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Toyota Technical Review 2010

2010-08-01
Giving unique insight into Toyota's 2010 technical developments, this book includes 19 papers that chronicle the Japanese OEM's R&D activities in a variety of technologies during that year. This volume takes a special look at the Prius, Toyota's popular hybrid, along with other technical innovations. Title highlights include: Prius Technology • Hybrid Technologies in the 3rd Generation Prius • Chassis Development for the 3rd Generation Prius • Design of the Prius as an Eco-Icon Other Technical Areas • Introduction of the World's First Rear Seat Occupant Restraint System for Rear-End Collisions • Development of Fuel Consumption Estimation Technology Using VHDL-AMS • Development of Electrode Structure for High Performance Fuel Cell Using CAE
Technical Paper

Performance and Exhaust Emission in Spark Ignition Engine Fueled with Methanol-Butane Mixture

1988-03-01
871165
To improve the cold startability of methanol, methanol-butane mixed fuel was experimented. Engine performance and exhaust emissions are obtained with methanol-butane mixed fuel. These characteristics are compared with those of methanol and gasoline. The mixing ratios of methanol and butane are 50:50 (M50), 80:20 (M80), and 90:10 (M90) based on the calorific value. As a result, M90 produces more power than gasoline and more or less than methanol depending on the engine speed and the excess air ratio. Brake horse power of M90 is higher than that of gasoline by 5 - 10 %, and brake specific fuel consumption is smaller than that of gasoline by 17 % to the maximum based on the calorific value. NOx emission concentrations for M90 are lower than those for gasoline and higher than those for methanol because of the effect of butane, CO emission concentrations are somewhat lower than those for methanol and gasoline.
Technical Paper

“Passenger Vehicle Petrol Consumption - Measurement in the Real World”

1988-03-01
871159
A survey of the in-service fuel consumption of passenger vehicles and derivatives in the Australian fleet was carried out in 1984-85. Seven hundred and four owners across Australia took part in the survey. Vehicle owners reported by questionnaire the amount of fuel used during four tank fills of normal operation, the distance travelled, and other details of the operating circumstances. The survey shows a clear downward trend in the fuel consumption of the Australian passenger fleet. The data also provides comparisons of actual fuel consumption obtained on the road, with laboratory derived values for fuel consumption. Vehicles in a sub-set of 40 were fitted with fuel flow meters during the survey and tested to Australian Standard 2077 for fuel consumption. The questionnaire method is shown to be a valid and accurate technique for determining in-service fuel consumption.
Technical Paper

Factors Influencing Petrol Consumption as Determined from a Survey of the Australian Passenger Car Fleet

1988-03-01
871160
A survey of the on-road petrol consumption of Australian passenger cars provided data which has been analysed for effects on fuel consumption caused by features such as transmission type, vehicle inertia class, engine size, air conditioning presence and vehicle location. Results show that cars with automatic transmissions consistently have higher petrol consumption than manuals for all inertia classes - 15% higher in city conditions and 11% higher in highway conditions. There is also a penalty for automatic transmissions at most engine sizes, although the penalty is relatively larger for smaller engine capacities. Presence of air conditioning was found to increase petrol consumption by 13.5% on average, but the data did not allow the impact of frequency of use to be determined. Coastal driving conditions resulted in petrol consumption being 9.4% higher than for inland conditions, and cars driven in winter had 4.4% greater fuel consumption than cars driven in summer.
Technical Paper

Australian Initiatives in Traffic Management and Energy - Vehicle Parameters and Interactions

1988-03-01
871158
This paper reviews the interactions between vehicle and road designers, particularly in the area of fuel consumption related to traffic management. The need for increased interaction between vehicle and road designers is illustrated in the cases of truck traffic performance, truck technology, information technology in cars, car performance, speed control and road information. Fuel consumption models developed at the Australian Road Research Board are described for the purposes of traffic management analysis for intersections, road links and broad urban studies. These models are a major step towards appropriate choice of traffic control systems, but need accurate estimates of vehicle performance characteristics in real traffic.
Technical Paper

