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Video

Visionary's Take: An Engineering Journey into the Marketplace (Part 3 of 3)

2017-10-12
Can you become a visionary or are you born one? How does a visionary capture an opportunity and makes it a successful business? Are engineers more qualified to solve technical problems or run companies? SAE's "The Visionary's Take" addresses these and many other questions, by talking directly with those who have dared to tackle difficult engineering problems, and create real-life products out of their experience. In these short episodes, Sanjiv Singh and Lyle Chamberlain, respectively CEO and Chief Engineer from Near Earth Autonomy, talk about their experience in creating a brand-new company in the UAV world. Founded in 2011, Near Earth Autonomy brought together a group of engineers and roboticists, looking for unconventional solutions to very hard logistics problems, presenting danger to human life. The answers were developed by pushing technology to a higher level, testing quickly and often, and keeping an open mind to alternative ways of framing engineering challenges.
Video

Visionary's Take: An Engineering Journey into the Marketplace (Part 1 of 3)

2017-10-12
Can you become a visionary or are you born one? How does a visionary capture an opportunity and makes it a successful business? Are engineers more qualified to solve technical problems or run companies? SAE's "The Visionary's Take" addresses these and many other questions, by talking directly with those who have dared to tackle difficult engineering problems, and create real-life products out of their experience. In these short episodes, Sanjiv Singh and Lyle Chamberlain, respectively CEO and Chief Engineer from Near Earth Autonomy, talk about their experience in creating a brand-new company in the UAV world. Founded in 2011, Near Earth Autonomy brought together a group of engineers and roboticists, looking for unconventional solutions to very hard logistics problems, presenting danger to human life. The answers were developed by pushing technology to a higher level, testing quickly and often, and keeping an open mind to alternative ways of framing engineering challenges.
Technical Paper

Duralumin All-Metal Airplane Construction

1928-01-01
280030
PSYCHOLOGY of the public, as well as engineering structure and aerodynamics, is involved in commercial aviation. The public has confidence in metal. With quantity production in view, the author and his associates considered costs of production as related to quantity and also costs of maintenance at airports and in the field, and chose metal as the material of construction. Structural members are fashioned from sheet duralumin rather than from tubes and a type of construction was evolved that can be made with the minimum investment in tools, that is cheap to put together and that can be repaired with the smallest amount of equipment and labor. For compression loads, duralumin has a great deal more strength for a given weight than has steel. It cannot be used, however, for compression members in combination with steel in tension members because of the difference in coefficient of expansion.
Technical Paper

Development of a Heavy-Duty V-12 Engine

1932-01-01
320052
REASONS for designing an engine with 12 cylinders for fire apparatus, motor-trucks and motor-coaches are set forth by the author. Among them were the requirement for 225 hp., a speed range of 200 to 3000 r.p.m. with little torsional vibration and torque-reaction effect, and economy of space. The design adopted has its cylinders in two rows of six each, disposed at an included angle of 30 deg. The statement is made that it can be installed in the space occupied by a 150-hp. six-cylinder engine. Advantages claimed for setting the cylinders at this angle are that the engine can be made narrow, so that all cylinders and the crankcase can be cast in one block; that the accessories can conveniently be placed outside; and that the synchronism of impulses that causes torsional vibration can be avoided. Vertical valves are operated from a central over-head camshaft by rocker arms that carry rollers at one end and are split horizontally at the other end.
Technical Paper

REAR AXLES FOR TRUCKS

1923-01-01
230043
The five types of final-drive now in use on motor vehicles are stated by the author to be (a) the chain-and-sprocket, (b) the bevel-gear, (c) the worm-gear, (d) the double-reduction and (e) the internal-gear. The advantages of each type as emphasized by its maker are presented and commented upon, and the same procedure is followed with reference to their disadvantages. Following these comparisons of the different drives, which cover about the first third of the paper, the bearing loads and shaft stresses of typical semi-floating and full-floating axles are calculated for the conditions (a) maximum torque plus the normal radial-load on the wheel, (b) the wheel locked and skidding forward when the brakes are applied and (c) the wheel skidding sidewise while the truck is moving. A tabulation of the results obtained from the mathematical calculations is included.
Technical Paper

TAXICAB-BODY CONSTRUCTION1

1923-01-01
230015
The author states briefly the phenomenal growth of taxicab usage and consequent demand for this type of motor vehicle, mentioned the differences in body requirements for taxicabs as compared with those of passenger cars, and describes the methods used to secure durability in taxicab-body construction to discount the severe service to which the body is subjected. Tabular data are presented and comments made regarding the woods that are suitable for body framework, and the methods of joining frame members and reinforcing frame joints are outlined. The desirable types of roof and the factors that influence design are discussed at some length, illustrations being presented also, and minor considerations, such as types of hardware, dash and instrument-boards, are included. A brief summary states present conditions, and a bibliographical list is appended of informative publications relating to the subject.
Technical Paper

INVESTIGATION OF HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK DRIVE-AXLES1

