Refine Your Search

Search Results

Standard

Stoichiometric Air-Fuel Ratios of Automotive Fuels

2002-10-31
HISTORICAL
J1829_200210
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. This ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels--gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuels--that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio or same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
Standard

Stoichiometric Air-Fuel Ratios of Automotive Fuels

2015-03-17
CURRENT
J1829_201503
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. This ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels - gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuels - that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio or same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
Standard

Stoichiometric Air-Fuel Ratios of Automotive Fuels

1997-12-01
HISTORICAL
J1829_199712
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. The ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels—gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuel—-that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio of same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
Standard

Stoichiometric Air/Fuel Ratios of Automotive Fuels*hs-23/00*

1992-05-01
HISTORICAL
J1829_199205
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. The ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels--gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuels--that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio of same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This report summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
Standard

Stoichiometric Air-Fuel Ratios of Automotive Fuels

1987-06-01
HISTORICAL
J1829_198706
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. This ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels--gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuels--that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio or same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
Standard

Heating Value of Fuels

1990-05-01
HISTORICAL
J1498_199005
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines.
Standard

Heating Value of Fuels

1988-10-01
HISTORICAL
J1498_198810
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines. The changes to SAE J1498 include: SAE Publications - Added SAE Paper 2010-01-1517 Other Publications and Sections 5, 9, and 10 - Updated ASTM alphanumeric designations and titles. Section 10 - Added discussion of a method to calculate net heating value for gasoline-ethanol blends using ASTM D3338.
Standard

Heating Value of Fuels

1987-05-01
HISTORICAL
J1498_198705
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines. The changes to SAE J1498 include: SAE Publications - Added SAE Paper 2010-01-1517 Other Publications and Sections 5, 9, and 10 - Updated ASTM alphanumeric designations and titles. Section 10 - Added discussion of a method to calculate net heating value for gasoline-ethanol blends using ASTM D3338.
Standard

Heating Value of Fuels

2011-12-20
HISTORICAL
J1498_201112
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines. The changes to SAE J1498 include: SAE Publications - Added SAE Paper 2010-01-1517 Other Publications and Sections 5, 9, and 10 - Updated ASTM alphanumeric designations and titles. Section 10 - Added discussion of a method to calculate net heating value for gasoline-ethanol blends using ASTM D3338.
Standard

Heating Value of Fuels

2017-09-07
CURRENT
J1498_201709
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines. The changes to SAE J1498 include: SAE Publications - Added SAE Paper 2010-01-1517 Other Publications and Sections 5, 9, and 10 - Updated ASTM alphanumeric designations and titles. Section 10 - Added discussion of a method to calculate net heating value for gasoline-ethanol blends using ASTM D3338.
Standard

Heating Value of Fuels*HS-23/00*

1998-02-01
HISTORICAL
J1498_199802
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines.
Standard

Heating Value of Fuels

2005-12-19
HISTORICAL
J1498_200512
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines.
Standard

Automotive Gasolines

1993-01-01
HISTORICAL
J312_199301
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significant of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
Standard

Automotive Gasolines

1997-05-01
HISTORICAL
J312_199705
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
Standard

Automotive Gasolines

1987-05-01
HISTORICAL
J312_198705
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
Standard

Automotive Gasolines

1988-10-01
HISTORICAL
J312_198810
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
Standard

Automotive Gasolines

1985-06-01
HISTORICAL
J312_198506
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
Standard

Automotive Gasolines

1986-05-01
HISTORICAL
J312_198605
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
Standard

Automotive Gasolines

1980-06-01
HISTORICAL
J312_198006
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
X