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Technical Paper

Wissler Simulations of a Liquid Cooled and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

2006-07-17
2006-01-2238
In order to provide effective cooling for astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVAs), a liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) is used to remove heat by a series of tubes through which cooling water is circulated. To better predict the effectiveness of the LCVG and determine possible modifications to improve performance, computer simulations dealing with the interaction of the cooling garment with the human body have been run using the Wissler Human Thermal Model. Simulations have been conducted to predict the heat removal rate for various liquid cooled garment configurations. The current LCVG uses 48 cooling tubes woven into a fabric with cooling water flowing through the tubes. The purpose of the current project is to decrease the overall weight of the LCVG system. In order to achieve this weight reduction, advances in the garment heat removal rates need to be obtained.
Technical Paper

Steps Toward Developing a Multi-layer Green’s Function Code for Ion Beam Transport

2006-07-17
2006-01-2148
Recently, a new Green’s function code (GRNTRN) for simulation of HZE ion beams in the laboratory setting has been developed. Once fully developed and experimentally verified, GRNTRN will be a great asset in assessing radiation exposures in both the laboratory and space settings. The computational model consists of combinations of physical perturbation expansions based on the scales of atomic interaction, multiple elastic scattering, and nuclear reactive processes with use of Neumann-series expansions with non-perturbative corrections. The code contains energy loss with straggling, nuclear attenuation, nuclear fragmentation with energy dispersion and down shifts. Previous reports show that the new code accurately models the transport of ion beams through a single slab of material. Current research efforts are focused on enabling the code to handle multiple layers of material and the present paper reports on progress made towards that end.
Technical Paper

Regenerative Water Recovery System Testing and Model Correlation

1997-07-01
972550
Biological wastewater processing has been under investigation by AlliedSignal Aerospace and NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) for future use in space. Testing at JSC in the Hybrid Regenerative Water Recovery System (HRWRS) in preparation for future closed human testing has been performed. Computer models have been developed to aid in the design of a new four-person immobilized cell bioreactor. The design of the reactor and validation of the computer model is presented. In addition, the total organic carbon (TOC) computer model has been expanded to begin investigation of nitrification. This model is being developed to identify the key parameters of the nitrification process, and to improve the design and operating conditions of nitrifying bioreactors. In addition, the model can be used as a design tool to rapidly predict the effects of changes in operational conditions and reactor design, significantly reducing the number and duration of experiments required.
Technical Paper

Guidelines for CFD Simulations of Ground Vehicle Aerodynamics

2006-10-31
2006-01-3544
The CFD tools in aerodynamic design process have been commonly used in aerospace industry in last three decades. Although there are many CFD software algorithms developed for aerodynamic applications, the nature of a complex, three-dimensional geometry in incompressible highly separated, viscous flow made computational simulation of ground vehicle aerodynamics more difficult than aerospace applications. However, recent developments in computational hardware and software industry enabled many new engineering applications on computational environment. Traditional production process has largely influenced by computational design, analysis, manufacturing and visualization. Different aspects of linking advanced computational tools and aerodynamic vehicle design challenges are discussed in the present work. Key technologies like parallel computation, turbulence modeling and CFD/wind tunnel compatibility issues are presented.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Computational Investigation of Ahmed Body for Ground Vehicle Aerodynamics

2001-11-12
2001-01-2742
External aerodynamics remains one of the major concerns in designing a new generation road vehicle. In the present study, the external aerodynamics of an Ahmed body at a scale and Reynolds number, that are representative of a car or light truck at highway speeds, is explored. An experimental model test was compared with a computational model using various back angles. In addition, the experiment allowed lift and drag to be measured at yaw angles up to ±15 degrees. Reynolds number effect on drag and lift coefficients was studied and wind averaged drag coefficients were calculated. The numerical calculations used a Reynolds-averaged, unsteady Navier-Stokes formulation. Both experimental and computational results are presented for back angles of 0-, 12.5-, and 25-degrees, then compared with each other and the data available in the literature.
Technical Paper

Experimental Investigation of Wake Boards for Drag Reduction on an Ahmed Body

2006-10-31
2006-01-3530
Commercial heavy trucks are characterized as bluffbodies and have unsteady wake flows and high base drag. Base drag has been studied for many years as a primary target for aerodynamic drag reduction. Many aftend devices have been created for active or passive reduction of base drag. Base flaps are one type of device that have shown promise for drag reduction. They consist of 3 or 4 panels joined at their edges to form an open box structure. Although base flaps have been shown to reduce drag, they have not been adopted by the trucking industry because they are inconvenient to deploy on a commercial scale. A practical refinement to base flaps is the two-panel wake board (WB). It is a commercially viable solution, with easy deployment and significant drag reduction. This paper presents experimental data for two-panel wake boards with varying width and inset on an Ahmed body at yaw angles up to 12 degrees.
Technical Paper

