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Technical Paper

The Role of Carboxylate-Based Coolants in Cast Iron Corrosion Protection

2001-03-05
2001-01-1184
Nitrites have long been added to heavy-duty coolant to inhibit iron cylinder liner corrosion initiated by cavitation. However, in heavy-duty use, nitrites deplete from the coolant, which then must be refortified using supplemental coolant additives (SCA's). Recently, carboxylates have also been found to provide excellent cylinder liner protection in heavy-duty application. Unlike nitrites, carboxylate inhibitors deplete slowly and thus do not require continual refortification with SCA's. In the present paper laboratory aging experiments shed light on the mechanism of cylinder liner protection by these inhibitors. The performance of carboxylates, nitrites and mixtures of the two inhibitors are compared. Results correlate well with previously published fleet data. Specifically, rapid nitrite and slow carboxylate depletion are observed. More importantly, when nitrite and carboxylates are used in combination, nitrite depletion is repressed while carboxylates deplete at a very slow rate.
Technical Paper

Testing of Welded and Machined A36 Steel T-Joint Configuration Specimens

2019-04-02
2019-01-0535
For this latest SAE Fatigue Design and Evaluation project, fatigue tests were run by loading, in bending, both welded and machined T-Joint specimens that have the same geometry. The test rig setup consisted of a horizontally mounted actuator, with pinned joints at both ends, where the load is applied to the top of the vertical leg of the “upside down T” of a T-Joint specimen, while the horizontal legs of the “upside down T” were clamped to the bedplate. Specimens were tested until failure or until the specimen was unable to carry the commanded load. They were cycled under constant amplitude (at several load levels and R ratios), block cycle, and variable amplitude loadings. Welded and machined T-Joint specimens of the same geometry were included in the test plan such that fatigue life predictions could be compared to test lives for each case. Those comparisons would demonstrate the methodology’s relative predictive ability to manage welds, residual stress, etc...
Technical Paper

Process Control Standards for Technology Development

1998-04-08
981502
Engineering new technology and products challenges managers to balance design innovation and program risk. To do this, managers need methods to judge future results to avoid program and product disasters. Besides the traditional prediction tools of schedule, simulations and “iron tests”, process control standards (with measurements) can also be applied to the development programs to mitigate risks. This paper briefly discusses the theory and case history behind some new process control methods and standards currently in place at Caterpillar's Electrical & Electronics department. Process standards reviewed in this paper include process mapping, ISO9001, process controls, and process improvement models (e.g. SEI's CMMs.)
Technical Paper

Model Based Design Accelerates the Development of Mechanical Locomotive Controls

2010-10-05
2010-01-1999
Smaller locomotives often use mechanical transmissions instead of diesel-electric drive systems typically used in larger locomotives. This paper discusses how Model Based Design was used to develop the complete drive train control system for a 24 ton sugar cane locomotive. A complete MATLAB Simulink machine model was built to fully test and verify the shift control logic, traction control, vehicle speed limiting, and braking control for this locomotive application before it was commissioned. The model included the engine, torque converter, planetary transmission, drive line, and steel on steel driving surface. Simulation was used to debug all control code and test and refine control strategies so that the initial field commissioning in remote Australia was executed very quickly with minimal engineering support required.
Technical Paper

Induction Hardening Simulation of Steel and Cast Iron Components

2002-03-19
2002-01-1557
The induction hardening process involves a complex interaction of electromagnetic heating, rapid cooling, metallurgical phase transformations, and mechanical behavior. Many factors including induction coil design, power, frequency, scanning velocity, workpiece geometry, material chemistry, and quench severity determine a process outcome. This paper demonstrates an effective application of a numerical analysis tool for understanding of induction hardening. First, an overview of the Caterpillar induction simulation tool is briefly discussed. Then, several important features of the model development are examined. Finally, two examples illustrating the use of the computer simulation tool for solving induction-hardening problems related to cracking and distortion are presented. These examples demonstrate the tool's ability to simulate changes in process parameters and latitude of modeling steel or cast iron.
Technical Paper

Fatigue Properties of Gray Cast Iron

1969-02-01
690471
The fatigue properties of gray cast iron are presented. Included in these properties are monotonic tension and compression data and cyclic strain control fatigue data. Estimations of fatigue properties determined from the measured fatigue data are compared to predicted fatigue properties based on static properties. Samples with average hardnesses of 171 and 213 Bhn iron were tested and the results compared. The results of this investigation revealed that the strain amplitude cycles-to-failure plot of gray cast iron was independent of hardness of the iron.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Total Fatigue Life Predictions of Welded and Machined A36 Steel T-Joints

2019-04-02
2019-01-0527
A new total fatigue life methodology was utilized to make fatigue life predictions, where total fatigue life is defined as crack initiation and subsequent crack propagation to a crack of known size or the component’s inability to carry load. Fatigue life predictions of an A36 steel T-joint geometry were calculated using the same total fatigue life methodology for both welded and machined test specimens that have the same geometry. The only significant difference between the two analyses was the inclusion of the measured weld residual stresses in the welded specimen life predictions. Constant amplitude tests at several load levels and R ratios were analyzed along with block cycle and variable amplitude loading tests. The accuracy of the life predictions relative to experimental test lives was excellent, with most within a factor of +/- two.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Single Gear Tooth and Cantilever Beam Bending Fatigue Testing of Carburized Steel

1995-02-01
950212
The bending fatigue performance of gears, cantilever beam specimens, and notched-axial specimens were evaluated and compared. Specimens were machined from a modified SAE-4118 steel, gas-carburized, direct-quenched and tempered. Bending fatigue specimens were characterized by light metallography to determine microstructure and prior austenite grain size, x-ray analysis for residual stress and retained austenite measurements, and scanning electron microscopy to evaluate fatigue crack initiation, propagation and overload. The case and core microstructures, prior austenite grain sizes and case hardness profiles from the various types of specimens were similar. Endurance limits were determined to be about 950 MPa for both the cantilever beam and notched-axial fatigue specimens, and 1310 MPa for the single gear tooth specimens.
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