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Automotive Engineering International 2001-10-01

2001-10-01
Semiconductors flex their muscles Makers of semiconductors see the automotive market as a prime opportunity for growth. The first part of this article looks at this growth from the perspective of semiconductor industry leader Motorola. The second part highlights some recent semiconductor product introductions. 2002 supplier technology As automakers increase outsourcing, suppliers are taking on more responsibility for developing increasingly complex systems and components. This special edition of Tech Briefs highlights some of the many supplier contributions to 2002 passenger cars. Vision sensors and the intelligent vehicle Advancements in CMOS imaging sensors have enabled Delphi engineers to adapt low-cost, high-quality cameras for a variety of applications in integrated safety systems. The reborn Thunderbird Taking cues from the 1955 model, the 2002 car benefited from Ford's modern platform and systems engineering as well as C3P computer modeling techniques.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2000-09-01

2000-09-01
Improving lightweight vehicle dynamics Bosch engineers used numerical simulation to evaluate vehicle concepts using variable semi-active components, tire specifications, and suspension spring rates. Dr. Reitzle's prescription for Jaguar His vision for the brand is to "use top-level technology and do so in a very emotional way." Dual-voltage power networks Lear Automotive EEDS has developed an innovative electrical and electronic architecture to handle future high-power requirements in vehicles. New door closure concepts Bosch and Temic engineers are developing technologies for passive entry, vehicle immobilization, and remote control. TwinCAN: one module for two nodes The ability to use one module to control two CAN nodes provides benefits including reduced hardware and software requirements, improved functionality, and lower CPU load, according to Infineon researchers.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-09-01

2005-09-01
Little parts, big challenges Connectors and chip packages must meet a broad range of requirements in automotive electronic systems. Beyond SOS The telematics business is diversifying as today's providers grow their capabilities. Fuel for thought The demand for clean, renewable energy is driving research into different sources of fuel and new, more flexible engine technologies. Network topology will be key SAE 100 Future look: From the perspective of a global supplier of automotive manufacturing technology, especially in the area of machine control, Siemens views the issue of network topology as the key driver for the future. Driving to global, speaking the same language SAE 100 Future look: Globalization is an essential strategy for success in the automotive industry. The power of turbocharging SAE 100 Future look: Today, more than 50% of all newly registered passenger cars in Europe are turbodiesels.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2008-04-01

2008-04-01
LED-ing the way Headlamps using low-power semiconductors called light-emitting diodes have moved from concept to reality with recent production firsts, but challenges remain in taking the technology mainstream. High-value hybrids The drive to reduce hybrid vehicle cost while boosting efficiency has brought new attention to stop-start and mild-hybrid systems. Sustainability on a small scale Nanotechnology is a new battleground for fighting emissions and making vehicles more environmentally friendly. Sensors inside Suppliers are helping OEMs enhance interior comfort and convenience. CO2: The next big challenge This roundup of recent engineering developments highlights that cutting emissions does not have to mean cutting the fun. Clearing the air Emissions and fuel-efficiency issues emerge collectively as the top concern among engineers attending this year's SAE World Congress.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2007-04-01

2007-04-01
Spec Formula One The series is moving forward with new rules to reduce cost and make racing more directly relevant to road-car development. Adding foresight Radar and cameras will work together to help drivers avoid accidents. Lexus LS 460:AEI's Best Engineered Vehicle for 2007 The fourth generation of Lexus' global flagship sets new standards in engineering, technical innovation, refinement, and workmanship. Hot off the grid New interest in plug-in hybrids has sparked intense R&D in battery chemistries and systems integration. Digital developments Ever-improving computer-based tools are helping engineers complete more complex designs in shorter time frames with downsized staffs. Illuminating technology Sensor-linked lighting systems, automatic high-beam control, LED headlights, and brand-identifying cabin lighting are enhancing safety, convenience, and the feel-good factor.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-08-01

2006-08-01
Seats of power Car users are sitting on more advanced features than ever before, but increasing demands for "comfort" and other considerations have focused industry brainpower on slimmer seat designs, new trim materials, and innovative technology solutions. Big changes for powertrain control Electronics innovations are behind many of the advances in hybrid, diesel, and conventional gasoline engines. Plastic on the outside For many new vehicles, light weight is paramount, and so too is eye-catching design. That's why plastic body panels will become more prevalent. Toyota powers ahead The company's powertrain strategy follows Toyota President Watanabe's dream that a Toyota car be able to cross the American continent with no refueling while cleansing the atmosphere as it travels. The Honda way In the pipeline are a "dedicated hybrid car for family use," a super-clean diesel that meets U.S.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-08-01