Development of the CELSS Emulator at NASA JSC

1989-07-01
891477
The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Emulator is under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) with the purpose to investigate computer simulations of integrated CELSS operations involving humans, plants, and process machinery. This paper describes Version 1.0 of the CELSS Emulator that was initiated in 1988 on the JSC Multi Purpose Applications Console Test Bed as the simulation framework. The run module of the simulation system now contains a CELSS model called BLSS. The CELSS Emulator empowers us to generate model data sets, store libraries of results for further analysis, and also display plots of model variables as a function of time. The progress of the project is presented with sample test runs and simulation display pages.
Technical Paper

Computational Simulations for the External Aerodynamics of Heavy Trucks

2000-12-04
2000-01-3501
An objective considered in designing the new generation of heavy trucks is fuel efficiency. This can be significantly improved by reducing the overall drag force on the truck when it is in motion. With this impetus, the external aerodynamics of a heavy truck was simulated using computational fluid dynamics and the external flow was presented using computer visualization. Initially, a thorough validation study was conducted on the Ahmed body. Consequently, the model and the method were selected to be the time-dependent, three dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations that are solved using a finite volume method. The RNG k-ε model was elected for closure of the turbulent quantities. Finally, to help the estimation of the error due to two commonly practiced engineering simplifications, a parametric study was conducted. The external flow around the truck was computed with and without the tires (-6% drag error), then with or without ground plane motion (+9% drag error).
Technical Paper

An Improved Green’s Function Code for HZE Ion Transport

2006-07-17
2006-01-2147
A new Green’s function code (GRNTRN) capable of simulating HZE ions with either laboratory or space boundary conditions is currently under development. The computational model consists of combinations of physical perturbation expansions based on the scales of atomic interaction, multiple scattering, and nuclear reactive processes with use of the Neumann-asymptotic expansions with non-perturbative corrections. The code contains energy loss due to straggling, nuclear attenuation, nuclear fragmentation with energy dispersion and downshifts. Recent publications have focused on code validation in the laboratory environment and have shown that the code predicts energy loss spectra accurately as measured by solid-state detectors in ion beam experiments. In this paper emphasis is placed on code validation with space boundary conditions.
Technical Paper

An Assessment of Drag Reduction Devices for Heavy Trucks Using Design of Experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamics

2005-11-01
2005-01-3526
Aerodynamic drag, lift, and side forces have a profound influence on fuel efficiency, vehicle speed, stability, acceleration and performance. All of these areas benefit from drag reduction and changing the lift force in favor of the operating conditions. The present study simulates the external flow field around a heavy truck with three prototype add-on drag reduction devices using a computational method. The model and the method are selected to be three dimensional and time-dependent. The Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved using a finite volume method. The Renormalization Group (RNG) k-ε model was elected for closure of the turbulent quantities. The run cases were chosen so that the influence of each drag reduction device could be established using a regression model from a Design of Experiments (DOEX) derived test matrix.
Technical Paper

Aerodynamic Characterization of a Sportscar Prototype Racecar Using Design of Experiments in a Wind Tunnel Test

2006-12-05
2006-01-3621
Application of a formally designed experiment to wind tunnel testing of a sportscar prototype was explored at the Langley Full Scale Tunnel. A two-level fractional factorial design with center points was used to determine the effect of front ride height, rear wing angle, gurney flap height, spoiler height, and yaw angle on the front downforce, rear downforce, drag, and lift-to-drag ratio of the racecar. Regression models were created for each of the responses to provide aerodynamic prediction and optimization capabilities. Prediction models provide an “aerodynamic mapping” that can be used for effective tuning of the car at the track as well as serve as a math model for numerical lap simulations.
Technical Paper

A Computer Simulation of the Effect of Wind on Heavy Truck Fuel Consumption Testing

2010-10-05
2010-01-2039
A computer simulation was developed to investigate the effect of wind on test track estimation of heavy truck fuel efficiency. Monte Carlo simulations were run for various wind conditions, both with and without gusts, and for two different vehicle aerodynamic configurations. The vehicle configurations chosen for this study are representative of typical Class 8 tractor trailers and use wind tunnel measured drag polars for performance computations. The baseline (control) case is representative of a modern streamlined tractor and conventional trailer. The comparison (test) case is the baseline case with the addition of a trailer drag reduction device (trailer skirt). The integrated drag coefficient, overall required power, total fuel consumption, and average rate of fuel consumption were calculated for a heavy truck on an oval test track to show the effect of wind on test results.
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