sensors have enabled Delphi engineers to adapt low-cost, high-quality cameras for a variety of applications in integrated safety systems. The reborn Thunderbird Taking cues from the 1955 model, the 2002 car benefited from Ford's modern platform and systems engineering as well as C3P computer modeling techniques.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2000-10-01

2000-10-01
Speed is king Motorsports offers automakers a fast way to develop new technologies and quick-thinking engineers. This article explores how DaimlerChrysler, Ford, and General Motors approach motorsports as an engineering tool. Electronics: changing the shape of the automobile The decisions made by the automotive industry the next few years will forever change the shape of the automobile. The electronic technologies to improve fuel economy, increase passenger safety, lower emissions, and improve reliability are evolving quickly, but because of their cost the exact timeframe for their implementation is undecided. Chevrolet Corvette The Z06 is the big news for 2001, the new model having a high-output 5.7-L LS6 V8 developed by GM Powertrain. Innovation meets the mid-size segment The 2001 Chrysler Sebring and Dodge Stratus offer more power, enhanced NVH characteristics, and improved safety. Third-generation M3 The all-new high-performance M3 coupe debuts in North America.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2007-10-01

2007-10-01
After CD, what's next? Storing music in cars remains fraught with many engineering considerations as infotainment systems move into the next generation. Chevrolet Malibu General Motors has enhanced its midsize architecture for a more refined and luxurious ownership experience. Chrysler minivans Chrysler's family haulers feature a new look and more interior flexibility to go with a host of technology upgrades. Jaguar XF The company's middle sedan is updated with a 21st century interpretation of traditional standards. BMW M3 The high-performance version of the 3 Series coupe gets V8 power, other significant upgrades. Honda Accord The eighth generation of Honda's popular sedan offers more space, power, and safety. Fiat 500 The new car's styling harks back to the original of over 70 years ago, but it employs modern technology and shares a platform with the forthcoming Ford Ka replacement.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-09-01

2001-09-01
Trends in advanced chassis control Motorola vehicle system developers examine the state-of-the-art microprocessor and other electronic technologies driving the development of advanced braking, steering, suspension control, and collision warning/avoidance systems. Wheel design and engineering Consumer demand is driving the automakers' move to large-diameter, shiny, alloy wheels. Telematics and the digital car As development of new telematics products and services gain speed, OEMS, suppliers, and other players in the automotive industry are using simulators as a tool to gain greater understanding of driver distraction. NisSun Rising Nissan is back, according to President and COO Carlo Hosn, thanks to a revised product development structure that makes better use of employees and technology. Back to the future for Ford manufacturing The Vice President of Vehicle Operations said the company's goal is raw materials to finished goods in one day.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2002-09-01

2002-09-01
Fuel-cell commercialization The technology race is on to market the next revolution in automotive propulsion, with the first vehicles in limited quantities coming from Toyota and Honda by the end of the year. Telematics technology trends Analysts at the Telematics Research Group explain the computer, communications, and automotive electronic component advancements that will influence systems development. No end in sight to electronics' growth The biennial Convergence conference on transportation electronics, hosted by DaimlerChrysler, will explore the interplay of electronics with mechanical and other systems to improve vehicle safety, performance, and convenience. Making contacts Engineers at AMI DODUCO reveal their latest research and developments on critical automotive electrical contact reliability.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2008-09-01

2008-09-01
Looking forward to safer highways New camera technologies, along with better algorithms and software, are enabling the move to active-safety systems that warn and then take control of vehicles in dangerous situations. Fuel-cell futures Eager to find alternative-propulsion solutions, automakers are betting that renewed emphasis on fuel-cell vehicles will pay off in the long run, with the latest examples aiming to prove higher-volume production feasibility. Consensus building ojn refrigerant type The hydrofluoro-olefin refrigerant HFO-1234yf has emerged as Europe's favored R-134a replacement, but some prefer R-744. Strengthening the link through software The next generation of simulation tools could help better synchronize manufacturing engineering and product design.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-09-01

