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Technical Paper

Throttle Icing: Understanding the Icing Mechanism and Effects of Various Throttle Features

2008-04-14
2008-01-0439
Some Electronic Throttle Control (ETC) Air Control Valves (ACV) on automotive internal combustion engines are susceptible to icing of the throttle valve. Ice formation can result in an increase in torque required to open or close the valve. Laboratory studies were conducted to improve the understanding of throttle valve icing on electronic throttle control valves with both aluminum and composite (plastic) bodies over various bore sizes (4 cylinder to 8 cylinder engines). Study results indicated that ice compression at the bore and valve gap, not ice adhesion, is the major contributor to the ETC-ACV icing phenomenon. In addition, testing of parts with various bore sizes, orientations and surface cleanliness resulted in further understanding of the icing issue.
Technical Paper

SAE Standard Procedure J2747 for Measuring Hydraulic Pump Airborne Noise

2007-05-15
2007-01-2408
This work discusses the development of SAE procedure J2747, “Hydraulic Pump Airborne Noise Bench Test”. This is a test procedure describing a standard method for measuring radiated sound power levels from hydraulic pumps of the type typically used in automotive power steering systems, though it can be extended for use with other types of pumps. This standard was developed by a committee of industry representatives from OEM's, suppliers and NVH testing firms familiar with NVH measurement requirements for automotive hydraulic pumps. Details of the test standard are discussed. The hardware configuration of the test bench and the configuration of the test article are described. Test conditions, data acquisition and post-processing specifics are also included. Contextual information regarding the reasoning and priorities applied by the development committee is provided to further explain the strengths, limitations and intended usage of the test procedure.
Technical Paper

Rollover Crash Sensing and Safety Overview

2004-03-08
2004-01-0342
This paper provides an overview of rollover crash safety, including field crash statistics, pre- and rollover dynamics, test procedures and dummy responses as well as a bibliography of pertinent literature. Based on the 2001 Traffic Safety Facts published by NHTSA, rollovers account for 10.5% of the first harmful events in fatal crashes; but, 19.5% of vehicles in fatal crashes had a rollover in the impact sequence. Based on an analysis of the 1993-2001 NASS for non-ejected occupants, 10.5% of occupants are exposed to rollovers, but these occupants experience a high proportion of AIS 3-6 injury (16.1% for belted and 23.9% for unbelted occupants). The head and thorax are the most seriously injured body regions in rollovers. This paper also describes a research program aimed at defining rollover sensing requirements to activate belt pretensioners, roof-rail airbags and convertible pop-up rollbars.
Technical Paper

Non-Intrusive Engine Speed Sensor

2007-04-16
2007-01-0960
In the field of vehicle diagnostics accurate instantaneous engine speed information enables the detection and diagnosis of many engine problems, even subtle ones. Currently, there is a limited choice in the ways of obtaining such information. For example, it is known that one can tap into the crank sensor wiring, or use a separate, intrusive method, such as mounting a sensor in the bell housing to sense the rotation of the ring gear. However, the shortcomings of these approaches are locating and gaining access to the crank sensor connector, the location of which varies from vehicle to vehicle. Thus, authors proposed a novel, robust and manufacturing friendly speed sensor. The concept is based on the Villari effect. The sensor, which is attached to the front end of the engine crankshaft, consists of a coil of magnetostrictive wire supplied with AC current. During engine rotation the magnetostrictive wire become stressed due to centrifugal force.
Technical Paper

Low Volatility Fuel Delivery Control during Cold Engine Starts

2005-04-11
2005-01-0639
The intensity of a combustion flame ionization current signal (ionsense) can be used to monitor and control combustion in individual cylinders during a cold engine start. The rapid detection of poor or absence of combustion can be used to determine fuel delivery corrections that may prevent engine stalls. With the ionsense cold start control active, no start failures were recorded even when the initially (prior to ionsense correction) commanded fueling had failed to produce a combustible mixture. This new dimension in fuel control allows for leaner cold start calibrations that would still be robust against the possible use of low volatility gasoline. Consequently, when California Phase 2 fuel is used, cold start hydrocarbon emissions could be lowered without the risk of an engine stall if the appropriate fuel is replaced with a less volatile one.
Technical Paper

