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Magazine

Autonomous Vehicle Engineering: March 2018

2018-03-08
Editorial Autonomy's data binge is more like a 5-course meal. Big Data, Big Challenges Cloud services and multiple partnerships are issues the mobility industry grapples with as data implications expand outside the vehicle. Reinventing the Automobile's Design The convergence of electric propulsion, Level 5 autonomy, and the advent of car-free urban zones, is driving new approaches to vehicle design and engineering. When Steering Isn't Steering Anymore High-level autonomy requires new thinking for even basic vehicle controls. Steer-by-wire technology eases some of the complexities automated driving presents-and offers desirable new possibilities. Autonomy and Electrification: A Perfect Match? Combining SAE Level 4/5 functionality and EV platforms brings chal-lenges-and opportunities for cost reduction and systems optimization. Who's Ahead in the Automated-Driving Race? The 2018 Navigant Research Leaderboard study brings interesting insights on the industry's progress.
Software

Global Mobility Database

1999-05-01
Thank you for your interest in the Global Mobility Database. This demo provides a representative sample of SAE¿s collection of mobility data. It demonstrates the search engine features and functions and includes a data set of more than 900 document summaries with bibliographic information, including abstracts. This subset contains examples of references for technical papers, standards, journal and magazine articles, specifications, regulations, and research reports, and represents all areas of mobility engineering for land, sea, air, and space. You will be asked to login to the SAE Website before accessing the demo. This will require you to register as a new user if you do not already have an SAE Website account. Click on the following link to access the demo: If you have any questions, e-mail CustomerSales@sae.org or call 1-724-772-4086. You may also be interested in: Publications and Standards Database
Standard

Counterfeit and Substandard Battery Risk Mitigation

2018-07-24
WIP
AS7492
The Counterfeit and Substandard Battery Risk Mitigation sub-committee, G21B, is proposed with the goal of addressing the significant risk presented by counterfeit and substandard batteries. A standard similar to the SAE AS6171 Anti-counterfeit standard will provide inspection methods and risk mitigation strategies, to help mitigate the risk for the Aerospace and Defense industries, to the benefit of all.
Standard

Verification Methods for MIL-STD-1760 Stores

2017-08-09
WIP
AS42702
This document establishes techniques for verifying that a Mission Store Interface (MSI) complies with the interface requirements delineated in MIL-STD-1760 Revision E.
Standard

Cables, Fiber Optic, Aerospace, General Specification For

2018-04-04
WIP
AS8041
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the testing methods for all aerospace optic cables. The application of the test methods are defined in the slant sheets. Technical, dimensional, mechanical and operating performance requirements for the associated aerospace fiber optic cables are detailed in the applicable specification slant sheet. In the event of conflict between this standard and the slant sheet, the slant sheet shall take precedence.
Standard

Techniques for Suspect/Counterfeit EEE Parts Detection by Netlist Assurance Test Methods

2016-02-15
WIP
AS6171/16
Netlist Assurance Test Methods exist to assess microcircuit designs for maliciously added, removed, or modified functions detrimental to system operation. In the context of the Microcircuit fabrication design process, these methods will be used to analyze a computer aided design (CAD) representation of the microcircuit. The Netlist Assurance Test Methods discover vulnerabilities, undisclosed functions (e.g. "kill switch", paths to leak passwords, or triggers of malicious activity) and changes from the original specifications of the devices. These methods are intended to be used with standard verification methods that the implemented design has remained unchanged through the many transformations in the design flow.
Standard

Techniques for Suspect/Counterfeit EEE Parts Detection by Thermomechanical Analysis (TMA) Test Methods

2016-12-09
WIP
AS6171/18
This test method provides the capabilities, limitations, and suggested possible applications of TMA as it pertains to detection of suspect/counterfeit EEE parts. Additionally, this document outlines requirements associated with the application of TMA including: equipment requirements, test sample requirements, methodology, control and calibration, data analysis, reporting, and qualification and certification.
Standard

Technique for Suspect/Counterfeit EEE Parts Detection by Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) Test Methods

2015-12-17
WIP
AS6171/17
This document defines capabilities and limitations of LSM and CLSM as they pertain to suspect/counterfeit EEE part detection. Additionally, this document outlines requirements associated with the application of LSM and CLSM including: operator training, sample preparation, various imaging techniques, data interpretation, calibration, and reporting of test results. This test method is primarily directed to analyses performed in the visible to near infrared range (approximately 400nm to 1100nm). The Test Laboratory shall be accredited to ISO/IEC 17025 to perform the LSM and CLSM Test Methods as defined in this standard. The Test Laboratory shall indicate in the ISO/IEC 17025 Scope statement, the specific method being accredited to: Option 1: All AS6171/17 Test Methods, or Option 2: All AS6171/17 Test Methods except CLSM. If SAE AS6171/17 is invoked in the contract, the base document, AS6171 General Requirements shall also apply.
Standard

Techniques for Suspect/Counterfeit EEE Parts Detection by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) Test Method

2016-12-09
WIP
AS6171/19
This document defines capabilities and limitations of Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) as it pertains to detection of suspect/counterfeit EEE parts and suggests possible applications to these ends. Additionally, this document outlines requirements associated with the application of AES including: operator training and requirements; sample preparation; data interpretation and reporting of data.
Standard

Techniques for Suspect/Counterfeit EEE Parts Detection by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) Test Methods

2016-12-09
WIP
AS6171/21
This document defines capabilities and limitations of Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) as it pertains to detection of suspect/counterfeit EEE parts and suggests possible applications to these ends. Additionally, this document outlines requirements associated with the application of GC/MS including: operator training; sample preparation; various sampling techniques; data interpretation; computerized spectral matching; equipment maintenance; and reporting of data. The discussion is limited to unit mass resolution spectrometers such as quadrupole systems and electron impact ionization.
Standard

Techniques for Suspect/Counterfeit EEE Parts Detection by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Test Method

2016-12-09
WIP
AS6171/20
To define capabilities and limitations of X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) as it pertains to detection of suspect/counterfeit EEE parts and suggest possible applications to these ends. Additionally, this document outlines requirements associated with the application of XPS including: operator training and requirements; sample preparation; data interpretation; and data reporting procedures.
Standard

TECHNIQUES FOR SUSPECT/COUNTERFEIT EEE PARTS DETECTION BY RADIATED ELECTROMAGNETIC EMISSION (REME) ANALYSIS TEST METHODS

2016-05-16
WIP
AS6171/14
The intent of this document is to define the methodology for suspect/counterfeit parts inspection using REME Analysis. The purpose of REME Analysis for suspect counterfeit part inspection is to detect misrepresentation or tampering of a part. REME Analysis can also potentially detect unintentional damage to the part resulting from improper removal of the part from assemblies, exposure to electrostatic discharge, exposure to radiation outside of acceptable limits (ionizing or high-power electromagnetic), or degradation. Improper removal of part from assemblies may include, but is not limited to, prolonged elevated temperature exposure during desoldering operations or mechanical stresses during removal. Degradation may include, but is not limited to, prolonged burn-in/testing, exposure to out-of-specification environmental conditions, or use outside of expected electrical tolerances.
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