1923-01-01
230017
A record of an investigation of heavy-duty truck-axles carried out by the Bureau of Standards at the request of the motor transport division of the Quartermaster Corps, this paper deals in particular with the mechanical efficiency of the axles tested. The investigation included, in addition to several worm-drive Class-B Army-truck axles with different types of bearing, a number of axles usually designated respectively as “internal-gear” and “multiple-reduction” type. Each of these types was represented by axles in successful use in commercial trucks of 5-ton rating. In analyzing the results of the tests it was found possible to separate the losses into no-load losses and load losses; the total loss being the sum of these two. In general, the no-load losses were primarily controlled by the viscosity and the method of application of the lubricant. They were greater in those axles in which the parts rotating at high speeds were immersed most completely in the lubricant.
Technical Paper

SOME PROBLEMS IN AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION

1917-01-01
170001
The authors advance for discussion some important problems in the construction of airplanes for military use in this country. The functions of military airplanes designed for strategical and tactical reconnaissance, control of artillery fire and for pursuit are outlined. Problems in construction with reference to the two-propeller system, methods of reducing vibration, application of starting motors, details of the gasoline supply-system, metal construction for airplanes, flexible piping, desirable characteristics of mufflers, shock absorbers, landing gear, fire safety-devices, control of cooling-water temperature, variable camber wings, variable pitch propellers and propeller stresses, are all given consideration. The paper is concluded with suggestions for improvement in design relating to the use of bearing shims, the rigidity of crankcase castings, interchangeability of parts and better detail construction in the oiling, ignition, fuel supply and cooling systems.
Technical Paper

LESSONS OF THE WAR IN TRUCK DESIGN

1917-01-01
170027
The title of this paper fully indicates its scope. The author presents an intimate picture of conditions prevailing at the war front which affect the operation and maintenance of war trucks, and these two factors in turn indicate the trend that design should take. The training of the mechanical transport personnel of the Army is also gone into at some length. The English and American trucks used earlier in the war consisted of about nineteen different makes and forty-two totally different models, resulting in a very serious problem of providing spare parts and maintenance in general. In the British Army transportation comes under an Army Service Corps officer called the Director of Transport and Supplies. At the outbreak of the war these officers had had little mechanical experience, horses being employed principally. In the French Army motor vehicles were used to a greater extent before the war, under the artillery command.
Technical Paper

CONSTRUCTION OF JUNKERS ENGINE

1917-01-01
170048
The author, from a first-hand study of this engine in the laboratory of Professor Junkers, traces the progress of the developmental work, and discusses the methods of operating the engine, its present status, its application to airplanes, trucks and tractors, details of marine and stationary types, fuel, advantages of and objections to the double-piston construction, and describes at some length the various parts entering into the construction of this type of engine. In conclusion, he summarizes the fundamental advantages of the Junkers engine.
Technical Paper

FUNDAMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING TRACTOR DESIGN

1920-01-01
200061
The farm tractor is finding itself among the most essential of mechanical agricultural devices; the industry is young, and controlling basic factors of design are not yet completely crystallized, nor has research had its proper share in the development. Some further factors of the author's earlier article on tractor plowing speeds2 are discussed in this paper. The earlier article dealt chiefly with plowing data on the assumption that there was delivered at the drawbar of the tractor a constant horsepower. This paper starts with a normal condition of a constant engine power which is to be delivered to the crankshaft under governor control for any of the travel speeds analyzed. The tractor is considered as powered by a given brake-horsepower engine, this power being transmitted through sets of gears in which the net bearing and gear efficiency is taken to be 73 per cent.
Technical Paper

TRACTOR WEIGHT AND DRAWBAR PULL

1920-01-01
200080
The best weight for a tractor of given horsepower must be a compromise based upon a mean of the many conditions to be encountered by a given machine or by different machines of the same model. While the weight logically will bear some relation to the drawbar pull, the latter in turn depends upon tractor speed. The next item is weight distribution, which requires the utmost skill of the designer; this is elaborated and diagrams are shown of tractors operating in comparatively firm and in soft ground, ascending a grade and when the drive-wheels are mired. The four-wheel-drive tractor requires a modification of the foregoing analysis and the diagrams are applied to afford a similar analysis for this type. The author's conclusion is that, while careful engineering will make the light-weight tractor of conventional type stable under most conditions, there is a possibility that any future trend toward lighter machines will open the field to other types.
Technical Paper

FIFTH-WHEEL MOUNTINGS ON TRACTOR SEMITRAILERS

1948-01-01
480211
IT seems desirable to increase appreciably the amount of kingpin offset in tractor semitrailer combinations, according to Mr. Horine, who discusses the effect of kingpin offset on load distribution, clearance angle, traction, braking, steering, maneuverability, and riding qualities. The author also explores the geometric limits on how far ahead of the tractor axle the kingpin may be placed.
Technical Paper

Current Practice in Tractor Bevel Gears

1952-01-01
520253
THE design and application of tractor bevel gears is covered in this paper. The authors discuss the problems involved, under the following headings: 1. Basic bevel-gear systems in use, based upon the method of cutting. 2. Method of calculation and selection of factors determining the static and maximum tensile stresses. 3. Summary of static and maximum tensile stresses, and fatigue life analysis. 4. Materials and heat-treatment.
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