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Video

Achieving a Lightweight and Steel-Intensive Body Structure for Alternative Powertrains

2012-02-14
FutureSteelVehicle's (FSV) objective is to develop detailed design concepts for a radically different steel body structure for a compact Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV). It also will identify structure changes to accommodate larger Plug-In Hybrid (PHEV) and Fuel Cell (FCEV) vehicle variants. The presentation will demonstrate seven optimized structural sub-systems that contribute to the program's 35 percent mass reduction goals and meet its safety and life cycle emissions targets. It will explain the advanced design optimization process used and the resulting aggressive steel concepts. Presenter Jody R. Shaw, US Steel
Video

Lightweight Door Panel Made with Bio-Based Composite Material

2012-05-23
This paper presents a new concept for a 100% plastic prototype automotive door panel. This concept has the potential of providing a weight reduction of up to 40% compared to conventional steel door panels, but with equivalent performance (static strength). This innovative technology can be used for a variety of exterior automotive parts. The concept includes a composite sandwich panel combination of GFRP (glass fiber reinforced polymer), and LACTIF®, which is expanded beads foam made from PLA (polylactic acid) and developed by JSP Corporation. This GFRP+LACTIF® composite design offers the following characteristics: Excellent environmental resistance Strong adhesion Equivalent static strength (vs. conventional door panels) Design flexibility This concept also offers an alternative to conventional steel door panel systems by using unsaturated polyester material of plant origin as part of the GFRP composite.
Video

Supplier Discussions - 2012

2012-03-29
Seven different suppliers will discuss their latest technologies. Panelist Jon Bereisa, Auto Lectrification LLC John Burgers, Dana Canada Corporation Derek De Bono, Valeo Dusan Graovac, Infineon Technologies AG Ronald P. Krupitzer, American Iron and Steel Institute Timothy J. Lawler, Bosch Corp. Ian M. Sharp, Flybrid Systems LLP
Video

Monitoring the Progression of Micro-Pitting in Spur Geared Transmission Systems Using Online Health Monitoring Techniques

2012-03-16
Micro-pitting is a fatigue effect that occurs in geared transmission systems due to high contact stress, and monitoring its progression is vital to prevent the eventual failure of the tooth flank. Parameter signature analysis has been successfully used to monitor bending fatigue failure and advanced phases of gear surface fatigue failure such as macro-pitting and scuffing. However, due to modern improvements in steel production the main cause of gear contact fatigue failure can be attributed to surface micro-pitting rather than sub-surface phenomena. Responding to the consequent demand to detect and monitor the progression of micro-pitting, this study experimentally evaluated the development of micro-pitting in spur gears using vibration and oil debris analysis. The paper presents the development of an online health monitoring system for use with back-to-back gear test rigs.
Technical Paper

Resabtors - Advanced Multi-Material Muffler Designs for Clean Air Applications

2020-09-30
2020-01-1554
The development and production of resonators on the charged air side of combustion engines require profound base of knowledge in designing, simulating and the production of such parts in different materials (aluminum, copper, stainless steel and technical plastic). As combustion engines are under constant discussion, this existing knowledge base should be used for other applications within and outside the automotive industry. Very quickly it became apparent that new challenges often require completely new solutions, designs and materials to meet the requirements of flow noise reducing parts. For example, for clean air applications mufflers based on “special treated foams” and “meta-materials” can be introduced. These materials offer new potentials for tuning of the frequency range and allow improved broad banded flow noise attenuation. Such parts are named “Resabtors” in order to take respect of the different flow noise attenuation principles resonation and absorbing.
Training / Education

Metallurgy of Steel: Principles

Anytime
This online course teaches the phases and microstructures that form in steels, their effects on steel properties, the microstructure changes that occur when steel is heated and cooled, the effects of carbon content and cooling rate on the microstructures that form. Also, how to read the iron-carbon phase diagram will be discussed. All this information is applicable to understanding the effects of steel heat treating processes and heat treating process parameters on the microstructure and properties of heat treated plain carbon, low-alloy, and tools steels. The course is divided into six modules followed by a quiz.
Training / Education

Metallurgy of Steel Case Hardening

Anytime
This online course discusses common steel case hardening processes and how they are used to modify the surface layers of steels to obtain specific mechanical properties. Participants will learn about the process parameters and how they affect case composition, depth, microstructure, and properties. The course takes one hour to complete.
Training / Education

Metallurgy of Steel Through Hardening

Anytime
This online course teaches about the metallurgy of the following steel through hardening processes: quench and temper, martempering, and austempering. Participants will learn about the effects of heat treating temperature and cooling rate on steel microstructure and properties, and the effects of the interaction between heat treating process parameters and steel composition on through hardened steel microstructure and strength. This course takes one hour to complete.
Technical Paper

Duralumin All-Metal Airplane Construction

1928-01-01
280030
PSYCHOLOGY of the public, as well as engineering structure and aerodynamics, is involved in commercial aviation. The public has confidence in metal. With quantity production in view, the author and his associates considered costs of production as related to quantity and also costs of maintenance at airports and in the field, and chose metal as the material of construction. Structural members are fashioned from sheet duralumin rather than from tubes and a type of construction was evolved that can be made with the minimum investment in tools, that is cheap to put together and that can be repaired with the smallest amount of equipment and labor. For compression loads, duralumin has a great deal more strength for a given weight than has steel. It cannot be used, however, for compression members in combination with steel in tension members because of the difference in coefficient of expansion.
Technical Paper

