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Video

Achieving a Lightweight and Steel-Intensive Body Structure for Alternative Powertrains

2012-02-14
FutureSteelVehicle's (FSV) objective is to develop detailed design concepts for a radically different steel body structure for a compact Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV). It also will identify structure changes to accommodate larger Plug-In Hybrid (PHEV) and Fuel Cell (FCEV) vehicle variants. The presentation will demonstrate seven optimized structural sub-systems that contribute to the program's 35 percent mass reduction goals and meet its safety and life cycle emissions targets. It will explain the advanced design optimization process used and the resulting aggressive steel concepts. Presenter Jody R. Shaw, US Steel
Video

Lightweight Door Panel Made with Bio-Based Composite Material

2012-05-23
This paper presents a new concept for a 100% plastic prototype automotive door panel. This concept has the potential of providing a weight reduction of up to 40% compared to conventional steel door panels, but with equivalent performance (static strength). This innovative technology can be used for a variety of exterior automotive parts. The concept includes a composite sandwich panel combination of GFRP (glass fiber reinforced polymer), and LACTIF®, which is expanded beads foam made from PLA (polylactic acid) and developed by JSP Corporation. This GFRP+LACTIF® composite design offers the following characteristics: Excellent environmental resistance Strong adhesion Equivalent static strength (vs. conventional door panels) Design flexibility This concept also offers an alternative to conventional steel door panel systems by using unsaturated polyester material of plant origin as part of the GFRP composite.
Video

Supplier Discussions - 2012

2012-03-29
Seven different suppliers will discuss their latest technologies. Panelist Jon Bereisa, Auto Lectrification LLC John Burgers, Dana Canada Corporation Derek De Bono, Valeo Dusan Graovac, Infineon Technologies AG Ronald P. Krupitzer, American Iron and Steel Institute Timothy J. Lawler, Bosch Corp. Ian M. Sharp, Flybrid Systems LLP
Video

Monitoring the Progression of Micro-Pitting in Spur Geared Transmission Systems Using Online Health Monitoring Techniques

2012-03-16
Micro-pitting is a fatigue effect that occurs in geared transmission systems due to high contact stress, and monitoring its progression is vital to prevent the eventual failure of the tooth flank. Parameter signature analysis has been successfully used to monitor bending fatigue failure and advanced phases of gear surface fatigue failure such as macro-pitting and scuffing. However, due to modern improvements in steel production the main cause of gear contact fatigue failure can be attributed to surface micro-pitting rather than sub-surface phenomena. Responding to the consequent demand to detect and monitor the progression of micro-pitting, this study experimentally evaluated the development of micro-pitting in spur gears using vibration and oil debris analysis. The paper presents the development of an online health monitoring system for use with back-to-back gear test rigs.
Technical Paper

Resabtors - Advanced Multi-Material Muffler Designs for Clean Air Applications

2020-09-30
2020-01-1554
The development and production of resonators on the charged air side of combustion engines require profound base of knowledge in designing, simulating and the production of such parts in different materials (aluminum, copper, stainless steel and technical plastic). As combustion engines are under constant discussion, this existing knowledge base should be used for other applications within and outside the automotive industry. Very quickly it became apparent that new challenges often require completely new solutions, designs and materials to meet the requirements of flow noise reducing parts. For example, for clean air applications mufflers based on “special treated foams” and “meta-materials” can be introduced. These materials offer new potentials for tuning of the frequency range and allow improved broad banded flow noise attenuation. Such parts are named “Resabtors” in order to take respect of the different flow noise attenuation principles resonation and absorbing.
Training / Education

Metallurgy of Steel: Principles

Anytime
This online course teaches the phases and microstructures that form in steels, their effects on steel properties, the microstructure changes that occur when steel is heated and cooled, the effects of carbon content and cooling rate on the microstructures that form. Also, how to read the iron-carbon phase diagram will be discussed. All this information is applicable to understanding the effects of steel heat treating processes and heat treating process parameters on the microstructure and properties of heat treated plain carbon, low-alloy, and tools steels. The course is divided into six modules followed by a quiz.
Training / Education

Metallurgy of Steel Case Hardening

Anytime
This online course discusses common steel case hardening processes and how they are used to modify the surface layers of steels to obtain specific mechanical properties. Participants will learn about the process parameters and how they affect case composition, depth, microstructure, and properties. The course takes one hour to complete.
Training / Education

Metallurgy of Steel Through Hardening

Anytime
This online course teaches about the metallurgy of the following steel through hardening processes: quench and temper, martempering, and austempering. Participants will learn about the effects of heat treating temperature and cooling rate on steel microstructure and properties, and the effects of the interaction between heat treating process parameters and steel composition on through hardened steel microstructure and strength. This course takes one hour to complete.
Technical Paper

The Automatic Fabrication of Automobile Frames

1928-01-01
280021
NEARLY all steel used in this process of manufacturing frames comes to the plant in the form of strips, which are rolled to remove curvature and inspected automatically for dimensions. All operations and handling are automatic, except pickling, cleaning and oiling the stock and inspecting the assembled frame, until the enameled frame is ready to be shipped. Economical use of the strip steel is dependent upon an offsetting operation that makes the strip conform to the vertical curves desired in the finished frame. With the aid of illustrations, the author follows the fabricating process through the various lines and other units, until a frame is ready for shipment or storage, within less than 2 hr. after it enters the manufacturing line as strip steel.
Technical Paper

