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Technical Paper

Optimisation of Diesel Engines Converted to High Compression Spark Ignition (SI) Natural Gas Operation

1988-03-01
871149
There is a strong interest around the world in natural gas as an alternative fuel. This paper is concerned with the option of converting diesel engines to spark ignition operation. Although this may appear to be an outrageous thermodynamic action, it is preferable to using natural gas in a low compression gasoline engine conversion. An investigation is described in which engine maps were produced for a 5.6 litre direct injection diesel engine converted to CNG. The diesel operating characteristics have been compared with those of the spark ignition conversion at compression ratios of 18:1 (the original diesel value), 15:1 and 13:1. Detailed data are presented for the 15:1 compression ratio. These test results are supplemented by results for other diesel conversions. The use of these engines in bus fleet operations is also discussed.
Technical Paper

Trends and Forecasts for Turbocharging

1988-03-01
871147
Predictable and unpredictable forces will change the direction of the charge-air systems industry. The driver of diesel engine development will be the stringent emissions regulations of the 1990s. The drivers in the gasoline engine market will be improved fuel economy, performance, durability and emissions. Forces will also influence the charge-air marketplace, including changes in emission standards, national fiscal policies, political issues, fuel prices, alternate fuels and consumer tastes. The world community mandate for engines that are clean, quiet, durable and fuel efficient will be satisfied, increasingly, by first-tier component suppliers developing integrated systems solutions.
Technical Paper

Performance and Exhaust Emission in Spark Ignition Engine Fueled with Methanol-Butane Mixture

1988-03-01
871165
To improve the cold startability of methanol, methanol-butane mixed fuel was experimented. Engine performance and exhaust emissions are obtained with methanol-butane mixed fuel. These characteristics are compared with those of methanol and gasoline. The mixing ratios of methanol and butane are 50:50 (M50), 80:20 (M80), and 90:10 (M90) based on the calorific value. As a result, M90 produces more power than gasoline and more or less than methanol depending on the engine speed and the excess air ratio. Brake horse power of M90 is higher than that of gasoline by 5 - 10 %, and brake specific fuel consumption is smaller than that of gasoline by 17 % to the maximum based on the calorific value. NOx emission concentrations for M90 are lower than those for gasoline and higher than those for methanol because of the effect of butane, CO emission concentrations are somewhat lower than those for methanol and gasoline.
Technical Paper

What Fuel Economy Improvement Technologies Could Aid the Competitiveness of Light-Duty Natural Gas Vehicles?

1999-05-03
1999-01-1511
The question of whether increasing the fuel economy of light-duty natural gas fueled vehicles can improve their economic competitiveness in the U.S. market, and help the US Department of Energy meet stated goals for such vehicles is explored. Key trade-offs concerning costs, exhaust emissions and other issues are presented for a number of possible advanced engine designs. Projections of fuel economy improvements for a wide range of lean-burn engine technologies have been developed. It appears that compression ignition technologies can give the best potential fuel economy, but are less competitive for light-duty vehicles due to high engine cost. Lean-burn spark ignition technologies are more applicable to light-duty vehicles due to lower overall cost. Meeting Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle standards with efficient lean-burn natural gas engines is a key challenge.
Technical Paper

In-Use Emissions from Natural Gas Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles

1999-05-03
1999-01-1507
The objective of the work described here is to test the performance of closed-loop controlled, heavy-duty CNG engines in-use, on fuels of different methane content; and to compare their performance with similar diesel vehicles. Performance is measured in terms of pollutant emissions, fuel economy, and driveability. To achieve this objective, three buses powered by closed-loop controlled, dedicated natural gas engines were tested on the heavy-duty chassis dynamometer facility at the Colorado Institute for Fuels and High Altitude Engine Research (CIFER). Emissions of regulated pollutants (CO, NOx, PM, and THC or NMHC), as well as emissions of alde-hydes for some vehicles, are reported. Two fuels were employed: a high methane fuel (90%) and a low methane fuel (85%). It was found that the NOx, CO, and PM emissions for a given cycle and vehicle are essentially constant for different methane content fuels.
Technical Paper

Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel

1999-05-03
1999-01-1512
Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels.
Technical Paper

Interim Results from Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project

1999-05-03
1999-01-1505
The objective of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty trucks operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Data collection from up to eight sites is planned. Currently, the project has four sites: Raley's in Sacramento, CA (Kenworth, Cummins L10-300G, liquefied natural gas - LNG); Pima Gro Systems, Inc. in Fontana, CA (White/GMC, Caterpillar 3176B Dual-Fuel, compressed natural gas - CNG); Waste Management in Washington, PA (Mack, Mack E7G, LNG); and United Parcel Service in Hartford, CT (Freightliner Custom Chassis, Cummins B5.9G, CNG). This paper summarizes current data collection and evaluation results from this project.
Technical Paper

Effects of a Hybrid Fuel System with Diesel and Premixed DME/Methane Charge on Exhaust Emissions in a Small DI Diesel Engine

