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Advances in Catalyst Substrates, 2018

2018-04-03
Papers included in this collection cover the systems engineering experience required to achieve ultra-low emission levels on gasoline light-duty vehicles. Emission system component topics include the development of advanced three-way catalysts, the development of NOX control strategies for gasoline lean burn engines, the application of high cell density substrates to advanced emission systems, and the integration of these components into full vehicle emission systems.
Collection

Advances in NOx Reduction Technology, 2015

2015-04-14
This technical paper collection will focus on ‘Advances in NOx Reduction Technology’. The topics covered will include: new materials for lean NOx traps (LNT) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR); system integration and durability; advances in NOx catalyst substrates, novel reductants and mixing designs.
Collection

Emission Measurement and Testing, 2014

2014-04-01
This technical paper collection covers emissions measuring techniques and testing regimes including new analysis techniques and the novel application of existing techniques, the comparison of existing and proposed testing regimes with real world experience, including modeling.
Technical Paper

The Modeling of Mold Filling in Structural Reaction Injection Molding

1996-04-01
91A118
The main use of FRC in automobiles, with the exception of a few specialized low volume vehicles, has been until now in semistructural parts. One of the most promising process in development today, that may play major role in future structural composite fabrication, is based on SRIM technology. The rapid and extensive introduction of this process goes also through the development of deeper theoretical knowledge of the process and the development of computer simulation to aid mold design and choice of proper processing parameters. To contribute SRIM advancement, a preliminary model has been developed for viscosity changes, extent of the reaction and temperature rises, associated with the mold filling stage, as well as a simple software to evaluate the pressure drop through different combinations of reinforcements.
Technical Paper

U.S. and California Vehicle Emissions Control Programs Effectiveness and Application of Experience

1988-03-01
871148
Many areas of the world are in various stages of development which frequently includes a rapid increase in the motor vehicle population. As a result, some areas are beginning to show the effect of increased motor vehicle use on air pollution. The vehicle's contribution to California's air pollution has long been recognized and studied, and measures have been implemented to reduce emissions from motor vehicles. The history of light duty vehicle emission control in the South Coast Air Basin of California is reviewed. Emission reductions achieved, current levels, projected future emissions and the need for further emissions reductions from light duty vehicles are discussed. For other areas of the world where motor vehicles contribute to air pollution, suggestions are made which can improve the effectiveness of emission control efforts; which should be consistent with political and economic realities, and efforts to achieve international harmonization of standards.
Technical Paper

Contribution of Soot Contaminated Oils to Wear-Part II

1999-05-03
1999-01-1519
Diesel soot interacts with the engine oil and leads to wear of engine parts. Engine oil additives play a crucial role in preventing wear by forming the anti-wear film between the wearing surfaces. The current study was aimed at investigating the interactions between engine soot and oil properties in order to develop high performance oils for diesel engines equipped with exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR). The effect of soot contaminated oil on wear of engine components was examined using a statistically designed experiment. To quantitatively analyze and simulate the extent of wear a three-body wear machine was designed and developed. The qualitative wear analysis was performed by examining the wear scars on an AISI 52100 stainless steel ball worn in the presence of oil test samples on a ball-on-flat disc setup. The three oil properties studied were base stock, dispersant level and zinc dithiophosphate level.
Technical Paper

Effects of Load on Emissions and NOx Trap/Catalyst Efficiency for a Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engine

1999-05-03
1999-01-1528
A 1998 Toyota Corona passenger car with a direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine was tested at constant engine speed (2000 rpm) over a range of loads. Engine-out and tailpipe emissions of gas phase species were measured each second. This allowed examination of the engine-out emissions for late and early injection. Regeneration of the lean NOx trap/catalyst was also examined, as was the efficiency of NOx reduction. NOx stored in the trap/catalyst is released at the leading edge of regenerations, such that the tailpipe NOx is higher than the engine-out NOx for a brief period. The efficiency of NOx reduction was <50% for the lowest loads examined. As the load increased, the efficiency of NOx reduction decreased to near 0% due to excessive catalyst temperatures. Loads sufficiently high to require a rich mixture produce high NOx reduction efficiencies, but in this case the NOx reduction occurs via the three-way catalysts on this vehicle.
Technical Paper

Engine-Out Emissions from a Direct-Injection Spark-Ignition (DISI) Engine

1999-05-03
1999-01-1529
The effects of operating parameters (speed, load, spark-timing, EGR, and end of fuel injection timing [EOI]) on engine-out, regulated (total HC, NOx, and CO) and speciated HC emissions have been investigated for a 1.83 L direct-injection, spark-ignition (DISI) engine. As the EOI is varied over the range from high to low stratification with other engine parameters held constant, the mole fractions of all regulated emissions vary sharply over relatively small (10-20 crank angle degrees [CAD]) changes in EOI, suggesting that emissions are very sensitive to the evaporation, mixing, and motion of the stratified fuel cloud prior to ignition. The contribution of unburned fuel to the HC emissions decreases while the olefinic partial oxidation products increase as the fuel stratification increases, increasing the smog reactivity of the HC in the exhaust gas by 25%.
Technical Paper