Data on Machinability and Wear of Cast Iron

1928-01-01
280022
THE hardness or chemical composition of an iron is, by itself, no indication of the wearing property and machinability of the iron. Irons containing a large amount of free ferrite have been found to wear rapidly, whereas others having considerable pearlite or sorbite in their structure show good wearing properties. The presence in cylinder-blocks of excess-carbide spots or of phosphides of high phosphorus-content is deleterious, because such spots wear in relief and the material ultimately breaks out, acting as an abrasive that scores the surfaces. Causes of wear in cylinder-blocks are discussed, and nickel, or nickel and chromium, intelligently added to the iron is suggested as a means of obtaining the correct microstructure for a combination of good wearing properties and machinability.
Technical Paper

The Automatic Fabrication of Automobile Frames

1928-01-01
280021
NEARLY all steel used in this process of manufacturing frames comes to the plant in the form of strips, which are rolled to remove curvature and inspected automatically for dimensions. All operations and handling are automatic, except pickling, cleaning and oiling the stock and inspecting the assembled frame, until the enameled frame is ready to be shipped. Economical use of the strip steel is dependent upon an offsetting operation that makes the strip conform to the vertical curves desired in the finished frame. With the aid of illustrations, the author follows the fabricating process through the various lines and other units, until a frame is ready for shipment or storage, within less than 2 hr. after it enters the manufacturing line as strip steel.
Technical Paper

Correlating Test-Data on Heat-Treated Chromium-Vanadium Steels

1928-01-01
280023
AN outline is given of the work performed and the method of procedure followed in correlating test results on specimens of heat-treated S.A.E. chromium-vanadium steel 6130 as a basis for revision of the physical-property charts for certain automotive steels. Revision of the charts was proposed by the Iron and Steel Division of the Standards Committee of the Society, and a subcommittee, of which the author is a member, was appointed to carry on the preliminary work of revision. The paper is a report of the results of the tests made. Test specimens of S.A.E. Steel 6130, to be drawn at three different temperatures after quenching, were prepared by four steel manufacturers. These were distributed among 30 cooperating laboratories, which made a series of about 115 tests including complete chemical analysis, tensile-strength, and Brinell, scleroscope and Rockwell hardness tests on the specimens.
Technical Paper

Progress in Honing-Machines and the Honing Process

1928-01-01
280060
CYLINDER finishing by rough and finish-boring with wide tools, which was thought good enough during the first dozen years of the automobile-production period, was supplanted by reaming and grinding. Later, cast-iron and copper laps were used, but all these methods were slow and did not produce the fine finish for which a demand developed. Experiments were begun about 1920 with the process known as honing. Five years later the company with which the author is connected converted one of its drilling-machines into a single-spindle honing-machine. Other companies made similar conversions. The first honing-head was introduced in 1923. Not until three years ago, however, did honing begin to be regarded as a real production-method possibility. Since then, very rapid progress has been made and numerous improved machines, honing-heads and honing-stones have been produced.
Technical Paper

Alloy Steels and Their Application in the Automotive Industry

1928-01-01
280058
AFTER outlining the progress of research in the development of the alloy steels, the author says that alloys of steel containing nickel, chromium, and nickel and chromium, are the most important to the automotive industry, which is especially interested in alloys containing up to 5.0 per cent of nickel and up to approximately 1.5 per cent of chromium, with the carbon content ranging from 0.10 to 0.50 per cent. The additions of these amounts do not materially change the nature of the metallographic constituents, but the elements exert their influence on the physical properties largely by altering the rate of the structural changes. In straight carbon-steel, especially of large sections, it is not possible by quenching to retard the austenite transformation sufficiently to produce as good physical properties as are desired.
Technical Paper

The Packard X 24-Cylinder 1500-Hp. Water-Cooled Aircraft Engine

1928-01-01
280064
AFTER outlining the history of development of the Packard X engine, the author states the legitimate position in aviation deserved by the water-cooled aviation-engine of this type and predicts large increases in the size, speed and carrying capacity of airplanes within the near future. Passing then to a discussion of the important features of the X-type engine, various illustrations of its parts are commented upon. The cylinders are built-up from steel forgings, with all welds arranged so as to be subjected to no excessive alternating stresses. The novel features of this cylinder design lie in the fact that the valve seats are entirely surrounded by water and that water space is provided above the combustion-chamber and below the top plate of the cylinder. The cylinder-head is extremely rigid, resisting deflection and assuring the maximum integrity of valve seats. The valve ports are machined integrally with the cylinder-head and are not welded thereto as in the Liberty engine.
Technical Paper

Modern Naval Aircraft

1927-01-01
270072
MORE and more is being demanded of Navy airplanes beyond the requirements of commercial planes. Catapulting and deck landings are required of some planes and corrosion must be guarded against. Bombers and fighting planes each have their special requirements, and planes must be able to land safely on either land or water. The most important developments in aerodynamics now going on are to restrict the travel of the center of pressure of the wings as the angle of attack changes; but widespread adoption of slotted wings and other results of experimental development may be expected. Metal is being used more than formerly in structural work but there are as yet no all-metal service-types in the Navy. Chrome-molybdenum steel is replacing mild carbon-steel in the tubular frames of fuselages, and there is a tendency to seek substitutes for welded joints. Duralumin is slowly replacing steel where welding is not required, but its adoption is retarded because of corrosion.
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