1999-05-03
1999-01-1509
Early stage combustion systems, with lean homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), have been studied, with the intent to decrease the pollutant emission characteristics of DI diesel engines. Early stage combustion enables drastic reductions in both nitrogen oxides (NOx) and smoke emission, but the operating load range is restricted, due to combustion phenomena, such as unsteady combustion and knocking. In this study, we explored the possibility of broadening the operating load range in HCCI and reducing pollutant emissions using Dimethyl Ether (DME) fumigated through the intake pipe. However, the improvements in load range were found to be less than 0.1 MPa in brake mean effective pressure (BMEP), even when compression ratios were reduced and Methane with high octane number was mixed. Therefore, a DME premixed charge could be used only at light loads. At heavier loads a hybrid fuel system with a DME premixed charge and diesel fuel injection is necessary.
Technical Paper

Methylal and Methylal-Diesel Blended Fuels for Use in Compression-Ignition Engines

1999-05-03
1999-01-1508
“Gas-to-liquids” catalytic conversion technologies show promise for liberating stranded natural gas reserves and for achieving energy diversity worldwide. Some gas-to-liquids products are used as transportation fuels and as blendstocks for upgrading crude-derived fuels. Methylal (CH3-O-CH2-O-CH3), also known as dimethoxymethane or DMM, is a gas-to-liquid chemical that has been evaluated for use as a diesel fuel component. Methylal contains 42% oxygen by weight and is soluble in diesel fuel. The physical and chemical properties of neat methylal and for blends of methylal in conventional diesel fuel are presented. Methylal was found to be more volatile than diesel fuel, and special precautions for distribution and fuel tank storage are discussed. Steady state engine tests were also performed using an unmodified Cummins B5.9 turbocharged diesel engine to examine the effect of methylal blend concentration on performance and emissions.
Technical Paper

The Optimum Design for Frictional Surface of Piston Ring of Engines

1999-05-03
1999-01-1526
Based on the principle of conjugate curve surface and the theory of hydrodynamic lubrication, the similar spherical spiral surface, which has the best lubrication effect, was obtained in the paper. Experiment show, this kind of frictional surface is lower 15% at power loss, and it is higher 13% at service life than the traditional frictional surface of piston ring, (such as barrel, stepped, cuneiform, rectangle and so on).
Technical Paper

Two-Dimensional In-Cylinder Flow Field in a Natural Gas Fueled Spark Ignition Engine Probed by Particle Tracking Velocimetry and Its Dependence on Engine Specifications

1999-05-03
1999-01-1534
An experimental study was made to investigate in-cylinder flow field in a natural gas fueled spark ignition engine and the effects of engine specifications on in-cylinder flow field. The instantaneous two-dimentional flow fields in a single-cylinder visualization engine, which has 75mm bore and 62mm stroke, were measured in various cross sections perpendicular to the cylinder axis by using the laser light sheet PTV method at various crank angles during intake, compression, and expansion strokes over the wide range of piston combustion chamber configuration, top clearance, and nominal swirl ratio. Flow fields during compression and expansion strokes were also calculated using KIVA2 simulation code for better understanding of the measured results. The results showed that induction-generated swirl is getting concentric to the cylinder center in compression stroke, and is shifted in the radial direction in expansion stroke.
Technical Paper

Gas Flows Through the Inter-Ring Crevice and Their Influence on UHC Emissions

1999-05-03
1999-01-1533
Influence of the inter-ring crevice, the volume between the top and second piston rings, on unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emission was experimentally and numerically investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to estimate the level of UHC emission induced by the blow-up of inter-ring mixture, i.e., unburned gases trapped in the inter-ring crevice. In the experiments, the inter-ring mixture was extracted to the crankcase during the late period of expansion and the early period of exhaust stroke through the engraved grooves on the lower part of cylinder wall. Extraction of the mixture resulted in the significant reductions of UHC emission in proportion to the increments of blowby flow rate, without any losses in efficiency and power. This experimental study has confirmed the importance of inter-ring crevice on UHC emission in an SI engine and established a relationship between the inter-ring mixture and UHC emission.
Technical Paper

The Adoption of SAE Aviation Piston Engine Oil Standards for Military Use

1999-04-20
1999-01-1566
This paper describes the final chapter of the military specifications for aviation piston engine lubricants. The adoption and evolution of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Standards J1966 and J1899 from their initial development in 1991 to the present is reviewed. It includes the fine-tuning and revisions of the technical requirements derived from experience gained in qualification programs conducted. Also included are notes regarding the overall commercial oil qualification process and the remaining role of the U.S. Navy for military use approvals
Technical Paper

Newton II Aircraft Powerplant Test Cell Mount

1999-04-20
1999-01-1580
The study of piston aircraft engines with the propeller mounted as the load has been restricted due to the equipment needed to measure the combination of instant engine torque and vibrational movements. This work details the development of an engine mount that has a torque sensitivity of less than 0.05 pound-feet for measuring horsepower, vibration forces, and torque. The hydraulic force measurement system used in the project is discussed and evaluated with the limitations encounter. A torque balance system that can be checked with primary weights for absolute accuracy was developed and described as well as the methods for determining instant vibrational forces and rotational stresses.
Technical Paper