Logistics and Capability Implications of a Bradley Fighting Vehicle with a Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit

2004-03-08
2004-01-1586
Modern military ground vehicles are dependent not only on armor and munitions, but also on their electronic equipment. Advances in battlefield sensing, targeting, and communications devices have resulted in military vehicles with a wide array of electrical and electronic loads requiring power. These vehicles are typically designed to supply this power via a main internal combustion engine outfitted with a generator. Batteries are also incorporated to allow power to be supplied for a limited time when the engine is off. It is desirable to use a subset of the battlefield electronics in the vehicle while the engine is off, in a mode called “silent watch.” Operating time in this mode is limited, however, by battery capacity unless an auxiliary power unit (APU) is used or the main engines are restarted.
Technical Paper

Improving the Reliability of Squeak & Rattle Test

2005-05-16
2005-01-2539
The laboratory test method commonly known as “random vibration” is almost always used for Squeak & Rattle testing in today's automotive applications due to its obvious advantages: the convenience in simulating the real road input, the relatively low cost, and efficiency in obtaining the desired test results. Typically, Loudness N10 is used to evaluate the Squeak & Rattle (S&R) performance. However, due to the nature of random distribution of the excitation input, the repeatability of the loudness N10 measurements may vary significantly. This variation imposes a significant challenge when one is searching for a fine design improvement solution in minimizing S&R noise, such as a six-sigma study. This study intends to investigate (1) the range of the variations of random vibration control method as an excitation input with a given PSD, (2) the possibility of using an alternate control method (“time-history replication”) to produce the vibration of a given PSD for a S&R evaluation.
Technical Paper

Impact of Biodiesel Emission Products from a Multi-Cylinder Direct Injection Diesel Engine on Particulate Filter Performance

2009-04-20
2009-01-1184
As diesel emission regulations continue to increase, the use of exhaust aftertreatment systems containing, for example the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF) will become necessary in order to meet these stringent emission requirements. The addition of a DOC and DPF in conjunction with utilizing biodiesel fuels requires extensive research to study the implications that biodiesel blends have on emissions as well as to examine the effect on aftertreatment devices. The proceeding work discusses results from a 2006 VM Motori four-cylinder 2.8L direct injection diesel engine coupled with a diesel oxidation catalyst and catalyzed diesel particulate filter. Tests were done using ultra low sulfur diesel fuel blended with 20% choice white grease biodiesel fuel to evaluate the effects of biodiesel emission products on the performance and effectiveness of the aftertreatment devices and the effect of low temperature combustion modes.
Technical Paper

Hill Hold Moding

2005-04-11
2005-01-0786
A typical problem that is encountered by drivers of vehicles with manual transmissions is rollback on an incline. This occurs when the driver is trying to coordinate the release of the brake pedal with the release of the clutch pedal and application of the accelerator all at the same time. If not done in harmony, the vehicle will roll down the incline. While the Hill Hold function is a highly desirable feature in manual transmission vehicles, it also enhances the driving experience in automatic transmission vehicles equipped with hybrid powertrains. The Hill Hold feature supports the Stop and Go performance associated with a hybrid powertrain by holding the vehicle on an incline and preventing undesired motion. The objective of this paper is to describe the implementation of the Hill Hold feature using an electric and / or a hydraulic brake control system. The paper describes the moding states in implementing the Hill Hold function at various levels of design complexity.
Journal Article

Gasoline Fuel Injector Spray Measurement and Characterization - A New SAE J2715 Recommended Practice