2005-08-01
Broadening horizons Japanese manufacturing continue to diversify, investing in the launch of a domestic premium brand, updating an iconic sports car, and developing a variety of safer micro cars that are gaining popularity all over the world. Today for tomorrow Japanese automotive manufacturers are researching new engine technologies to improve power, efficiency, and emissions. Continental Flying Spur Bentley engineers sought "no compromises" in creating their new GT-based 312-km/h (194-mph) sedan. Material issue Automakers apply advanced materials to stem the rising tide of weight from increasing safety and convenience features. Testing trends This special edition of Testing & Simulation focuses on some of the more innovative technologies designed to satisfy the industry's demanding testing needs. Trading in a socket wrench for a software patch The good old days of taking your car to the repair shop down the street and hoping for the best as Mr.
Magazine

MAY/JUN 2013 AUTO DESIGN

2013-06-01
Valve controls Imagine a valve control system that is infinitely variable irrespective of engine speed and load. Impossible? Not according to Camcon Automotive's technical director Roger Stone, as Ian Adcock discovers Mother Nature knows best What can the automotive industry learn from nature when it comes to weight saving? Ryan Borroff has been finding out Building up the pressure Tony Lewis reports on the growing trend towards even higher line pressures in injection systems.
Magazine

JUL/AUG 2012 AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN

2012-07-25
An eye on the road ahead Professor Alan Baddeley tells Ian Adcock how driving can be made easier and safer Bearing gifts Ian Adcock discovers from Federal Mogul how bearings will improve engine efficiency Raising the roof Tony Lewin reports on a new breed of open tops and convertibles
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2004-12-01

2004-12-01
Lighting goes digital Headlights move towards full integration with sensors, adjusting to turns and other driving conditions, while high-intensity discharge and light-emitting-diode technologies see continued growth. 2004 technology in review AEI editors look back at some of the most significant engineering and innovation stories of the past year. The age of digital experience SAE 100 Future look: Automotive historians will remember the beginning of the 21st century as a defining moment in the history of an industry. Simplifying advanced computing SAE 100 Future look: There is no doubt the world is changing. Global competition and sourcing, cost pressures, safety, and environmental concerns are just a few evolving realities facing the automotive industry today.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-11-01

2005-11-01
Frankfurt (Hybrid) Motor Show Dual-power technology was driven through the doors of the huge German complex in a way that has never been seen before. Bringing good things to light Emerging lighting technologies deliver more design flexibility as they get brighter, smarter, and smaller. Tightening supply chain links Improved electronic tools and more outsourcing fuel increased collaboration. Extreme two-wheeler engineering American Motorcyclist Association Superbike racing spurs development of truly super street bikes. Engineering for the aftermarket Suppliers that serve the OE market are setting their sights on the growing market for customization.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-11-01

2003-11-01
Frankfurt Motor Show concepts Visitors to the 60th IAA held in September were greeted with 125 world premieres, 60 of which were new vehicles by the world's automotive manufacturers. Prior to the public event, AEI editors scoured the show to put together this special section of Global Vehicles highlighting the best-in-show concept cars. Dynamic rollover testing on the way NHTSA announces that the 'fishhook' manuever, along with the static stability factor, will be used to rate vehicles for rollover propensity beginning with the 2004 model year. Shortening the chain Despite the trend toward increased outsourcing, the integration of compounding and molding operations at molded composite parts maker Composite Products resulted in a leaner and more economical supply chain. NASCAR research and development With the help of a new managing director and R&D center, the popular racing series is pursuing technology to improve safety and level competition.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2004-11-01

2004-11-01
2004 Paris Motor Show Highlights Though themes were distinctly elusive, there was a broad spectrum of technology, design, and styling on display from Europe-based manufacturers. Production-based cars race ahead The SCCA's Speed World Challenge has delivered automakers a U.S. platform for racecars that are closely related to the vehicles they sell. Let's come together Supplier parks are beginning to take hold in North America as automakers and their suppliers look to improve supply-chain efficiency and reduce costs. Grand ride for Grand Cherokee Jeep engineers give the 2005 model more on-road comfort, with all the off-road capability. Land Rovers makes a Discovery The new SUV, to be called LR3 in the United States, is the first all-new vehicle developed under Ford's leadership and is described as the most technologically advanced Land Rover so far.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2004-10-01

2004-10-01
Safe and sensitive Sensor fusion is the latest data sharing scheme for improving the performance of safety systems. BMW counts down to 1 Series The company's latest entry in the premium compact segment comes to market with rear-wheel drive, 50:50 weight distribution, and longitudinally mounted engines headlined by a powerful turbodiesel. Chevrolet re-engineers Corvette Although the new C6 is shorter and narrower than its predecessor, engineers wanted "more power, more passion, more precision" for the two-seat sportscar. 2005 Honda Odyssey The completely re-engineered model features new technologies from the inside out related to safety, performance, and entertainment. Chrsyler 300 / Dodge Magnum The "it" vehicles for the 2005 model year feature advanced technologies such as cylinder deactivation to go along with Hemi power and distinctive styling. Ford makes space for family vehicles Volvo donates its P2 platform for the new Ford Five Hundred, Freestyle, and Mercury Montego.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2000-08-01