2009-09-01
A sense of safety Engineers are looking to combine radars of different ranges, cameras, and sophisticated controls to prevent collisions. Priming the green-car pump In a "perfect storm of opportunity," billions of dollars in federal funding are flowing toward next-generation, made-in-the-U.S. hybrid and electric-vehicle technology. Re-engineering the auto engineer The electrification of the vehicle is boosting demand for engineers with new competencies and skill sets. In Part 1 of this special two-part feature series, AEI examines why the industry needs to encourage and develop its most critical resource-people. Aerodynamics soar Automakers toil to minimize drag and maximize fuel economy.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2004-09-01

2004-09-01
Ultracapacitors charge ahead The limitations of current energy-storage solutions could encourage consideration of these alternative solutions, but more engineering work needs to be done to reduce costs. Technology for all Automotive industry executives expect high-end technologies, once considered only for inclusion in luxury cars, to increasingly make their way into entry- and mid-level vehicles in the very near future. Convergence continues A lot of automotive electronics ground has been covered at the Convergence conferences past, and there's more to come at this year's show in October. Fueling the next generation As hydrogen joins the battle for automotive power with gasoline and diesel, the future could be more choices rather than one winner.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-09-01

2006-09-01
Systems drive safety Engineers are using a holistic approach to design safer vehicles by adding function and integrating multiple subsystems. The gas in greener Biodiesels promise to help reduce petroleum consumption and CO2 emissions, but much of the potential depends on production and infrastructure investment. Good vibrations Instead of excising all noise, vibration, and harshness, engineers are focusing more on making specific sounds and feedback "fit" a vehicle. SAE Commercial Vehicle Congress Preview International Truck and Engine executives head the charge for "positive industry change" at SAE's third Congress for the on- and off-highway communities.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-04-01

2009-04-01
A winning iQ SAE members voted Toyota's new microcar the Best Engineering Vehicle for 2009. The iQ shows its smarts with brilliant packaging, city-friendly efficiency, and superb overall execution. Diesel or gasoline hybrids? As the global financial crisis deepens, companies must hone their R&D programs and attempt to choose winning technologies with the European OEMs, in particular, debating their hybrid strategies. Engine upgrade With displacements headed downward but output expectations undiminished, evolving sensor technologies and strategies are helping to give a boost to engine performance, efficiency, and emissions. Smooth riding ahead Integration and continuous development are the key words as chassis dynamics head into this century's second decade. Building in smarter materials Technologies that can automatically respond to changing conditions are expected to show up increasingly in future automobiles.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2007-04-01

2007-04-01
Spec Formula One The series is moving forward with new rules to reduce cost and make racing more directly relevant to road-car development. Adding foresight Radar and cameras will work together to help drivers avoid accidents. Lexus LS 460:AEI's Best Engineered Vehicle for 2007 The fourth generation of Lexus' global flagship sets new standards in engineering, technical innovation, refinement, and workmanship. Hot off the grid New interest in plug-in hybrids has sparked intense R&D in battery chemistries and systems integration. Digital developments Ever-improving computer-based tools are helping engineers complete more complex designs in shorter time frames with downsized staffs. Illuminating technology Sensor-linked lighting systems, automatic high-beam control, LED headlights, and brand-identifying cabin lighting are enhancing safety, convenience, and the feel-good factor.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-04-01

2005-04-01
Throwing their weight around Vehicle mass took a back seat to aesthetics, functionality, and performance when automaker executives discussed the merits of their new products at the North American International Auto Show. Safety drives sensor growth New semiconductor technologies provide more data in a wide range of systems. Wireless gains support Wi-Fi is seen as the link between consumer electronics and cars. Supply chain migration As automakers ramp up operations in China, suppliers must consider the challenges as well as the opportunities of supporting them there. Automakers focus on soft money The huge surge in software makes it a focus for cost cutting. Chevrolet Corvette: AEI's Best Engineered Vehicle for 2005. The sixth-generation car delivers even more performance value than its predecessor, and adds greater comfort and convenience into the mix.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2008-08-01

