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Technical Paper

Reconstruction of the Cylinder Pressure from Vibration Measurements for Prediction of Exhaust and Noise Emissions in Ethanol Engines

1999-05-17
1999-01-1658
There are growing demands for condition monitoring of IC engines, and therefore any method in order to improve the performance of the engines ought to be evaluated. This paper proposes a new approach for the prediction and optimisation of noise and exhaust emissions in IC engines. The idea is to reconstruct the cylinder pressure from vibration measurements on the engine surface by using the complex cepstrum method [3, 4]. The reconstructed cylinder pressure is further used as input in Multivariate models, based on cylinder pressure, for estimating noise and exhaust emissions. This paper demonstrates the applicability of the method for modelling of noise and exhaust emissions
Technical Paper

Considerations About Chaotic Dynamics of Exhaust Tube and its Design Optimization in Respect to its Dynamic Properties

1999-05-17
1999-01-1657
Vibration of an exhaust tube with a non-linear fixing construction is analyzed. Numerical and laser holography investigation methods are used for the determination of vibration processes happening nearby the cylinder fixing areas. Obviously, the analyzed non-linear system can produce complex reactions even to harmonic excitations. The knowledge about such zones of “wrong” dynamic behavior may help to eliminate and reduce higher noise levels and extend the lifetime of the construction.
Technical Paper

A Model For Estimating Oil Vaporization From The Cylinder Liner As A Contributing Mechanism to Engine Oil Consumption

1999-05-03
1999-01-1520
A model has been developed for estimating the oil vaporization rate from the cylinder liner of a reciprocating engine. The model uses input from an external cycle simulator and an external liner oil film thickness model. It allows for the change in oil composition and the change in oil film thickness due to vaporization. It also estimates how the passage of the compression and scraper rings combine with the vaporization to influence the steady-state composition of the oil layer in the upper ring pack. Computer model results are presented for a compression-ignition engine using a range of liner temperatures, several engine speeds, and two different oils. Vaporization is found to be highly dependent on liner temperature and steady-state oil composition. The steady-state oil composition near the top of the cylinder is found to be significantly different than the composition of the oil near the bottom of the cylinder.
Technical Paper

Effects of Injection Timing and Fuel Properties on Exhaust Odor in DI Diesel Engines

1999-05-03
1999-01-1531
Exhaust odor of DI diesel engines is worse than that of gasoline engines, especially at low temperatures and at idling. As the number of passenger cars with DI diesel engines is increasing worldwide because of their low CO2 emissions, odor reduction research of DI diesel engines is important. Incomplete combustion is a major cause of exhaust odor. Generally, odor worsens due to overleaning of the mixture in the cylinder and due to fuel adhering on the combustion chamber walls. To confirm this, the influences of different engine running conditions and fuel properties were investigated. The reason for the changes in exhaust odor with injection timing is evaluated by considerations of optimum positions of the maximum heat release. With n-heptane, a low boiling point fuel, odorous emissions increase because of overleaning of the mixture.
Technical Paper

Two-Dimensional In-Cylinder Flow Field in a Natural Gas Fueled Spark Ignition Engine Probed by Particle Tracking Velocimetry and Its Dependence on Engine Specifications

1999-05-03
1999-01-1534
An experimental study was made to investigate in-cylinder flow field in a natural gas fueled spark ignition engine and the effects of engine specifications on in-cylinder flow field. The instantaneous two-dimentional flow fields in a single-cylinder visualization engine, which has 75mm bore and 62mm stroke, were measured in various cross sections perpendicular to the cylinder axis by using the laser light sheet PTV method at various crank angles during intake, compression, and expansion strokes over the wide range of piston combustion chamber configuration, top clearance, and nominal swirl ratio. Flow fields during compression and expansion strokes were also calculated using KIVA2 simulation code for better understanding of the measured results. The results showed that induction-generated swirl is getting concentric to the cylinder center in compression stroke, and is shifted in the radial direction in expansion stroke.
Technical Paper