2008-04-14
2008-01-1068
With increasingly stringent emissions regulations and concurrent requirements for enhanced engine thermal efficiency, a comprehensive characterization of the automotive gasoline fuel spray has become essential. The acquisition of accurate and repeatable spray data is even more critical when a combustion strategy such as gasoline direct injection is to be utilized. Without industry-wide standardization of testing procedures, large variablilities have been experienced in attempts to verify the claimed spray performance values for the Sauter mean diameter, Dv90, tip penetration and cone angle of many types of fuel sprays. A new SAE Recommended Practice document, J2715, has been developed by the SAE Gasoline Fuel Injection Standards Committee (GFISC) and is now available for the measurement and characterization of the fuel sprays from both gasoline direct injection and port fuel injection injectors.
Journal Article

Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI) - Diesel-like Efficiency with Low CO2 Emissions

2011-04-12
2011-01-1386
A single-cylinder engine was used to study the potential of a high-efficiency combustion concept called gasoline direct-injection compression-ignition (GDCI). Low temperature combustion was achieved using multiple injections, intake boost, and moderate EGR to reduce engine-out NOx and PM emissions engine for stringent emissions standards. This combustion strategy benefits from the relatively long ignition delay and high volatility of regular unleaded gasoline fuel. Tests were conducted at 6 bar IMEP - 1500 rpm using various injection strategies with low-to-moderate injection pressure. Results showed that triple injection GDCI achieved about 8 percent greater indicated thermal efficiency and about 14 percent lower specific CO2 emissions relative to diesel baseline tests on the same engine. Heat release rates and combustion noise could be controlled with a multiple-late injection strategy for controlled fuel-air stratification. Estimated heat losses were significantly reduced.
Journal Article

Fuel Efficiency Improvements from Lean, Stratified Combustion with a Solenoid Injector

2009-04-20
2009-01-1485
In light of the growing emphasis on CO2 emissions reduction, Delphi has undertaken an internal development program to show the fuel economy benefits of lean, stratified combustion with its outwardly-opening solenoid injector in a vehicle environment. This paper presents the status of this ongoing development activity which is not yet completed. Progress to date includes a logical progression from single- and multi-cylinder dynamometer engines to the vehicle environment. The solenoid-actuated injector used in this development has an outwardly-opening valve group to generate a hollow-cone spray with a stable, well-defined recirculation zone to support spray-guided stratification in the combustion chamber. The engine management system of the development vehicle was modified from series-production configuration by changing the engine control unit to permit function development and calibration.
Technical Paper

Experimental Evaluation of R134a Emission with Various Hose Constructions

2005-05-10
2005-01-2032
The focus of this paper is to understand, from experimental data, the R134a refrigerant emission rates of various hose materials due to permeation. This paper focuses on four main points for hose assembly emission of R134a: (1) characteristics of hose permeation in response to the effect of oil in R134a and the characteristics of hose permeation of vapor vs. liquid refrigerant; (2) conditioning of the hose material over time to reach steady state R134a emission; (3) the relative contribution of hose permeation and coupling emission to the overall hose assembly refrigerant emission; (4) transient emission rates due to transient temperature and pressure conditions. Studies include hoses with different materials and constructions resulting in various levels of R134a permeation.
Journal Article

Effects of Fuel Type on Dual SCR Aftertreatment for Lean NOx Reduction

2009-11-02
2009-01-2818
Global demand for alternative fuels to combat rising energy costs has sparked a renewed interest in catalysts that can effectively remediate NOx emissions resulting from combustion of a range of HC based fuels. Because many of these new engine technologies rely on lean operating environments to produce efficient power, the resulting emissions are also present in a lean atmosphere. While HCs are easily controlled in such environments, achieving high NOx conversion to N2 has continued to elude fully satisfactory solution. Until recently, most approaches have relied on catalysts with precious metals to either store NOx and subsequently release it as N2 under rich conditions, or use NH3 SCR catalysts with urea injection to reduce NOx under lean conditions. However, new improvements in Ag based technologies also look very promising for NOx reduction in lean environments.
Technical Paper