2008-08-01
Back to the high-power future Executive Vice President Masatami Takimoto and other officials are re-engineering Toyota, borrowing elements of the past to tackle 21st-century environmental changes. Racing to green mobility The President of Honda R&D, Masaaki Kato, hopes to harness the company's "racing spirit" to research and develop innovative methods to reduce the CO2 emissions of its products. Charging ahead Nissan's Senior Vice President, Minoru Shinohara, explains the battery technology that will allow feasible electric cars, while not forgetting to mention the GT-R supercar. Market Genesis Hyundai-Kia R&D Center Chief Hyun-Soon Lee has added the top market-research job at the company as it tries to quickly add more value to its products with new technologies and features. China goes shiftless Suppliers hope to capitalize on the future gold mine for automatic transmissions by working with OEMs on high-tech but low-cost solutions.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-08-01

2006-08-01
Seats of power Car users are sitting on more advanced features than ever before, but increasing demands for "comfort" and other considerations have focused industry brainpower on slimmer seat designs, new trim materials, and innovative technology solutions. Big changes for powertrain control Electronics innovations are behind many of the advances in hybrid, diesel, and conventional gasoline engines. Plastic on the outside For many new vehicles, light weight is paramount, and so too is eye-catching design. That's why plastic body panels will become more prevalent. Toyota powers ahead The company's powertrain strategy follows Toyota President Watanabe's dream that a Toyota car be able to cross the American continent with no refueling while cleansing the atmosphere as it travels. The Honda way In the pipeline are a "dedicated hybrid car for family use," a super-clean diesel that meets U.S.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2004-08-01

2004-08-01
Success by design Toyota is working to differentiate itself from the competition by continually evolving its unique design philosophy. China overcapacity overstated? Automakers and suppliers are taking a "build it and they will come" approach to capacity in China. Challenges aplenty in China From an underdeveloped infrastructure to insufficient policing of intellectual property rights, government and industry leaders in China are dealing with a multitude of challenges--and opportunities--as vehicle sales soar. Testing adapts Growing vehicle complexity, globalization, and other industry trends are prompting companies to focus more on automation and standardization in their test programs. Lightweight vehicle engineering Demand for performance and fuel economy make materials once considered too expensive increasingly attractive.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-08-01

2005-08-01
Broadening horizons Japanese manufacturing continue to diversify, investing in the launch of a domestic premium brand, updating an iconic sports car, and developing a variety of safer micro cars that are gaining popularity all over the world. Today for tomorrow Japanese automotive manufacturers are researching new engine technologies to improve power, efficiency, and emissions. Continental Flying Spur Bentley engineers sought "no compromises" in creating their new GT-based 312-km/h (194-mph) sedan. Material issue Automakers apply advanced materials to stem the rising tide of weight from increasing safety and convenience features. Testing trends This special edition of Testing & Simulation focuses on some of the more innovative technologies designed to satisfy the industry's demanding testing needs. Trading in a socket wrench for a software patch The good old days of taking your car to the repair shop down the street and hoping for the best as Mr.
Magazine

MARCH 2010 AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN

2010-03-01
Jaguar's green technology Jaguar is synonymous with sporting elegance and refinement-and now also high tech materials and green endeavour. Ian Adcock gets the inside story from the all new XJ's engineering design team Spotlight on Phil Hodgkinson Phil Hodgkinson talks with Ian Adcock about Jaguar Land Rover's future engineering strategy EcoBoost set to cut fuel consumption by 20% Ford's EcoBoost is about more than cutting engine capacity and adding direct injection, turbocharging and twin variable camshafts. Automotive Design reveals the technology behind the headlines
Magazine

MAY 2010 AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN

2010-05-01
Spotlight on Ulrik Grape Ulrik Grape, president Ener1 Europe, gives Ian Adcock an insight into the future of EVs Technological Tour De Force This year's SAE World Congress was a showcase for advanced technologies. We highlight those that impressed most Wankel's new lease of life Once dismissed for its oil consumption and high wear rates, Wankel rotary engines could be reborn in a range extender, as Ian Adcock discovers
Magazine

MAR/APR 2012 AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN

2012-04-25
Winning the power struggle Ian Adcock finds out more from Dr Robert Brand of Vacuumschmelze and drivetek's Drs Andrea Vezzini and Ludvica Baselgia Ethernet finds its place in automotive Mark Fletcher reports on why it has taken Ethernet so long to become an accepted automotive standard Smoothing the way to greater efficiency A common concern that unites the automobile industry is the quest to improve fuel efficiency and thus reduce CO₂ emissions, says Tony Lewin
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