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Automotive Engineering International 2001-10-01

2001-10-01
Semiconductors flex their muscles Makers of semiconductors see the automotive market as a prime opportunity for growth. The first part of this article looks at this growth from the perspective of semiconductor industry leader Motorola. The second part highlights some recent semiconductor product introductions. 2002 supplier technology As automakers increase outsourcing, suppliers are taking on more responsibility for developing increasingly complex systems and components. This special edition of Tech Briefs highlights some of the many supplier contributions to 2002 passenger cars. Vision sensors and the intelligent vehicle Advancements in CMOS imaging sensors have enabled Delphi engineers to adapt low-cost, high-quality cameras for a variety of applications in integrated safety systems. The reborn Thunderbird Taking cues from the 1955 model, the 2002 car benefited from Ford's modern platform and systems engineering as well as C3P computer modeling techniques.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-09-01

2005-09-01
Little parts, big challenges Connectors and chip packages must meet a broad range of requirements in automotive electronic systems. Beyond SOS The telematics business is diversifying as today's providers grow their capabilities. Fuel for thought The demand for clean, renewable energy is driving research into different sources of fuel and new, more flexible engine technologies. Network topology will be key SAE 100 Future look: From the perspective of a global supplier of automotive manufacturing technology, especially in the area of machine control, Siemens views the issue of network topology as the key driver for the future. Driving to global, speaking the same language SAE 100 Future look: Globalization is an essential strategy for success in the automotive industry. The power of turbocharging SAE 100 Future look: Today, more than 50% of all newly registered passenger cars in Europe are turbodiesels.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2005-04-01

2005-04-01
Throwing their weight around Vehicle mass took a back seat to aesthetics, functionality, and performance when automaker executives discussed the merits of their new products at the North American International Auto Show. Safety drives sensor growth New semiconductor technologies provide more data in a wide range of systems. Wireless gains support Wi-Fi is seen as the link between consumer electronics and cars. Supply chain migration As automakers ramp up operations in China, suppliers must consider the challenges as well as the opportunities of supporting them there. Automakers focus on soft money The huge surge in software makes it a focus for cost cutting. Chevrolet Corvette: AEI's Best Engineered Vehicle for 2005. The sixth-generation car delivers even more performance value than its predecessor, and adds greater comfort and convenience into the mix.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2006-08-01

2006-08-01
Seats of power Car users are sitting on more advanced features than ever before, but increasing demands for "comfort" and other considerations have focused industry brainpower on slimmer seat designs, new trim materials, and innovative technology solutions. Big changes for powertrain control Electronics innovations are behind many of the advances in hybrid, diesel, and conventional gasoline engines. Plastic on the outside For many new vehicles, light weight is paramount, and so too is eye-catching design. That's why plastic body panels will become more prevalent. Toyota powers ahead The company's powertrain strategy follows Toyota President Watanabe's dream that a Toyota car be able to cross the American continent with no refueling while cleansing the atmosphere as it travels. The Honda way In the pipeline are a "dedicated hybrid car for family use," a super-clean diesel that meets U.S.
Magazine

MAY/JUN 2013 AUTO DESIGN

2013-06-01
Valve controls Imagine a valve control system that is infinitely variable irrespective of engine speed and load. Impossible? Not according to Camcon Automotive's technical director Roger Stone, as Ian Adcock discovers Mother Nature knows best What can the automotive industry learn from nature when it comes to weight saving? Ryan Borroff has been finding out Building up the pressure Tony Lewis reports on the growing trend towards even higher line pressures in injection systems.
Magazine

JUL/AUG 2012 AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN

2012-07-25
An eye on the road ahead Professor Alan Baddeley tells Ian Adcock how driving can be made easier and safer Bearing gifts Ian Adcock discovers from Federal Mogul how bearings will improve engine efficiency Raising the roof Tony Lewin reports on a new breed of open tops and convertibles
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-11-01

2009-11-01
Software shifts into automatic mode Automatic code generation is speeding up development and helping to improve automotive system reliability. Coming out party Plastics abound inside vehicles, but they are increasingly finding new applications outside the cockpit thanks to a heavy push for lightweight solutions. Cutting emissions down to size While the long-term future may deliver an efficient alternative to the internal-combustion engine, a few UK-led projects are tackling short-to medium-term solutions for improving engine-out emissions and efficiency of gasoline and diesel engines.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2004-10-01