Correlating Test-Data on Heat-Treated Chromium-Vanadium Steels

1928-01-01
280023
AN outline is given of the work performed and the method of procedure followed in correlating test results on specimens of heat-treated S.A.E. chromium-vanadium steel 6130 as a basis for revision of the physical-property charts for certain automotive steels. Revision of the charts was proposed by the Iron and Steel Division of the Standards Committee of the Society, and a subcommittee, of which the author is a member, was appointed to carry on the preliminary work of revision. The paper is a report of the results of the tests made. Test specimens of S.A.E. Steel 6130, to be drawn at three different temperatures after quenching, were prepared by four steel manufacturers. These were distributed among 30 cooperating laboratories, which made a series of about 115 tests including complete chemical analysis, tensile-strength, and Brinell, scleroscope and Rockwell hardness tests on the specimens.
Technical Paper

Progress in Honing-Machines and the Honing Process

1928-01-01
280060
CYLINDER finishing by rough and finish-boring with wide tools, which was thought good enough during the first dozen years of the automobile-production period, was supplanted by reaming and grinding. Later, cast-iron and copper laps were used, but all these methods were slow and did not produce the fine finish for which a demand developed. Experiments were begun about 1920 with the process known as honing. Five years later the company with which the author is connected converted one of its drilling-machines into a single-spindle honing-machine. Other companies made similar conversions. The first honing-head was introduced in 1923. Not until three years ago, however, did honing begin to be regarded as a real production-method possibility. Since then, very rapid progress has been made and numerous improved machines, honing-heads and honing-stones have been produced.
Technical Paper

Alloy Steels and Their Application in the Automotive Industry

1928-01-01
280058
AFTER outlining the progress of research in the development of the alloy steels, the author says that alloys of steel containing nickel, chromium, and nickel and chromium, are the most important to the automotive industry, which is especially interested in alloys containing up to 5.0 per cent of nickel and up to approximately 1.5 per cent of chromium, with the carbon content ranging from 0.10 to 0.50 per cent. The additions of these amounts do not materially change the nature of the metallographic constituents, but the elements exert their influence on the physical properties largely by altering the rate of the structural changes. In straight carbon-steel, especially of large sections, it is not possible by quenching to retard the austenite transformation sufficiently to produce as good physical properties as are desired.
Technical Paper

SOME PRINCIPLES OF LOW-COST TOOLING

1933-01-01
330013
After predicting that the demand for changes in automotive products and the substitution of new devices will increase in the next few years and stating major factors with which managements are concerned at present, the author mentions that, after direct-labor costs, the next largest items of expense in a machine shop are generally depreciation and obsolescence of machines, fixtures and tools, especially when a plant is tooled for high production. He believes that the machine-tool industry might aid by reducing its prices and that this can be done, but that in such case the industry must eliminate its present cast-iron type of designing and many of its present manufacturing methods. General machine-shop practice is analyzed and the illustrations show three classes of fixtures: (a) holding, (b) self-contained tools with holding means and (c) complete mechanisms.
Technical Paper

How to Relate Body Tooling Budgets to Quantity Requirements

1933-01-01
330025
HAVING pointed out that one of the industry's most serious errors is overestimating its requirements, Mr. Manning shows how body tool budgets can be set up in relation to the quantities expected to be produced. While shunning the argument regarding relative merits from a design standpoint of the all-steel and the composition body, he does approach the question from a purely manufacturing standpoint when he says: “It will be found that certain designs lend themselves more readily to steel construction and, from a cost standpoint only, wood may be eliminated to advantage. It will become apparent, therefore, that at some point in the estimated production quantities you will find from a purely economical standpoint wood being replaced by formed steel sections in whole or in part.”
Technical Paper

Brake-Drum Metallurgy

1932-01-01
320006
EITHER steel or cast iron will provide a good braking surface provided the grain structure is laminated pearlite, according to the author. Such a structure can be secured in pressed steel by alloying or by case-hardening, in high-carbon steel rings welded to a stamped back and in centrifugally cast iron by careful control without alloying. Uniformity of analysis is important and control of the rate of cooling is still more important in castings. The graphite content of iron is not considered important as a lubricant. Methods of centrifugal casting and of testing are illustrated; also the form and microstructure of representative brake-drums. Discussers agree as to the microstructure needed and present additional views as to ways of securing that structure and the desirability of capacity for absorbing and dissipating heat. They believe grain size and strength more important than hardness.
Technical Paper

The Properties and Selection of Automotive Steels

1932-01-01
320057
METALLURGISTS must supply engineers with data on the physical properties of steels so that the skill of both can be used, particularly for machinery in which light weight is essential. The engineer who has not a metallurgical department at his command cannot be sure of duplicating results claimed by steel makers, and the physical-property data that have been given in the S.A.E. HANDBOOK are based on minimum results, for safety. More complete information as to what actually can be expected is desirable, and a subcommittee has had a large number of tests made on identical samples from several heats of two alloy steels. The results for these two steels have been coordinated in probability curves that were developed with the aid of frequency charts. Some steels are not uniform in their physical properties in large sections. The author presents suggestions for steels that are suitable for large sections, with the strengths that can be expected from them.
Technical Paper

Noise and Heat Control in the Automobile Body

1932-01-01
320050
INSULATING of automobile bodies against noise and heat has been made more complicated by the trend toward lower and more compact bodies and larger and more powerful engines, as more noise and heat are created and must be excluded from the body. Development of the all-steel body also has presented a new problem that calls for different treatment than the composite steel and wood body. Elimination of noise and heat from the body is the mutual problem of the chassis and the body engineers and must be attacked jointly, correction of the trouble being made at the most logical and practical places. Much successful work has been done in the last few years to eliminate noise and heat, but much more can be accomplished by further concentrated effort. After listing the more objectionable chassis noises which have received most attention, the author considers the remaining noise and the heat against which the body must be insulated.
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