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Technical Paper

Issues and Trends in Automotive Aluminum Sheet Forming

1993-03-01
930277
Aluminum sheet forming is entering an era where rapid advances in technology are likely. Combining increased understanding of material behavior, increased understanding of metalworking tribology and improved control of sheet forming processes will result in improved distribution of strain, allowing more complex components to be formed and greater design flexibility. New process control techniques will be developed and implemented to result in improved press actions, control of strain path to effect increased formability and reduced sensitivity to process variables. Improved techniques for assessing producibility and for generating effective tool designs will be developed, perhaps eliminating the need for soft tool tryouts to substantially reduce the total die development time and cost. In this review paper, each of these issues will be discussed.
Technical Paper

Development of an Improved Cosmetic Corrosion Test for Finished Aluminum Autobody Panels

2007-04-16
2007-01-0417
Since 2000, an Aluminum Cosmetic Corrosion task group within the SAE Automotive Corrosion and Protection (ACAP) Committee has existed. The task group has pursued the goal of establishing a standard test method for in-laboratory cosmetic corrosion evaluations of finished aluminum auto body panels. A cooperative program uniting OEM, supplier, and consultants has been created and has been supported in part by USAMP (AMD 309) and the U.S. Department of Energy. Prior to this committee's formation, numerous laboratory corrosion test environments have been used to evaluate the performance of painted aluminum closure panels. However, correlations between these laboratory test results and in-service performance have not been established. Thus, the primary objective of this task group's project was to identify an accelerated laboratory test method that correlates well with in-service performance.
Journal Article

Development of an Improved Cosmetic Corrosion Test for Finished Aluminum Autobody Panels

2008-04-14
2008-01-1156
A task group within the SAE Automotive Corrosion and Protection (ACAP) Committee continues to pursue the goal of establishing a standard test method for in-laboratory cosmetic corrosion evaluations of finished aluminum auto body panels. The program is a cooperative effort with OEM, supplier, and consultant participation and is supported in part by USAMP (AMD 309) and the U.S. Department of Energy. Numerous laboratory corrosion test environments have been used to evaluate the performance of painted aluminum closure panels, but correlations between laboratory test results and in-service performance have not been established. The primary objective of this project is to identify an accelerated laboratory test method that correlates with in-service performance. In this paper the type, extent, and chemical nature of cosmetic corrosion observed in the on-vehicle exposures are compared with those from some of the commonly used laboratory tests
Technical Paper

Development of an Improved Cosmetic Corrosion Test for Finished Aluminum Autobody Panels

2005-04-11
2005-01-0542
A co-operative program initiated by the Automotive Aluminum Alliance and supported by USAMP continues to pursue the goal of establishing an in-laboratory cosmetic corrosion test for finished aluminum auto body panels that provides a good correlation with in-service performance. The program is organized as a task group within the SAE Automotive Corrosion and Protection (ACAP) Committee. Initially a large reservoir of test materials was established to provide a well-defined and consistent specimen supply for comparing test results. A series of laboratory procedures have been conducted on triplicate samples at separate labs in order to evaluate the reproducibility of the various lab tests. Exposures at OEM test tracks have also been conducted and results of the proving ground tests have been compared to the results in the laboratory tests. Outdoor tests and on-vehicle tests are also in progress. An optical imaging technique is being utilized for evaluation of the corrosion.
Technical Paper

Development of an Improved Cosmetic Corrosion Test By the Automotive and Aluminum Industries for Finished Aluminum Autobody Panels

2003-03-03
2003-01-1235
The Automotive Aluminum Alliance in conjunction with SAE ACAP founded a corrosion task group in 2000 with a goal to establish an in-laboratory cosmetic corrosion test for finished aluminum auto body panels, which provides a good correlation with in-service performance. Development of this test involves a number of key steps that include: (1) Establishing a reservoir of standard test materials to provide a well-defined and consistent frame of reference for comparing test results; (2) Defining a real-world performance for the reference materials through on-vehicle tests conducted in the U.S. and Canada; (3) Evaluating existing laboratory, proving ground, and outdoor tests; (4) Conducting statistically designed experiments to evaluate the effects of cyclic-test variables; (5) Comparing corrosion mechanisms of laboratory and on-vehicle tests; and (6) Conducting a round robin test program to determine the precision of the new test. Several of these key steps have been accomplished.
Technical Paper

Correlation between Accelerated Laboratory Tests and Field Tests for Filiform Corrosion of Painted Aluminum Alloy Sheets for Automobiles

2003-10-27
2003-01-2749
Correlation between accelerated laboratory tests and field tests for filiform corrosion of painted aluminum alloy sheets for automobile was investigated by conducting six kinds of laboratory tests with different pH, dry-wet condition, etc., and two sites of outdoor exposure tests, and vehicle test. It was found that susceptibility to filiform corrosion in the laboratory tests increased with the decrease of pH and/or the increase of repetition rate of wet/dry cycle. The susceptibility in the laboratory tests also increased with the increase of Cu contents in the alloy or with the sanding treatment before painting. The same tendency was obtained in the outdoor exposure tests and vehicle test. However, the correlation of the outdoor exposure tests and the vehicle test was low. In conclusion, the laboratory tests with relatively low wet ratio (70%) correlated well with the outdoor exposure tests, and the tests with relatively high wet ratio (95%) correlated well the vehicle tests.
Technical Paper

Anisotropy Effects in the Forming of Aluminum Sheet

1995-02-01
950702
In an effort to reduce anisotropy, which affects sheet forming performance, special actions were taken in the production of 6009-T4 sheet. To further reduce anisotropy in forming behavior, the modified 6009-T4 sheet was given an electro-discharge texture (EDT) surface topography to make friction behavior nondirectional. The modified 6009-T4 was compared to standard 6009-T4 in terms of metallurgical characteristics, laboratory test results and field forming results. The modified sheet yielded reduced planar anisotropy and improved formability. EDT completely removed directionality in friction behavior and led to an improvement in performance in the forming trials.
Technical Paper

Advanced Aluminum and Aluminum-Lithium Solutions for Derivative and Next Generation Aerospace Structures

2012-09-10
2012-01-1874
The challenging performance and affordability goals of next generation aircraft have accelerated the demand for advanced structural materials and concepts capable of achieving significant weight and cost (acquisition and operational) reduction. To meet these aggressive weight and structural maintenance reduction targets, future aircraft will require structural solutions that provide increased strength, damage tolerance and corrosion resistance. Alcoa has developed advanced aluminum alloys and third generation aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys with exceptional performance and durability capability. This presentation first introduces the basic properties of the new 2xxx and 7xxx series aerospace aluminum and third generation Al-Li alloys possessing improved strength, fatigue life, crack propagation, fracture toughness, corrosion resistance, and, in the case of Al-Li alloys, reduced density and increased modulus.
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