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Brake Dynamometer Squeal Noise Test Procedure for Regenerative Systems

2019-09-19
WIP
J3211
The SAE J3211 procedure applies to brake squeal evaluation using single-ended inertia dynamometers for friction couples used on vehicles with regenerative braking systems. This RP applies to squeal noise occurrences for on-road passenger cars and light trucks with a gross vehicle weight rating of 4536 kg or below. The procedure incorporates aspects related to (a) minimum inertia dynamometer capabilties, (b) fixture requirements and setup, and (c) test sequences with emphasis on brake temperatures, brake pressure profiles, and strategies to represent brake blending.
Magazine

Autonomous Vehicle Engineering: March 2018

2018-03-08
Editorial Autonomy's data binge is more like a 5-course meal. Big Data, Big Challenges Cloud services and multiple partnerships are issues the mobility industry grapples with as data implications expand outside the vehicle. Reinventing the Automobile's Design The convergence of electric propulsion, Level 5 autonomy, and the advent of car-free urban zones, is driving new approaches to vehicle design and engineering. When Steering Isn't Steering Anymore High-level autonomy requires new thinking for even basic vehicle controls. Steer-by-wire technology eases some of the complexities automated driving presents-and offers desirable new possibilities. Autonomy and Electrification: A Perfect Match? Combining SAE Level 4/5 functionality and EV platforms brings chal-lenges-and opportunities for cost reduction and systems optimization. Who's Ahead in the Automated-Driving Race? The 2018 Navigant Research Leaderboard study brings interesting insights on the industry's progress.
Magazine

SAE Vehicle Electrification: February 11, 2014

2014-02-11
Inside the cell walls The high cost of lithium-ion batteries is a prison that has largely kept electric vehicles off the street; the keys to their release are more effective—but not more expensive—cell chemistries.
Book

The Practical Reference Guide for Corrosion of Welds - Causes and Cures

1999-01-01
Expert witness and AWS lecturer Ted V. Weber draws upon his lengthy experience as a materials troubleshooter for DuPont to present this succinct introduction to basic corrosion mechanisms. It includes pitting, intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, erosion, crevice and galvanic corrosion, and selective leaching. Full color digital photos illustrate the costly destruction caused by corrosion in welds. The author offers clear advice on how to avoid and correct corrosion, including alloying for resistance.
Book

Hydrogen, The Post-Oil Fuel?

2012-11-01
Hydrogen, energy vector for the future? Or, on the contrary, limited to its current applications in the field of chemistry and refining for decades to come, possibly even until the end of the century? There is much controversy over this issue and two sides to the argument. Advocates of the hydrogen civilization consider that, following a technological revolution hydrogen will play a universal role alongside electricity as a substitute for fossil fuels, especially (but not only) in transport, leading to radical elimination of CO2 emissions. For the skeptics, and even outspoken opponents, hydrogen will remain restricted to its current applications due to the insoluble problems inherent to its generalized use, especially in transport. This book highlights the increasing and inevitable role of "energy" hydrogen – as opposed to chemical hydrogen – in the key sectors of transport and "clean" electricity production.
Book

The People's Car

2013-04-01
At the Berlin Auto Show in 1938, Adolf Hitler presented the prototype for a small, oddly shaped, inexpensive family car that all good Aryans could enjoy. Decades later, that automobile—the Volkswagen Beetle—was one of the most beloved in the world. Bernhard Rieger examines culture and technology, politics and economics, and industrial design and advertising genius to reveal how a car commissioned by Hitler and designed by Ferdinand Porsche became an exceptional global commodity on a par with Coca-Cola. Beyond its quality and low cost, the Beetle’s success hinged on its uncanny ability to capture the imaginations of people across nations and cultures. In West Germany, it came to stand for the postwar “economic miracle” and helped propel Europe into the age of mass motorization. In the United States, it was embraced in the suburbs, and then prized by the hippie counterculture as an antidote to suburban conformity.
Book

Factory Man

2009-02-16
Factory Man is about James Harbour and the epic struggle of the U.S. auto industry to catch up to Japan in quality and productivity. Harbour is a former manufacturing executive who, partly by chance, became the first U.S. expert to study Toyota's operations in Japan. Harbour's consulting firm, Harbour & Associates has gained worldwide recognition for its annual public studies of factory productivity. The Harbour Report is the essential annual scorecard of who is winning the productivity race in the U.S. In 1981, Harbour reported that Toyota could offer a small car for sale in the U.S. at a production cost of $1,500-$1,700 less than the Detroit automakers at that time, a cost advantage of about 30 percent. The impact on Detroit was atomic, and launched the painful, historic effort by the Big Three to catch up, which continues today. James Harbour's story, blunt and accessible, includes a detailed description of how Detroit went astray, beginning right after World War II.
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