Interaction of Sulfur with Automotive Catalysts and the Impact on Vehicle Emissions-A Review

1999-05-03
1999-01-1543
The requirement to meet more stringent emission standards has focused attention on the effects of gasoline sulfur on automotive emissions. Numerous studies have shown that three-way catalyst performance is severely inhibited by sulfur. A literature review of laboratory studies on the interaction of sulfur with automotive catalyst components provides the basis for understanding impacts on catalyst activity under the variety of conditions encountered in vehicle operation. Under stoichiometric and rich conditions, SO2 formed during combustion is dissociatively adsorbed on platinum group metal surfaces to form strongly bound Sad. Sulfur inhibition results from both physical blockage and electronic effects of Sad, such that low coverage of Sad results in disproportionately higher levels of reaction site blockage. This is responsible for the nonlinear effects observed with increasing fuel sulfur level.
Technical Paper

EC-Diesel Technology Validation Program Interim Report

2000-06-19
2000-01-1854
ARCO has developed diesel fuel called Emission Control Diesel (EC-D) that results in substantially lower exhaust emissions compared to a typical California diesel fuel. EC-D has ultra-low sulfur content, low aromatics, and has a high cetane number. EC-D is produced from typical crude oil using a conventional refining process. Initial engine laboratory tests and vehicle tests indicated that EC-D reduced regulated emissions while maintaining fuel economy, compared to a typical California diesel fuel. Ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels such as EC-D may enable the widespread use of passive catalyzed particulate filters for both new and existing diesel engines. The use of catalyzed particulate filters could allow large reductions of particulate matter emitted from vehicles. A one-year technology validation program is being run to evaluate EC-D and catalyzed particulate filters using diesel vehicles operating in Southern California.
Technical Paper

Tailpipe Emissions Comparison Between Propane and Natural Gas Forklifts

2000-06-19
2000-01-1865
It is commonly stated that natural gas-fueled forklifts produce less emissions than propane-fueled forklifts. However, there is relatively little proof. This paper reports on a detailed comparative study at one plant in Edmonton, Canada where a fleet of forklift trucks is used for indoor material movement. (For convenience, the acronym NGV, ie. Natural Gas Vehicle is used to designate natural gas-fueled and LPG, ie. Liquified Petroleum Gas, is used to designate propane-fueled forklifts). Until recently the forklift trucks (of various ages) were LPG carburetted units with two-way catalytic converters. Prompted partially by worker health concerns, the forklifts were converted to fuel injected, closed-loop controlled NGV systems with three-way catalytic converters. The NGV-converted forklifts reduced emissions by 77% (NOX) and 76% (CO) when compared to just-tuned LPG forklifts.
Technical Paper

The Systematic Evaluation of Twelve LP Gas Fuels for Emissions and Fuel Consumption

2000-06-19
2000-01-1867
The effects on bi-fuel car exhaust emissions, fuel consumption and acceleration performance of a range of LPG fuels has been determined. The LPGs tested included those representing natural gas condensate and oil refineries' products to include a spectrum of C3:C4 and paraffiinic:olefinic mixtures. The overall conclusions are that exhaust emissions from the gaseous fuels for the three-way catalyst equipped cars tested were lower than for gasoline. For all the LPGs, CO2 equivalent emissions are reduced by 7% to 10% or more compared with gasoline. The cars' acceleration performance indicates that there was no sacrifice in acceleration times to various speeds, with any gaseous fuel in these OEM developed cars.
Technical Paper

Supercharged Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) with Exhaust Gas Recirculation and Pilot Fuel

2000-06-19
2000-01-1835
In an attempt to extend the upper load limit for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), supercharging in combination with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) have been applied. Two different boost pressures were used, 1.1 bar and 1.5 bar. High EGR rates were used in order to reduce the combustion rate. The highest obtained IMEP was 16 bar. This was achieved with the higher boost pressure, at close to stoichiometric conditions and with approximately 50 % EGR. Natural gas was used as the main fuel. In the case with the higher boost pressure, iso-octane was used as pilot fuel, to improve the ignition properties of the mixture. This made it possible to use a lower compression ratio and thereby reducing the maximum cylinder pressure. The tests were performed on a single cylinder engine operated at low speed (1000 rpm). The test engine was equipped with a modified cylinder head, having a Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) mechanism.
Technical Paper

On-Board Hydrogen Generation for Rapid Catalyst Light-Off

2000-06-19
2000-01-1841
This paper describes an on-vehicle demonstration of a hydrogen-heated catalyst (HHC) system for reducing the level of cold-start hydrocarbon emissions from a gasoline-fueled light-duty vehicle. The HHC system incorporated an onboard electrolyzer that generates and stores hydrogen (H2) during routine vehicle operation. Stored hydrogen and supplemental air are injected upstream of a platinum-containing automotive catalyst when the engine is started. Rapid heating of the catalytic converter occurs immediately as a result of catalytic oxidation of hydrogen (H2) with oxygen (O2) on the catalyst surface. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emission results of the hydrogen-heated catalyst-equipped vehicle demonstrated reductions of hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) up to 68 and 62 percent, respectively. This study includes a brief analysis of the emissions and fuel economy effects of a 10-minute period of hydrogen generation during the FTP.
Technical Paper