Gas Flows Through the Inter-Ring Crevice and Their Influence on UHC Emissions

1999-05-03
1999-01-1533
Influence of the inter-ring crevice, the volume between the top and second piston rings, on unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emission was experimentally and numerically investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to estimate the level of UHC emission induced by the blow-up of inter-ring mixture, i.e., unburned gases trapped in the inter-ring crevice. In the experiments, the inter-ring mixture was extracted to the crankcase during the late period of expansion and the early period of exhaust stroke through the engraved grooves on the lower part of cylinder wall. Extraction of the mixture resulted in the significant reductions of UHC emission in proportion to the increments of blowby flow rate, without any losses in efficiency and power. This experimental study has confirmed the importance of inter-ring crevice on UHC emission in an SI engine and established a relationship between the inter-ring mixture and UHC emission.
Technical Paper

Effects of Fuel Properties on Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine

2000-06-19
2000-01-1851
This study investigates the effects of fuel properties on combustion characteristics and emissions such as NOx, smoke, THC and particulates in a direct-injection diesel engine. Fuel properties, such as cetane number and aromatic content, are varied independently in the experiments to separate their effects. The engine tests are carried out at steady operation with changed load, injection timing and injection pressure. The results show that reducing cetane number results in the increase of NOx and decrease of particulate emission at high load. This is because the low cetane number fuel has the long ignition delay and causes the high maximum heat release rate and the short combustion duration. However, high THC emission is produced at low load for the low cetane number fuel.
Technical Paper

Supercharged Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) with Exhaust Gas Recirculation and Pilot Fuel

2000-06-19
2000-01-1835
In an attempt to extend the upper load limit for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), supercharging in combination with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) have been applied. Two different boost pressures were used, 1.1 bar and 1.5 bar. High EGR rates were used in order to reduce the combustion rate. The highest obtained IMEP was 16 bar. This was achieved with the higher boost pressure, at close to stoichiometric conditions and with approximately 50 % EGR. Natural gas was used as the main fuel. In the case with the higher boost pressure, iso-octane was used as pilot fuel, to improve the ignition properties of the mixture. This made it possible to use a lower compression ratio and thereby reducing the maximum cylinder pressure. The tests were performed on a single cylinder engine operated at low speed (1000 rpm). The test engine was equipped with a modified cylinder head, having a Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) mechanism.
Technical Paper

UltraThin Wall Catalyst Solutions at Similar Restriction and Precious Metal Loading

2000-06-19
2000-01-1844
FTP and ECE + EUDC emissions are measured from six converters having similar restriction and platinum group metals on two 1999 prototype engines/calibrations. A 2.2L four cylinder prototype vehicle is used to measure FTP emissions and an auto-driver dynamometer with a prototype 2.4L four cylinder engine is used to determine the ECE + EUDC emissions. The catalytic converters use various combinations of 400/3.5 (400cpsi/3.5mil wall), 400/4.5, 400/6.5, 600/3.5, 600/4.5, and 900/2.5 ceramic substrates in order to meet a restriction target and to maximize converter geometric surface area. Total catalyst volume of the converters varies from 1.9 to 0.82 liters. Catalyst frontal area varies from 68 cm2 to 88 cm2. Five of the six converters use two catalyst bricks. The front catalyst brick uses either a three-way Pd washcoat technology containing ceria or a non-ceria Pd washcoat technology. Pd loadings are 0.1 troy oz. of Pd.
Technical Paper

Performance Development of the First European Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Equipped with Full Electronic High Injection Pressure Common Rail System

2000-06-19
2000-01-1821
Over the last few years, Renault VI has gained an important knowledge in low emissions combustion optimization using the high injection pressure Common Rail system. A completely new six cylinder in-line DCI 11 engine has been designed with this full electronic injection system for EURO3 truck applications. The engine performance has been optimized to reach low fuel consumption and low emissions, while keeping customer utilization in mind. After a short view on the general features of the new engine, the highly flexible injection system is presented as well as its potential to control fuel injection timing, fuel quantity and pressure with multiple injections, independently of engine speed and load. The development process is described, covering the swirl design with two inlet ports per cylinder, the injector and combustion bowl geometry match and the injection data optimization.
Technical Paper