Heavy Duty Testing Cycles Development: A New Methodology

2000-06-19
2000-01-1860
Testing cycles for heavy-duty vehicles are an important topic for authorities, manufacturers, fleet owners, etc. in order to assess exhaust gas emissions and fuel consumption. A new methodology was developed to derive representative testing cycles from velocity versus time driving information. During the development, the work was focussed on city-buses, but the methodology can be applied to heavy-duty vehicles in general. The testing cycles are ‘distance-based’, meaning they impose goal speeds at each location. This implies that during acceleration phases, the accelerator-pedal - and gear lever in case of manual transmission - can be operated in a realistic way. The techniques for deriving this kind of testing cycle are proposed. Results of on-board emission and fuel consumption measurements employing these testing cycles are presented for two 19 tons, 160kW city buses, equipped with respectively a diesel and a CNG (stoechiometric) engine, and a 10 tons 112 kW diesel delivery truck.
Technical Paper

Tailpipe Emissions Comparison Between Propane and Natural Gas Forklifts

2000-06-19
2000-01-1865
It is commonly stated that natural gas-fueled forklifts produce less emissions than propane-fueled forklifts. However, there is relatively little proof. This paper reports on a detailed comparative study at one plant in Edmonton, Canada where a fleet of forklift trucks is used for indoor material movement. (For convenience, the acronym NGV, ie. Natural Gas Vehicle is used to designate natural gas-fueled and LPG, ie. Liquified Petroleum Gas, is used to designate propane-fueled forklifts). Until recently the forklift trucks (of various ages) were LPG carburetted units with two-way catalytic converters. Prompted partially by worker health concerns, the forklifts were converted to fuel injected, closed-loop controlled NGV systems with three-way catalytic converters. The NGV-converted forklifts reduced emissions by 77% (NOX) and 76% (CO) when compared to just-tuned LPG forklifts.
Technical Paper

Potential of a Natural Gas Vehicle as EEV

2000-06-19
2000-01-1863
The natural gas vehicle has high potential as an Environmentally Enhanced Vehicle (EEV). In order to achieve low-emissions, a precise gaseous injection system coupled with optimized feedback control is necessary for the natural gas engines. An advanced natural gas vehicle, such as the Honda Civic GX, can meet the Super-Ultra-Low-Emission Vehicle (SULEV) emission standard in California and also meet the future European & Japanese emission standards. The low-emission natural gas vehicle emits very low off-cycle emissions, air toxic emissions and has zero-fuel evaporative emissions. The use of natural gas-based fuels achieves CO2 emission reductions relative to use of petroleum-based fuels. Low-emission NGVs are attractive for use in urban and metropolitan city centers to reduce smog.
Technical Paper

The Systematic Evaluation of Twelve LP Gas Fuels for Emissions and Fuel Consumption

2000-06-19
2000-01-1867
The effects on bi-fuel car exhaust emissions, fuel consumption and acceleration performance of a range of LPG fuels has been determined. The LPGs tested included those representing natural gas condensate and oil refineries' products to include a spectrum of C3:C4 and paraffiinic:olefinic mixtures. The overall conclusions are that exhaust emissions from the gaseous fuels for the three-way catalyst equipped cars tested were lower than for gasoline. For all the LPGs, CO2 equivalent emissions are reduced by 7% to 10% or more compared with gasoline. The cars' acceleration performance indicates that there was no sacrifice in acceleration times to various speeds, with any gaseous fuel in these OEM developed cars.
Technical Paper

Improvement of Performance and Exhaust Emissions in a Converted Dual-Fuel Natural Gas Engine

2000-06-19
2000-01-1866
To improve performance and exhaust emissions of a converted dual-fuel natural-gas engine, the effects of basic parameters were experimentally investigated. The results show that diesel fuel operation is favorable at very low loads and that a small amount of pilot fuel with a moderate injection rate is effective for suppressing knock at high loads. As for the charge air throttling, there is an optimal combination of charge amount and equivalence ratio to obtain high thermal efficiency and reduced emissions. An optimal strategy for fueling is demonstrated based on the results. Adequate control of pilot fuel amount, injection timing and throttle opening area gives diesel-equivalent thermal efficiency with very low smoke emission over a wide range of loads.
Technical Paper

Direct Injection Compressed Natural Gas Combustion and Visualisation

2000-06-19
2000-01-1838
This paper details the development of a compressed natural gas (CNG) engine with ultra lean burn low emissions potential. Hydrogen assisted jet ignition (HAJI) is used to achieve reliable combustion and low NOx emissions, whilst direct injection is used to improve thermal efficiency and decrease hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. It is found that port inducted propane, port inducted CNG and directly injected CNG all produce negligible levels of CO and NOx when operating at air/fuel ratios higher than λ = 1.8. Furthermore, direct injection of CNG produced approximately 100 ppm C6 less HC emissions than port induction of CNG, and port induction of CNG decreased the HC emissions by around a factor of a third to a half in comparison with port induction of propane.
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