Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 5 of 5
Technical Paper

Mechanism of Turbocharger Coking in Gasoline Engines

2015-09-01
2015-01-2029
Turbocharged downsized gasoline engines have been widely used in the market as one of the measures to improve fuel economy. Coking phenomena in the lubricating circuit of the turbocharger unit is a well-known issue that may affect turbocharger efficiency and durability. Laboratory rig test such as ASTM D6335 (TEOST 33C) has been used to predict this phenomenon as a part of engine oil performance requirements. On the other hand, laboratory tests sometimes have difficulty reproducing the actual mechanism of coking caused by engine oil degradation. Accumulation of insoluble material is one of the important gasoline engine oil degradation modes. The influence of temperature and insoluble concentration were investigated based on actual used engine oils collected in the field.
Journal Article

Investigation of Engine Oil Effect on Abnormal Combustion in Turbocharged Direct Injection - Spark Ignition Engines

2012-09-10
2012-01-1615
Abnormal combustion referred to as Low Speed Pre-Ignition (LSPI) may restrict low speed torque improvements in turbocharged Direct Injection (DI) - Spark Ignition (SI) Engines. Recent investigations have reported that the auto-ignition of an engine oil droplet from the piston crevice in the combustion chamber may cause unexpected and random LSPI. This study shows that engine oil formulations have significant effects on LSPI. We found that the spontaneous ignition temperature of engine oil, as determined using High-Pressure Differential Scanning Calorimetry (HP-DSC) correlates with LSPI frequency in a prototype turbocharged DI-SI engine. Based on these findings, we believe that the oxidation reaction of the oil is very important factor to the LSPI. Our test data, using a prototype engine, shows both preventative and contributory effects of base oil and metal-based engine oil additives.
Journal Article

Introduction of Fuel Economy Engine Oil Performance Target with New SAE Viscosity Grade

2016-04-05
2016-01-0896
Fuel economy improvement has been one of the most important challenges for the automotive industry, and the oil and additive industries. The automotive, oil, and additive industries including related organizations such as SAE, ASTM, and testing laboratories have made significant efforts to develop not only engine oil technologies but also engine oil standards over decades. The API S category and ILSAC engine oil standard are well known and widely used engine oil specifications [1] [2]. The development of an engine oil standard has important roles to ensure the quality of engine oils in the market and encourage industries to improve the engine oil performance periodically. However, the progress of technology advancement can go faster than the revision of engine oil standard. An introduction of new viscosity grades, SAE 0W-16 and 5W-16 is one good example. The 16 grade was added into the SAE J300 standard that defines viscosity grades for engine oils in April 2013 [3].
Technical Paper

Development of a New Valvetrain Wear Test - The Sequence IVB Test

2016-04-05
2016-01-0891
The study described in this paper covers the development of the Sequence IVB low-temperature valvetrain wear test as a replacement test platform for the existing ASTM D6891 Sequence IVA for the new engine oil category, ILSAC GF-6. The Sequence IVB Test uses a Toyota engine with dual overhead camshafts, direct-acting mechanical lifter valvetrain system. The original intent for the new test was to be a direct replacement for the Sequence IVA. Due to inherent differences in valvetrain system design between the Sequence IVA and IVB engines, it was necessary to alter existing test conditions to ensure adequate wear was produced on the valvetrain components to allow discrimination among the different lubricant formulations. A variety of test conditions and wear parameters were evaluated in the test development. Radioactive tracer technique (RATT) was used to determine the wear response of the test platform to various test conditions.
Technical Paper

Development of ILSAC GF-5 0W-20 Fuel Economy Gasoline Engine Oil

2012-09-10
2012-01-1614
We report in this paper our newly developed technology applied to ILSAC GF-5 0W-20 engine oil that offers great fuel economy improvement over GF-4 counterpart, which is a key performance requirement of modern engine oil to reduce CO2 emissions from a vehicle. Our development strategy of the oil consisted of two elements: (1) further friction reduction under mixed and hydrodynamic lubrication conditions considering use of roller rocker arm type valve train system and (2) lowering viscosity at low temperature conditions to improve fuel economy under cold cycles. Use of roller rocker arm type valve train system has been spreading, because of its advantage of reducing mechanical friction. Unlike engine with conventional direct-acting type valve train system, lubrication condition of engine with the roller rocker arm type valve train system has higher contribution of mixed or hydrodynamic lubrication conditions rather than boundary lubrication condition.
X