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Standard

WROUGHT NICKEL AND NICKEL-RELATED ALLOYS

1976-07-01
HISTORICAL
J470_197607
This Report presents general information on over 50 alloys in which nickel either predominates or is a significant alloying element. It covers primarily wrought materials, and is not necessarily all inclusive. Values given are in most cases average or nominal, and if more precise values are required the producer(s) should be contacted. This report does not cover the so-called "superalloys," or the iron base stainless steels. Refer to SAE J467, Special Purpose Alloys, and SAE J405, Chemical Compositions of SAE Wrought Stainless Steels, respectively, for data on these alloys.
Standard

Zinc Die Casting Alloys

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J469_201712
Because of the drastic chilling involved in die casting and the fact that the solid solubilities of both aluminum and copper in zinc change with temperature, these alloys are subject to some aging changes, one of which is a dimensional change. Both of the alloys undergo a slight shrinkage after casting, which at room temperature is about two-thirds complete in five weeks. It is possible to accelerate this shrinkage by a stabilizing anneal, after which no further changes occur. The recommended stabilizing anneal is 3 to 6 h at 100 °C (212 °F), or 5 to 10 h at 85 °C (185 °F), or 10 to 20 h at 70 °C (158 °F). The time in each case is measured from the time at which the castings reach the annealing temperature. The parts may be air cooled after annealing. Such a treatment will cause a shrinkage (0.0004 in per in) of about two-thirds of the total, and the remaining shrinkage will occur at room temperature during the subsequent few weeks.
Standard

Solders

1962-06-01
HISTORICAL
J473A_196206
The choice of the type and grade of solder for any specific purpose depend on the materials to be joined and the method of applying. Those with higher amounts of tin usually wet and bond more readily and have a narrower semi-molten range than lower amounts of tin. For strictly economic reasons, it is recommended that the grade of solder metal be selected that contains least amount of tin required to give suitable flowing and adhesive qualities for application.
Standard

Wrought Nickel and Nickel-Related Alloys

1976-07-01
HISTORICAL
J470C_197607
This Report presents general information on over 50 alloys in which nickel either predominates or is a significant alloying element. It covers primarily wrought materials, and is not necessarily all inclusive. Values given are in most cases average or nominal, and if more precise values are required the producer(s) should be contacted. This report does not cover the so-called 'superalloys,' or the iron base stainless steels. Refer to SAE J467, Special Purpose Alloys, and SAE J405, Chemical Compositions of SAE Wrought Stainless Steels, respectively, for data on these alloys.
Standard

Sintered Powder Metal Parts: Ferrous

1966-06-01
HISTORICAL
J471_196606
Powder metal (P/M) parts are manufactured by pressing metal powders to the required shape in a precision die and sintering to produce metallurgical bonds between the particles, thus generating the appropriate mechanical properties. The shape and mechanical properties of the part may be subsequently modified by repressing or by conventional methods such as machining and/or heat treating. While powder metallurgy embraces a number of fields wherein metal powders may be used as raw materials, this standard is concerned primarily with information relating to mechanical components and bearings produced from iron-base materials.
Standard

SINTERED POWDER METAL PARTS: FERROUS

1973-08-01
HISTORICAL
J471_197308
Powder metal (P/M) parts are manufactured by pressing metal powders to the required shape in a precision die and sintering to produce metallurgical bonds between the particles, thus generating the appropriate mechanical properties. The shape and mechanical properties of the part may be subsequently modified by repressing or by conventional methods such. as machining and/or heat treating. While powder metallurgy embraces a number of fields wherein metal powders may be used as raw materials, this standard is concerned primarily with information relating to mechanical components and bearings produced from iron-base materials.
Standard

ELECTROPLATING AND RELATED FINISHES

1985-02-01
CURRENT
J474_198502
Electroplating is a process whereby an object is coated with one or more relatively thin, tightly adherent layers of one or more metals. It is accomplished by placing the object to be coated on a plating rack or a fixture, or in a basket or in a rotating container in such a manner that a suitable current may flow through it, and then immersing it in a series of solutions and rinses in planned sequence. The advantage to be gained by electroplating may be considerable; broadly speaking, the process is used when it is desired to endow the basis material (selected for cost, material conservation, and physical property reasons) with surface properties it does not possess. It should be noted that although electroplating is the most widely used process for applying metals to a substrate, they may also be applied by spraying, vacuum deposition, cladding, hot dipping, chemical reduction, mechanical plating, etc.
Standard