A Procedure for Evaluating Cycle Emissions from Raw Exhaust Gas Analyses

1988-03-01
871194
A procedure has been developed for evaluating equivalent drive cycle emission results from raw exhaust gas emissions data obtained from an engine under test on a computer controlled Vehicle Simulator Engine Dynamometer. The emitted species data is integrated with the air intake flow rate to determine the total mass of emissions, after correcting for the reduction in exhaust gas mass due to precipitation of the moisture of combustion. This procedure eliminates the need for the Constant Volume Sample (CVS) System attached to the vehicle exhaust while undergoing simulated drive testing on a chassis dynamometer to evaluate compliance of the test vehicle with the Australian Design Rules, ADR27 and ADR37. Sources of error with the procedure are examined by comparing the fuel consumption measured using a volumetric technique during the test with that evaluated by a carbon balance procedure as given in the Australian Design Rules.
Technical Paper

Effect of High Squish Combustion Chamber on Simultaneous Reduction of NOx and Particulate from a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine

1999-05-03
1999-01-1502
In this study it is tried to reduce NOx and particulate emissions simultaneously in a direct injection diesel engine based on the concept of two-stage combustion. At initial combustion stage, NOx emission is reduced with fuel rich combustion. At diffusion combustion stage, particulate emission is reduced with high turbulence combustion. The high squish combustion chamber with reduced throat diameter is used to realize two-stage combustion. This combustion chamber is designed to produce strong squish that causes high turbulence. When throat diameter of the high squish combustion chamber is reduced to some extent, simultaneous reduction of NOx and particulate emissions is achieved with less deterioration of fuel consumption at retarded injection timing. Further reduction of NOx emission is realized by reducing the cavity volume of the high squish combustion chamber. Analysis by endoscopic high speed photography and CFD calculation describes the experimental results.
Technical Paper

A Six-Stroke DI Diesel Engine Under Dual Fuel Operation

1999-05-03
1999-01-1500
A six-stroke DI diesel engine proposed by the authors had second compression and combustion processes which were added on a conventional four-stroke diesel engine. This engine had the first and second power strokes before the exhaust stroke. Numerical predictions and experiments previously carried out had shown that this six-stroke diesel engine could reduce NO exhaust emission. Further, the ignition delay of the second combustion process could be shortened by a high temperature effect in the second compression stroke. This advantage of short ignition delay could be utilized for an ignition improvement of a fuel with low cetane number. In the engine system reported here, a conventional diesel fuel was supplied as the fuel of first combustion process, and in the second combustion process, methanol was supplied.
Technical Paper

Effects of a Hybrid Fuel System with Diesel and Premixed DME/Methane Charge on Exhaust Emissions in a Small DI Diesel Engine

1999-05-03
1999-01-1509
Early stage combustion systems, with lean homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), have been studied, with the intent to decrease the pollutant emission characteristics of DI diesel engines. Early stage combustion enables drastic reductions in both nitrogen oxides (NOx) and smoke emission, but the operating load range is restricted, due to combustion phenomena, such as unsteady combustion and knocking. In this study, we explored the possibility of broadening the operating load range in HCCI and reducing pollutant emissions using Dimethyl Ether (DME) fumigated through the intake pipe. However, the improvements in load range were found to be less than 0.1 MPa in brake mean effective pressure (BMEP), even when compression ratios were reduced and Methane with high octane number was mixed. Therefore, a DME premixed charge could be used only at light loads. At heavier loads a hybrid fuel system with a DME premixed charge and diesel fuel injection is necessary.
Technical Paper

Heavy Duty Testing Cycles Development: A New Methodology

2000-06-19
2000-01-1860
Testing cycles for heavy-duty vehicles are an important topic for authorities, manufacturers, fleet owners, etc. in order to assess exhaust gas emissions and fuel consumption. A new methodology was developed to derive representative testing cycles from velocity versus time driving information. During the development, the work was focussed on city-buses, but the methodology can be applied to heavy-duty vehicles in general. The testing cycles are ‘distance-based’, meaning they impose goal speeds at each location. This implies that during acceleration phases, the accelerator-pedal - and gear lever in case of manual transmission - can be operated in a realistic way. The techniques for deriving this kind of testing cycle are proposed. Results of on-board emission and fuel consumption measurements employing these testing cycles are presented for two 19 tons, 160kW city buses, equipped with respectively a diesel and a CNG (stoechiometric) engine, and a 10 tons 112 kW diesel delivery truck.
Technical Paper

The Systematic Evaluation of Twelve LP Gas Fuels for Emissions and Fuel Consumption