2004-10-01
Safe and sensitive Sensor fusion is the latest data sharing scheme for improving the performance of safety systems. BMW counts down to 1 Series The company's latest entry in the premium compact segment comes to market with rear-wheel drive, 50:50 weight distribution, and longitudinally mounted engines headlined by a powerful turbodiesel. Chevrolet re-engineers Corvette Although the new C6 is shorter and narrower than its predecessor, engineers wanted "more power, more passion, more precision" for the two-seat sportscar. 2005 Honda Odyssey The completely re-engineered model features new technologies from the inside out related to safety, performance, and entertainment. Chrsyler 300 / Dodge Magnum The "it" vehicles for the 2005 model year feature advanced technologies such as cylinder deactivation to go along with Hemi power and distinctive styling. Ford makes space for family vehicles Volvo donates its P2 platform for the new Ford Five Hundred, Freestyle, and Mercury Montego.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-08-01

2009-08-01
Toyota punches innovations pedal From hybrids to robots, Toyota promises new ways of thinking to produce new and better products. Hyundai dreams As part of an internal competition, Hyundai designers let their minds wander through time, space, and perhaps some new dimension to conjure concepts that seem outlandish today. Maza fired up about internal combustion There is room in the market for hybrids and all-electric vehicles, but Mazda believes that internal-combustion engine offers the biggest bang for the buck. Helping hands Engineering consulting service providers expect to help OEMs meet greater fuel efficiency and tighter emissions standards. The upside ofdownsizing Hybrid powertrains are undergoing huge changes as successive generations emerge, increasing efficiency and offering better performance, with component sizes shrinking as engineers make changes that address cost.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2002-12-01

2002-12-01
Bending light Lighting technology is becoming more intelligent and adaptive as OEMs and suppliers develop systems that are more integrated into vehicle electronics systems for greater performance and safety. Top technologies of the year The world's automakers and suppliers were busy in 2002 equipping production vehicles with significant new technology. The editors review some of those significant "game changing" innovations for the past model year. Testing on the move Advances in mobile data acquisition, such as those from HBM, have helped engineers move the testing of vehicles from the laboratory to the road. Producing an all-new powertrain Ford and International each revamped a plant to build a new powertrain for Ford's super-duty trucks and Excursion sport utility vehicle. Making plastic parts New ways of forming plastics for automotive components were revealed at an annual contest sponsored by the Society of Plastics Engineers.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-12-01

2003-12-01
Concepts from 2003 Tokyo Motor Show Environmental, safety, and information technology were strongly emphasized in an impressive array of fuel-cell, hybrid, and pure electric concept cars. LEDs shine on The lighting technology's compact size, power, and durability excite designers who still long for flexibility in interior and exterior styling. GM, software, and electronics At its annual media preview of new models, the company demonstrated how its technology investments will pay off in more features, for more people, in more market segments. Plastics roll into new territory From structural members to Class A surfaces, plastics continue to find increasingly broad application in the automotive industry. 2003 technology in review AEI editors look back at some of the most significant production-intent innovations introduced over the past year. Forging ahead in metal forming Crude though the means may have been, humans began making and shaping metal several millenia ago.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2000-08-01

2000-08-01
The battle of the metals Engineers continue to improve the properties of metal and evolve manufacturing technologies to enable metals to maintain, or achieve more of, a competitive presence in vehicles. Global Concepts This second of two parts reviews some of the more significant vehicles from past year's motor shows and showcases trends in design and technology from the world's auotmakers. Good Vibrations AEI takes a look at what some companies are doing to improve vehicle NVH. Asia after the storm This final segment of AEI's three-part look at doing business in the digital age focuses on suppliers and OEMs in Asia. Producing fully dense PM parts A new process from PM Krupp Technologies Inc., F2, is suitable for producing fully dense parts that are too expensive to machine or cast, or that require the high strength, hardness, and durablity that conventional (low-density) powder metal cannot provide.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2004-05-01

2004-05-01
Technical highlights from Geneva The high-profile event combined new technology, fresh design, debuts of major production models, and styling concepts in a compact venue. North American technology trends Every year in the May issue, Automotive Engineering International explores the major technology trends defining the auotmotive industry in North America. In June, it will do the same Europe, and in August Asia. Internal-combustion engineering Despite a century of refinement, the gasoline engine still has untapped potential, say industry executives. Body building The quest for light, quieter, and safer cars and light trucks influences the design and engineering of most vehicle areas--body not excluded. Chassis integration keeps the rubber on the road U.S. OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers are collaborating to deliver the latest technology for performance and safety, but integration stays in-house.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2002-05-01

2002-05-01
Bouncing back The economic slowdown of the past year or so tooks its toll on the U.S. automotive industry, with U.S. OEMs suffering the brunt of lost sales. This four-section article explores some of the issues shaping the U.S. auto industry and some of the technologies U.S. OEMs and suppliers are using to combat their emboldened overseas competitors. Powering the future It's anyone's guess as to what type of power source will ultimately drive the majority of future vehicles in North America, but one thing is certain: advancements in various powertrain technologies from industry players are ready to make today's and tomorrow's cars more environmentally--and customer--friendly. Inside North American vehicles Vehicle interiors are incorporating more and more electronics, telematics, and other advanced technologies, challenging engineers and desginers to make them simple, safe, comfortable, and appealing.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2009-06-01