UltraThin Wall Catalyst Solutions at Similar Restriction and Precious Metal Loading

2000-06-19
2000-01-1844
FTP and ECE + EUDC emissions are measured from six converters having similar restriction and platinum group metals on two 1999 prototype engines/calibrations. A 2.2L four cylinder prototype vehicle is used to measure FTP emissions and an auto-driver dynamometer with a prototype 2.4L four cylinder engine is used to determine the ECE + EUDC emissions. The catalytic converters use various combinations of 400/3.5 (400cpsi/3.5mil wall), 400/4.5, 400/6.5, 600/3.5, 600/4.5, and 900/2.5 ceramic substrates in order to meet a restriction target and to maximize converter geometric surface area. Total catalyst volume of the converters varies from 1.9 to 0.82 liters. Catalyst frontal area varies from 68 cm2 to 88 cm2. Five of the six converters use two catalyst bricks. The front catalyst brick uses either a three-way Pd washcoat technology containing ceria or a non-ceria Pd washcoat technology. Pd loadings are 0.1 troy oz. of Pd.
Technical Paper

Hydrocarbon (HC) Reduction of Exhaust Gases from a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Using Different Catalytic Mesh-Coatings

2000-06-19
2000-01-1847
A FeCrAlloy mesh-type catalyst has been used to reduce hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from a 4-stroke HCCI engine. Significant for the HCCI engine is a high compression ratio and lean mixtures, which leads to a high efficiency, low combustion temperatures and thereby low NOx emissions, <5 pmm, but also low exhaust temperatures, around 300°C. It becomes critical to: 1. Ensure that the HCCI-combustion generates as low HC emissions as possible, this can be done by very precise control of engine inlet conditions and, if possible, compression ratio. 2. Ensure that the exhaust temperature is high enough, without loosing efficiency or producing NOx; in order to get an oxidizing catalyst to work. 3. Select proper catalyst material for the catalyst so that the exhaust temperature can be as low as possible.
Technical Paper

Ultra Low Emissions and High Performance Diesel Combustion with a Combination of High EGR, Three-Way Catalyst, and a Highly Oxygenated Fuel, Dimethoxy Methane (DMM)

2000-06-19
2000-01-1819
Ultra low emissions and high performance combustion was achieved with a combination of high EGR, a three-way catalyst, and a highly oxygenated liquid fuel, neat dimethoxy methane (DMM), in an ordinary DI diesel engine. The smokeless nature of neat DMM effectively allowed stoichiometric diesel combustion by controlling BMEP with EGR. NOx, THC, and CO emissions were reduced with a three-way catalyst. At lower BMEP with excess air, the EGR effectively reduced NOx. High-speed video in a bottom view type engine revealed that luminous flame decreased with increased fuel oxygen content and almost disappeared with DMM.
Technical Paper

Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment

2000-04-02
2000-01-1601
There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry.
Technical Paper

Influence of the EGR Rate, Oxygen Concentration and Equivalent Fuel/Air Ratio on the Combustion Behaviour and Pollutant Emissions of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

2000-06-19
2000-01-1813
New future emission regulations for HD Diesel engines in Europe will require a further reduction in NOx and particulate emission levels compared with nowadays values. The work presented here is an analysis of the EGR influence on the DI Diesel combustion process, based upon a parametric study combining cooled EGR with intake pressure increase. The independent variation of EGR rate and intake pressure allows to analyse the influence of the oxygen concentration and the equivalent fuel/air ratio on the combustion process in an independent way. Tests were performed with a 1.8 litre single-cylinder engine. The study combines performance and emissions measurements together with heat release law analysis. Five representative operative conditions from the European Steady - state test Cycle (ESC) have been considered. For each one, EGR rate (from 0 to 30%) and intake pressure (from 0 to 0.03 MPa over nominal pressure) have been varied independently.
Technical Paper

New Quiescent Combustion System for Heavy–Duty Diesel Engines to Overcome Exhaust Emissions and Fuel Consumption Trade–Off

2000-06-19
2000-01-1811
In the next few years, the USA, EU, and Japan plan to introduce very stringent exhaust emissions regulations for heavy–duty diesel engines, in order to enhance the protection air quality. This builds upon the heavy–duty diesel engine exhaust emissions regulations already in effect. At the same time, improvement in fuel consumption of heavy–duty diesel engines will be very important for lowering vehicle operating costs, conserving fossil fuel resources, and reduction of CO2 (greenhouse gas) levels. This paper presents a detailed review of a quiescent combustion system for a heavy–duty diesel engine, which offers breakthrough performance in terms of the exhaust emissions – fuel consumption trade–off, compared with the more conventional swirl supported combustion system. This conclusion is supported by experimental results comparing quiescent and swirl supported versions of various combustion system configurations.
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