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Technical Paper

Model-based optimization methods of combined DPF+SCR Systems

2007-09-16
2007-24-0098
The design of integrated exhaust lines that combine particulate and NOx emission control is a multidimensional optimization problem. The present paper demonstrates the use of an exhaust system simulation platform which is composed of well-established multidimensional mathematical models for the transient thermal and chemical phenomena in DOC, DPF and SCR systems as well as connecting pipe heat transfer effects. The analysis is focused on the European Driving Cycle conditions. Illustrative examples on complete driving cycle simulations with and without forced regeneration events are presented for alternative design approaches. The results illustrate the importance of DOC and DPF heat capacity effects and connecting pipe heat losses on the SCR performance. The possibility of combining DPF and SCR functionality on a single wall-flow substrate is studied.
Technical Paper

Experimental Evaluation of the Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reduction Potential of Low Viscosity Lubricants

2009-06-15
2009-01-1803
Reducing fuel consumption and emissions from road transport is a key factor for tackling global warming, promoting energy security and sustaining a clean environment. Several technical measures have been proposed in this aspect amongst which the application of low viscosity engine lubricants. Low viscosity lubricants are considered to be an interesting option for reducing fuel consumption (and CO2 emissions) throughout the fleet in a relatively cost effective way. However limited data are available regarding their actual “real-world” performance with respect to CO2 and other pollutant emissions. This study attempts to address the issue and to provide experimental data regarding the benefit of low viscosity lubricants on fuel consumption and CO2 emissions over both the type-approval and more realistic driving cycles.
Technical Paper

Development of a Template Model and Simulation Approach for Quantifying the Effect of WLTP Introduction on Light Duty Vehicle CO2 Emissions and Fuel Consumption

2015-09-06
2015-24-2391
The paper describes the development of a modelling approach to simulate the effect of the new Worldwide harmonized Light duty Test Procedure (WLTP) on the certified CO2 emissions of light duty vehicles. The European fleet has been divided into a number of segments based on specific vehicle characteristics and technologies. Representative vehicles for each segment were selected. A test protocol has been developed in order to generate the necessary data for the validation of the vehicle simulation models. In order to minimize the sources of uncertainty and the effects of flexibilities, a reference “template model” was developed to be used in the study. Subsequently, vehicle models were developed using AVL Cruise simulation software based on the above mentioned template model. The various components and sub-modules of the models, as well as their input parameters, have been defined with the support of the respective OEMs.
Technical Paper

Control Strategies for Peak Temperature Limitation in DPF Regeneration Supported by Validated Modeling

2007-04-16
2007-01-1127
One of the main challenges in developing cost-effective diesel particulate filters is to guarantee a thermally safe regeneration under all possible conditions on the road. Uncontrolled regenerations occur when the soot reaction rate is so high that the cooling effect of the incoming exhaust gas is insufficient to keep the temperature below the required limit for material integrity. These conditions occur when the engine switches to idle while the filter is already hot enough to initiate soot oxidation, typically following engine operation at high torque and speed or active filter regeneration. The purpose of this work is to investigate engine management techniques to reduce the reaction rate during typical failure mode regenerations. A purely experimental investigation faces many difficulties, especially regarding measurement accuracy, repeatability in filter soot loading, and repeatability in the regeneration protocol.
Technical Paper

Computer Aided Engineering in the Design of Catalytically Assisted Trap Systems

1997-02-24
970472
The design of a diesel particulate trap system to fit a specific vehicular application requires significant expenditure, due to the high degree of interaction between the vehicle operation and trap behavior. The assistance of modeling in the design process is already well established. This paper presents the basic principles of a Computer Aided Engineering methodology aimed to assist the selection of the basic parameters of a Diesel Particulate Trap System by reducing the number of the necessary experimental tests. The computational modules currently supporting the CAE methodology are based on fundamental mathematical models, incorporating a small number of semi-empirical relations derived by experimental data on trap loading and catalytic regeneration, exhaust system heat transfer and trap backpressure effect on fuel consumption.
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