2000-08-01
The battle of the metals Engineers continue to improve the properties of metal and evolve manufacturing technologies to enable metals to maintain, or achieve more of, a competitive presence in vehicles. Global Concepts This second of two parts reviews some of the more significant vehicles from past year's motor shows and showcases trends in design and technology from the world's auotmakers. Good Vibrations AEI takes a look at what some companies are doing to improve vehicle NVH. Asia after the storm This final segment of AEI's three-part look at doing business in the digital age focuses on suppliers and OEMs in Asia. Producing fully dense PM parts A new process from PM Krupp Technologies Inc., F2, is suitable for producing fully dense parts that are too expensive to machine or cast, or that require the high strength, hardness, and durablity that conventional (low-density) powder metal cannot provide.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2002-08-01

2002-08-01
Then there were two Prevailing sentiment in the Japanese media, and to some extent among the public, is that there are two truly indigenous automobile manufacturers in Japan: the Toyota group of companies and Honda. Others have entrenched themselves in global alliances for much-needed infusions of foreign capital. Cars and light trucks merge As light-vehicle segments blur in function and utlility, Japanese manufacturers are placing body design emphasis on optimum space utilization and crash safety. Chassis trends Technologies in development by Japanese companies include lane keeping, steer by wire, and dynamic stability via hybrid-electric drive. Engines and electric motors The Japanese industry is pursuing a high-tech mix of internal combustion engines, hybrid IC/electric powertrains, and fuel cells.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-04-01

2003-04-01
Phantom materializes BMW's Rolls-Royce Motor Cars unveils its first model, an aluminum-bodied sedan with rear-hinged rear doors and a new V12. Protecting the cabin from powertrain NVH OEMs are getting help from suppliers such as Collins & Aikman and Bayer in damping NVH, thanks to innovation in plastics. Forced induction Environmental pressures prompt renewed interest in turbochargers and superchargers. Collaboration software emerges Interactive product development tools that can decrease design time and cost, enhance quality, and improve engineering processes are now widely available. Validated virtual testing DaimlerChrysler and MTS Systems have verified that component load histories can be predicted before prototypes are built. Automation: a tool, not an end Toyota and its suppliers try to strike a balance between automation and manual labor at their U.S. plants.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2000-02-01

2000-02-01
Increasing the hydroforming knowledge base Tube hydroforming has become a viable economic alternative to various stamping and welding processes in automotive applications. Controlling two-stroke engine emissions With the constant rich operation of two-stroke engines, common design criteria for three-way catalysts fail. DaimlerChrysler technical symposium A year after the merger that created the new corporation, engineers from both groups came together to present a unified technical symposium to review the future direction of the new organization. Here are some highlights of the more significant technical developments. Vertical complex-shape headlamp reflectors Another improvement in lighting technology gives designers increased flexibility in vehicle appearance with no loss in lighting performance. Advances in static and dynamic exhaust system seating Major redesign, combined with minor improvements in simple details, returns significant benefits in sealing.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-02-01

2001-02-01
Solving the driver distraction problem Is voice-recognition technology the silver bullet? No, engineers agree, but it has its place. Succeeding in the alliance game It was General Motors' Arvin F. Mueller, Chairperson of the SAE 2001 World Congress, who came up with "Succeeding in the Alliance Game" as the theme for the March 5-8 automotive engineering event in Detroit. Ferrari 360 aerodynamic development The search for downforce without aerodyamic devices, such as wings or spoilers, led to novel solutions for the car's suspension. Renault's Euro 3 engine Flexible injection systems allowed Renault VI engineers to balance many conflicting priorities in developing Europe's first heavy-duty diesel engine with a fully electronic high-injection-pressure common-rail injection system. Meeting future emissions standards with diesel SUVs AVL List believes that diesel engines could be one way to improve the environmental acceptance of sport utility vehicles.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-03-01

2001-03-01
Toyota Prius: Best-Engineered Car of 2001 Following the Japanese introduction of the first-generation Pruis in 1997, the significantly re-engineered second-generation model features new technology to meet the demands of the Western market, including improved driving performance, lower emissions, and reduced costs. Introducing Niel Schilke, SAE President for 2001 General Motors' former top engineer in Canada brings a systems engineering mentality, along with high expectations, to the SAE presidency. Fuel cells start to look real It is looking more and more as if the fuel-cell-powered car--the long-awaited "clean personal transportation of the future"--is moving from laboratory vision to technical reality, if not yet market actuality. Fuel-cell testing Capabilities that deliver reliable monitoring and control, as well as offer the benefit of a flexible configuration, are critical to keep pace with evolving fuel-cell technology, according to National Instruments.
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