2000-06-19
2000-01-1867
The effects on bi-fuel car exhaust emissions, fuel consumption and acceleration performance of a range of LPG fuels has been determined. The LPGs tested included those representing natural gas condensate and oil refineries' products to include a spectrum of C3:C4 and paraffiinic:olefinic mixtures. The overall conclusions are that exhaust emissions from the gaseous fuels for the three-way catalyst equipped cars tested were lower than for gasoline. For all the LPGs, CO2 equivalent emissions are reduced by 7% to 10% or more compared with gasoline. The cars' acceleration performance indicates that there was no sacrifice in acceleration times to various speeds, with any gaseous fuel in these OEM developed cars.
Technical Paper

Performance and Emission Analysis of a Non-Conventional Gasoline Engine

2000-06-19
2000-01-1840
A new engine design concept, characterized by a single cylinder-double piston and a cycloid crank rotor instead of the conventional crankshaft has been developed recently by Gul & Co Development AB, Sweden. The rotor (crank disc) is equipped with an oval groove in the shape of a sinusoidal cycloid according to the expression varies from 0 to 1. Inside the oval groove a ball rolls/slides in order to transfer force from the piston to the rotor. Such a rotor contains groove surfaces for the valve movement control as well. Each turn of the rotor corresponds to four strokes for both the pistons. Thus, a full 4-stroke engine cycle is developed for a single non-conventional crankshaft revolution. Having the extra freedom to select an optimal piston movement, the new design is believed to have the potential to provide low emissions, low noise levels and lower fuel consumption. Therefore, it has been subjected to an engine thermodynamics simulation, to provide an insight to engine performance.
Technical Paper

Performance Development of the First European Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Equipped with Full Electronic High Injection Pressure Common Rail System

2000-06-19
2000-01-1821
Over the last few years, Renault VI has gained an important knowledge in low emissions combustion optimization using the high injection pressure Common Rail system. A completely new six cylinder in-line DCI 11 engine has been designed with this full electronic injection system for EURO3 truck applications. The engine performance has been optimized to reach low fuel consumption and low emissions, while keeping customer utilization in mind. After a short view on the general features of the new engine, the highly flexible injection system is presented as well as its potential to control fuel injection timing, fuel quantity and pressure with multiple injections, independently of engine speed and load. The development process is described, covering the swirl design with two inlet ports per cylinder, the injector and combustion bowl geometry match and the injection data optimization.
Technical Paper

Numerical Investigation of Vehicles Aerodynamics through Driving Tunnels

2000-04-02
2000-01-1579
Due to the rapid development in many parts of Egypt, construction of a wide road network is maintaining a rapid pace. But, those roads are affected by the overcrowded big cities. Thus, there is a growing need for driving tunnels to reduce the traffic problems and facilitate transportation. This issue is highly related to economic (fuel consumption) and environmental (pollution and noise) matters. Up to our knowledge, this paper represents the first numerical study to concern driving tunnels in the Middle East. Actual domestic tunnels and vehicles are computationally simulated. Investigations concentrate on flow behavior, especially overall drag coefficient and wake structure behind vehicles. Results show that many parameters, such as tunnel height, and vehicle height and speed, affect the aerodynamic characteristics through driving tunnels.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of an Unconventional Diesel Engine as a General Aviation Powerplant

2000-05-09
2000-01-1685
A novel two stroke cycle diesel engine is evaluated as a general aviation aircraft powerplant. Two certificated spark-ignited gasoline reciprocating engines are also evaluated in the same aircraft. The evaluation of aircraft propulsion performance considered only the effects of altered powerplant parameters on the range of an aircraft having a fixed gross weight and payload cruising at a given lift/drag ratio. Thermodynamic analysis finds the diesel engine can have a sea level power rating exceeding the 10,000 foot cruise power requirement by 55% with nearly equal specific fuel consumption, a low engine speed and a modest cylinder pressure. It uses a single-stage, radial turbocharger without intercooling or auxiliary mechanical scavenging. The diesel engine can significantly increase the range of a particular airplane now powered by a certificated turboprop engine. The candidate gasoline engines could not equal the turboprop-powered aircraft performance.
Technical Paper