2009-06-01
CO2 changing focus The global economic crisis could trigger novel engineering solutions and the need for comprehensive testing. ZEVs, fuel cells, and high-tech engines Only 10% of cars on Europe's roads by 2020 may be zero-emissions vehicles, but Mercedes-Benz is supporting future ZEV and other advanced technologies with an undiminished R&D budget. Warning signs Design and engineering lead-time tightening may be strangling innovative thinking, says Royal College of Art's Harrow. The decade ahead Renault anticipates that a majority of its powertrains will be downsized to the 0.9- to 1.2-L range and that electric cars will appeal to 30% of the buying public. Automatic for the people Automatic-shifting dual-clutch transmissions are poised to grab share from traditional transmissions thanks to their combination of efficiency and convenience.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2003-07-01

2003-07-01
A different automatic Developed in conjunction with BorgWarner, Volkswagen's DSG automatic six-speed gearbox is aimed at enthusiasts and has fuel consumption superior to a manual gearbox. Accident avoidance GM and Delphi are testing adaptive cruise control and collision-warning technologies in the hope of ultimately increasing driver awareness and reducing driving behaviors that can lead to accidents. Branding vehicle dynamics The use of active systems and common hardware across several vehicle platforms, with different calibrations and control algorithms, can offer variations in character and brand, according to Prodrive Automotive technology. The drive for improved dynamics For the new XJ, Mike Cross, Jaguar's Chief Engineer for Vehicle Integrity, and his team aimed to preserve the isolation and feel of the previous car, but instill the handling precision and steering accuracy of the S-Type.
Magazine

Automotive Engineering International 2001-07-01

2001-07-01
Driven to test As automotive manufacturers and suppliers continually attempt to cut costs and reduce development cycle times, outsourcing of testing is becoming more prevalent in the industry. Testing resources This section highlights some of the latest testing products, equipment, and technologies used in sundry automotive applications from the industry's suppliers. Transmission options In this comprehensive review of technology, ZF's Group Vice President for Product Development concludes that the future belongs to automated manual, continously variable, and six-speed automatic and manual transmissions with increased capacities. Automotive moodular developments Engineers from Plastic Omnium Auto Exterieur and Inoplastic Omnium discuss design considerations for front-end module and plastic tailgate concepts. Flexible controls architecture for hybrid-electric vehicles General Motors and Motorola collaborate on a prototype vehicle for PNGV.
Magazine

SAE Off-Highway Engineering 2006-10-01

2006-10-01
Making sense of engines Heavy-duty equipment is known for its ruggedness in harsh environments, but vehicles are not neglecting their sensitive side. The world's fastest digger gets closer JCB's Dieselmax goes 350 mph and teaches engineers much about engine capability, extreme testing, and program management. The whole system, and nothing but the system Properly implemented, an electrohydraulic system can add a great deal of automatic control, advanced performance, advanced diagnostics, and remote monitoring to a mobile application. Regenerative hydraulics The use of multiple hydraulic pumps can satisfy the needs of various circuits in off-highway equipment. The gas is greener Biofuels promise to help reduce petroleum cinsumption and CO2 emissions, but much of the potential depends on production and infrastructure investments. Material returns Effective use of materials information is important to engineers in development of parts and components.
Magazine

SAE Off-Highway Engineering 2004-10-01

2004-10-01
Beyond batteries the reinvention of a 100-year old electrical energy-storage device could transform heavy-duty hybrid drive systems. Pumping down the volume The design evolution of low-noise spur and helical gear pumps. Tackling Tier 3 Both Cummins and Caterpillar choose the in-cylinder approach to reducing emissions. The telematics fix Diagnostics may be the key to keeping telematics viable and affordable. Complete and intelligent systems SAE 100 Future look: The future of mobile hydraulics can be seen today. Modern mobile hydraulics of today and tomorrow consists of complete system solutions with integrated electronics, which make off-highway machinery more efficient and, at the same time, reduce life-cycle costs. The next step in hydraulics and electronics SAE 100 Future Look: As we celebrate 100 years of SAE's contributions to our industry, it seems very appropriate to look forward at the next few years and assess where we will be.
Magazine

SAE Off-Highway Engineering 2007-09-01

2007-09-01
Digging with precision Electronic technologies continue to transform the off-highway environment, all the way down to the components used to create electrohydraulic systems, including pumps, valves, and new additions, such as house controllers and sensors. Speeding up design Software automates more tasks, handles challenges. Together for a change On- and off-highway commercial vehicle industries converge at fourth-annual Commercial Vehicle Engineering Congress & Exhibition.
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