SOLDERS

1962-06-01
HISTORICAL
J473_196206
The choice of the type and grade of solder for any specific purpose will depend on the materials to be joined and the method of applying. Those with higher amounts of tin usually wet and bond more readily and have a narrower semi-molten range than lower amounts of tin. For strictly economic reasons, it is recommended that the grade of solder metal be selected that contains least amount of tin required to give suitable flowing and adhesive qualities for application. All the lead-tin solders, with or without antimony, are usually suitable for joining steel and copper base alloys. For galvanized steel or zinc, only Class A solders should be used. Class B solders, containing antimony usually as a substitute for some of the tin or to increase strength and hardness of the filler metal, form intermetallic antimony-zinc compounds, causing the joint to become embrittled. Lead-tin solders are not recommended for joining aluminum, magnesium, or stainless steel.
Standard

ABRASIVE WEAR

1966-08-01
HISTORICAL
J965_196608
An enormous economic loss, as well as a waste of natural resources, is incurred world-wide as a result of wear of components and tools. Any effort expended in an attempt to reduce this loss is indeed worthwhile. The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to present the current state of knowledge of abrasive wear. This report, therefore, covers wear, or the undesired removal of metal by mechanical action, caused by abrasive particles in contact with the surface. It does not concern metal-to-metal wear or wear in the presence of an abrasive free lubricant. Abrasive wear occurs when hard particles, such as rocks, sand, or fragments of certain hard metals, slide or roll under pressure across a surface. This action tends to cut grooves across the metal surface, much like a cutting tool. Abrasive wear is of considerable importance in any part moving in relation to an abrasive.
Standard

ALLOY AND TEMPER DESIGNATION SYSTEMS FOR ALUMINUM

1989-01-01
HISTORICAL
J993_198901
This standard provides systems for designating wrought aluminum and wrought aluminum alloys, aluminum and aluminum alloys in the form of castings and foundry ingot, and the tempers in which aluminum and aluminum alloy wrought products and aluminum alloy castings are produced.
Standard

Alloy and Temper Designation Systems for Aluminum

1973-09-01
HISTORICAL
J993B_197309
This standard provides systems for designating wrought aluminum and wrought aluminum alloys, aluminum and aluminum alloys in the form of castings and foundry ingot, and the tempers in which aluminum and aluminum alloy wrought products and aluminum alloy castings are produced.
Standard

Alloy and Temper Designation Systems for Aluminum

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J993_201801
This standard provides systems for designating wrought aluminum and wrought aluminum alloys, aluminum and aluminum alloys in the form of castings and foundry ingot, and the tempers in which aluminum and aluminum alloy wrought products and aluminum alloy castings are produced.
Standard

Selection and Heat Treatment of Tool and Die Steels

1970-04-01
HISTORICAL
J437A_197004
The information in this report covers data relating to SAE J438, Tool and Die Steels, and is intended as a guide to the selection for the steel best suited for the intended purpose and to provide recommended heat treatments and other data pertinent to their use. Specific requirements as to physical properties are not included because the majority of tool and die steels are either worked or given special heat treatments by the purchaser. The purchaser may or may not elect to use the accompanying data for specification purposes.
Standard

Selection and Heat Treatment of Tool and Die Steels

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J437_201801
The information in this report covers data relating to SAE J438, Tool and Die Steels, and is intended as a guide to the selection of the steel best suited for the intended purpose and to provide recommended heat treatments and other data pertinent to their use. Specific requirements as to physical properties are not included because the majority of tool and die steels are either worked or given special heat treatments by the purchaser. The purchaser may or may not elect to use the accompanying data for specification purposes.
Standard

SELECTION AND HEAT TREATMENT OF TOOL AND DIE STEELS

1970-04-01
HISTORICAL
J437_197004
The information in this report covers data relating to SAE J438, Tool and Die Steels, and is intended as a guide to the selection of the steel best suited for the intended purpose and to provide recommended heat treatments and other data pertinent to their use. Specific requirements as to physical properties are not included because the majority of tool and die steels are either worked or given special heat treatments by the purchaser. The purchaser may or may not elect to use the accompanying data for specification purposes.
Standard

General Data on Wrought Aluminum Alloys

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J454_201801
The SAE Standards for wrought aluminum alloys cover materials with a considerable range of properties and other characteristics, but do not include all of the commercially available materials. If none of the materials listed in Tables 1 through 7 provides the characteristics required by a particular application, users may find it helpful to consult with the suppliers of aluminum alloy products. See companion document, SAE J1434.
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