Ovonic Power and Energy Storage Technologies For the Next Generation of Vehicles

2000-04-02
2000-01-1590
The next generation of vehicles will see many new concepts involving propulsion technologies currently being developed by many of the worlds automakers and suppliers. These concepts will include pure electric vehicles (EV), hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) with advanced internal combustion engines and fuel cell hybrid electric vehicles (FCHEV). These new vehicle concepts all need a high-efficiency electrical energy storage system (EESS). This paper describes the basic requirements for the next-generation vehicle technologies and emphasizes the performance of Ovonic technologies as it relates to vehicle requirements. Ovonic Battery Company (OBC) is developing and commercializing enabling technologies for the energy storage for advanced vehicles. Ovonic technologies enable the performance of advanced vehicles to exceed that of today's conventional vehicles while providing additional benefits of clean-air transportation and greatly reduced fuel consumption.
Technical Paper

New Quiescent Combustion System for Heavy–Duty Diesel Engines to Overcome Exhaust Emissions and Fuel Consumption Trade–Off

2000-06-19
2000-01-1811
In the next few years, the USA, EU, and Japan plan to introduce very stringent exhaust emissions regulations for heavy–duty diesel engines, in order to enhance the protection air quality. This builds upon the heavy–duty diesel engine exhaust emissions regulations already in effect. At the same time, improvement in fuel consumption of heavy–duty diesel engines will be very important for lowering vehicle operating costs, conserving fossil fuel resources, and reduction of CO2 (greenhouse gas) levels. This paper presents a detailed review of a quiescent combustion system for a heavy–duty diesel engine, which offers breakthrough performance in terms of the exhaust emissions – fuel consumption trade–off, compared with the more conventional swirl supported combustion system. This conclusion is supported by experimental results comparing quiescent and swirl supported versions of various combustion system configurations.
Technical Paper

The Influence of EGR on Heat Release Rate and NO Formation in a DI Diesel Engine

2000-06-19
2000-01-1807
Exhaust Gas Recirculation, EGR, is one of the most effective means of reducing NOx emissions from diesel engines and is likely to be used in order to meet future emissions standards. Exhaust gases can either be used to replace some of the air that enters the engine or can be added to the intake flow. The former case has been studied in this paper. One advantage of air replacement is that the exhaust mass flow is reduced in addition to the decreased NOx formation. The objective of this study has been to take a closer look at the factors affecting NOx emissions at different EGR rates. This is done by combining heat release analysis, based on measured pressure traces and NO formation in a multi zone combustion model. The model used is an improved version of an earlier presented model [1]. One feature in the new model is the possibility to separate the NO formation during the premixed combustion from NO formed during the diffusive combustion.
Technical Paper

Characterisation of the Injection-Combustion Process in a Common Rail D.I. Diesel Engine Running with Sasol Fischer-Tropsch Fuel

2000-06-19
2000-01-1803
Regulatory standards on diesel engines emissions will decidedly become more restrictive in coming years. This has led to the development and implementation of alternative fuels. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential of Sasol Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel to improve the reduction of emissions in a direct injection diesel engine with a high pressure common-rail injection system (HDI engine from PSA Peugeot-Citroën). In principle, FT diesel fuel shows significant advantages in reducing emissions over a standard diesel fuel due to its low aromaticity, high cetane rating and high H/C rating. Initial tests with two 406 HDI Euro 2 vehicles with standard calibration showed very favourable trends on exhaust emissions in comparaison with reference fuel (CEC RF73-A-93 type). Sasol FT diesel fuel gave significant improvement on specific fuel consumption, and decreased the HC, CO, CO2 and particulate emissions without degrading NOx emissions.
Technical Paper

Stratified Scavenging Applied to a Small Capacity Two-Stroke Scooter for the Reduction of Fuel Consumption and Emissions

1999-09-28
1999-01-3271
The advantages of high power to density ratio and low manufacturing costs of a two-stroke engine compared to a four-stroke unit make it currently the most widely used engine type for 50cc displacement 2-wheelers. This dominance is threatened by increasingly severe exhaust emissions legislation, forcing manufactures to develop their two-stroke engines to comply with the legislation. This paper describes a simple solution to reduce these harmful emissions in a cost effective manner, for a scooter application. The method of stratified scavenging is achieved by delivering the fuel into the rear transfer passage from a remote mechanical fuel metering device, operated by intake manifold pressure. Air only is delivered into the cylinder from the remaining transfer passages which are directed towards the rear transfer port, thus impeding the fuel from reaching the exhaust during the scavenging process.
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