The Single Cylinder OM441LA

2000-06-19
2000-01-1826
This paper will describe the design criteria for a single cylinder version of the Daimler-Chrysler OM441LA engine, which is currently used in multicylinder form as a key test in the ACEA A4 and A5 Oil Sequences. A test procedure has been developed for the single cylinder which provides results correlating with its multicylinder counterpart. The historical development of the procedure, correlation data, and economic benefits of use will be presented.
Technical Paper

Experimental Investigation of an Optical Direct Injection S.I. Engine Using Fuel-Air Ratio Laser Induced Fluorescence

2000-06-19
2000-01-1794
To provide fuel/air ratio quantitative measurements in an S.I engines, a transparent cylinder engine is investigated with the Fuel-Air Ratio Laser Induced Fluorescence (FARLIF) technique. In a homogeneous mixture, the two dimensional distribution for the fuel/air ratio is calibrated and measured during the compression stroke for different equivalence ratios. After spark ignition, the combustion zone and the flame front are visualized by laser sheet LIF. The direct-injection stratified-charge, new concept for gasoline engines is investigated with FARLIF. In the direct injection gasoline engine where the fuel is directly injected into a cylinder and the flow is highly turbulent, two injection timings are used: -early injection (i.e. during the intake stroke) to promote a homogeneous distribution; -late injection during the compression stroke, to generate a ultra-lean stratified charge.
Technical Paper

Development of a Piston Ring-Cylinder Bore Wear Model

2000-06-19
2000-01-1788
In an internal combustion engine, the wear in the piston ring/cylinder bore contact initially increases rapidly due to run-in and then attains a steady state during which the engine spends most of its useful life. This paper describes the development of an abrasive wear model for both cylinder bore and piston rings for the steady state period. The model took into account shear thinning of the lubricant, but it did not consider the effects of transient operations, geometry changes due to bore distortions, ring twist, ring motion, and corrosion. The model predicted the bore wear depth distribution from the top dead center (TDC) to the bottom dead center (BDC) and ring wear depth under different operating conditions. The maximum bore wear depth was predicted to occur at about 20 degrees after TDC where the combustion gas pressure reached its peak value. The model predicted an increase in bore and ring wear depth with increasing engine speed.
Technical Paper

Incorporation of Lubricant Shear-Thinning in a Two-Dimensional Lubrication Analysis for Automotive Piston-Ring Packs

2000-06-19
2000-01-1786
Piston-ring packs are major components of automotive engines. These engines are commonly lubricated with multigrade oils, which usually exhibit a non-Newtonian (shear-thinning) behaviour. That is, their viscosity decreases with an increase in shear rate. Consequently, this will effect the tribological performance of piston-ring packs. In this work, a two-space-dimensional lubrication model of piston-ring packs developed initially for Newtonian lubricants has been extended to include the effect of lubricant shear-thinning. A modified power-law model was used to characterise the lubricant shear-thinning behaviour, and it was incorporated in an existing flow-continuity algorithm, which forms the base of the current ring pack lubrication model. The extended lubrication model has been verified with published experimental results. Good agreement between theory and experiment has been achieved in terms of friction mean effective pressure (fmep).
Technical Paper

A Case Study of Cylinder-Liner Wear in Relation to “Varnish” Films in a Large Long-Stroke Marine Diesel Engine

2000-06-19
2000-01-1783
Results of a case study in which an unusual liner wear pattern is seen to form within the cylinders of a large marine diesel engine are presented. Analysis of the wear patterns and the wear surfaces are also presented which reveal that the maximum wear corresponds to regions on the liner where “varnish” or “lacquer” films appear to build up from decomposition products of the fuel and lubricants employed. Possible reasons for such wear and film formation are discussed, and compared with frictional and thermal analyses of the ring-liner contacts under operating conditions, with and without the presence of lacquer films. Preliminary results suggest that such films can act as insulation layers to frictionally generated heat between rings and liner, and if allowed to become thick enough can lead to scuffing.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of Tribological Characteristics of Energy-Conserving Engine Oils Using a Reciprocating Bench Test

2000-06-19
2000-01-1781
Engine design and tribology engineers are constantly challenged to develop advanced products with reduced weight, reduced friction, longer life, and higher engine operating temperatures. The resulting engine systems must also meet more demanding emissions and fuel economy targets. Advanced energy-conserving lubricants and surface coatings are concurrently evolving to meet the needs of new engine materials. Because of the enormous cost and time associated with engine testing, much interest is being focused on the development of representative and repeatable bench tests for evaluation of engine materials and lubricants. The authors have developed a bench test employing reciprocating motion for evaluating friction and energy-conserving characteristics of lubricants.
Technical Paper

Piston Ring Cylinder Liner Scuffing Phenomenon Studies Using Acoustic Emission Technique

2000-06-19
2000-01-1782
In spite of being a popular topic in technical publications, scuffing between a piston ring face and the cylinder liner is an extremely unpredictable and hard-to-reproduce phenomenon that significantly decreases engine performance. The scuffing phenomenon described as the transfer of cylinder liner particles to piston ring surfaces due to inadequate lubrication and high temperature at top dead center could significantly decrease engine performance. The mechanism of scuffing origin and subsequent catastrophic seizure usually is evaluated by coefficient of friction measurements. The purpose of this paper is (1) to examine the usefulness of acoustic emission RMS measurements generated during testing that results from the friction between piston ring and cylinder liner segments and (2) to establish the relationship between such signals and different levels of the scuffing phenomenon.
Technical Paper

Stratified Scavenging Applied to a Small Capacity Two-Stroke Scooter for the Reduction of Fuel Consumption and Emissions

1999-09-28
1999-01-3271
The advantages of high power to density ratio and low manufacturing costs of a two-stroke engine compared to a four-stroke unit make it currently the most widely used engine type for 50cc displacement 2-wheelers. This dominance is threatened by increasingly severe exhaust emissions legislation, forcing manufactures to develop their two-stroke engines to comply with the legislation. This paper describes a simple solution to reduce these harmful emissions in a cost effective manner, for a scooter application. The method of stratified scavenging is achieved by delivering the fuel into the rear transfer passage from a remote mechanical fuel metering device, operated by intake manifold pressure. Air only is delivered into the cylinder from the remaining transfer passages which are directed towards the rear transfer port, thus impeding the fuel from reaching the exhaust during the scavenging process.
Technical Paper

An Assessment of a Stratified Scavenging Process Applied to a Loop Scavenged Two-Stroke Engine

1999-09-28
1999-01-3272
Stratified scavenging has been applied to two-stroke engines to improve fuel consumption and reduce exhaust emissions. To evaluation how this is achieved a stratified scavenging process was simulated using a three-gas single-cycle scavenging apparatus. The experiment simulated the fuel stream entering the rear transfer port of a five port cylinder and air streams entering the remaining ports. The scavenging efficiency and fuel trapping are calculated after the cycle by examining the cylinder contents. The design of the apparatus is particularly suited to investigating cylinder design changes during the prototype stage of engine development. A simulation of the stratified scavenging experiment using the Computational Fluid dynamics (CFD) code VECTIS, showed good correlation with measured results. The simulation provides a real insight into the cylinder flow behaviour of the separate fuel and air streams entering the cylinder.
Technical Paper

SCIP Simplified Direct Injection for Low Emissions Small Two-Stroke Engines

1999-09-28
1999-01-3289
The IAPAC Direct fuel Injection (DI) system, developed by IFP, has already well proven its capability to reduce pollutants emissions and fuel consumption of 2-stroke engines. This crankcase Compressed Air Assisted Fuel Injection Process allowing the introduction of the fuel separately from the scavenging air, minimizes the fuel short-circuiting. In earlier works, results of the implementation of the IAPAC system on cylinder displacement from 125 cc to 400 cc have been presented in various papers. These first prototypes were all using a camshaft to drive the IAPAC DI poppet valve, which was considered as a limitation for applying this system to small displacement 2-stroke engines. The new SCIP™ system is no more using a camshaft neither driveshaft, or any electric power supply to drive the DI air assisted injection valve.
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