E-85 Fuel Corrosivity: Effects on Port Fuel Injector Durability Performance

2007-10-29
2007-01-4072
A study was conducted to investigate the effects of commercial E-85 fuel properties on Port Fuel Injector (PFI) durability performance. E-85 corrosivity, not lubricity, was identified as the primary property affecting injector performance. Relatively high levels of water, chloride and organic acid contamination, detected in commercial E-85 fuels sampled in the U.S. in 2006, were the focus of the study. Analysis results and analytical techniques for determining contaminant levels in and corrosivity of commercial E-85 fuels are discussed. Studies were conducted with E-85 fuels formulated to represent worst-case field fuels. In addition to contamination with water, chloride and organic acids, fuels with various levels of a typical ethanol corrosion inhibitor were tested in the laboratory to measure the effects on E-85 corrosivity. The effects of these E-85 contaminants on injector durability performance were also evaluated.
Journal Article

Dual SCR Aftertreatment for Lean NOx Reduction

2009-04-20
2009-01-0277
Low-cost lean NOx aftertreatment is one of the main challenges facing high-efficiency gasoline and diesel engines operating with lean mixtures. While there are many candidate technologies, they all offer tradeoffs. We have investigated a multi-component Dual SCR aftertreatment system that is capable of obtaining NOx reduction efficiencies of greater than 90% under lean conditions, without the use of precious metals or urea injection into the exhaust. The Dual SCR approach here uses an Ag HC-SCR catalyst followed by an NH3-SCR catalyst. In bench reactor studies from 150 °C to 500 °C, we have found, for modest C/N ratios, that NOx reacts over the first catalyst to predominantly form nitrogen. In addition, it also forms ammonia in sufficient quantities to react on the second NH3-SCR catalyst to improve system performance. The operational window and the formation of NH3 are improved in the presence of small quantities of hydrogen (0.1–1.0%).
Technical Paper

Design of an Automotive Grade Controller for In-Cylinder Pressure Based Engine Control Development

2007-04-16
2007-01-0774
This paper describes a new tool to capture cylinder pressure information, calculate combustion parameters, and implement control algorithms. There are numerous instrumentation and prototyping systems which can provide some or all of this capability. The Cylinder Pressure Development Controller (CPDC) is unique in that it uses advanced high volume automotive grade circuitry, packaging, and software methodologies. This approach provides insight regarding the implementation of cylinder pressure based controls in a production engine management system. A high performance data acquisition system is described along with a data reduction technique to minimize data processing requirements. The CPDC software architecture is discussed along with model-based algorithm development and autocoding. Finally, CPDC calculated combustion parameters are compared with those from a well established combustion analysis system and thermodynamic simulations.
Technical Paper

Design and Testing of a Prototype Midsize Parallel Hybrid-Electric Sport Utility

2004-10-25
2004-01-3062
The University of Wisconsin - Madison hybrid vehicle team has designed and constructed a four-wheel drive, charge sustaining, parallel hybrid-electric sport utility vehicle for entry into the FutureTruck 2003 competition. This is a multi-year project utilizing a 2002 4.0 liter Ford Explorer as the base vehicle. Wisconsin's FutureTruck, nicknamed the ‘Moolander’, weighs 2000 kg and includes a prototype aluminum frame. The Moolander uses a high efficiency, 1.8 liter, common rail, turbo-charged, compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engine supplying 85 kW of peak power and an AC induction motor that provides an additional 60 kW of peak power. The 145 kW hybrid drivetrain will out-accelerate the stock V6 powertrain while producing similar emissions and drastically reducing fuel consumption. The PNGV Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model predicts a Federal Testing Procedure (FTP) combined driving cycle fuel economy of 16.05 km/L (37.8 mpg).
Technical Paper

Design and Development of a 2-Step Rocker Arm

2007-04-16
2007-01-1285
2-Step variable-valve lift and timing is a high-value technology for the further development of automotive internal combustion engines. 2-Step valve train systems provide improved engine efficiency, emissions, and performance using components that are relatively low-cost and compatible with new and existing cylinder heads. This paper describes the design and development of a 2-Step rocker arm using a combination of analytical tools and physical testing. Prototype hardware was built to confirm the design. Performance and durability test results are presented.
Technical Paper

Cylinder Pressure-Based Control of Pre-Mixed Diesel Combustion

2007-04-16
2007-01-0773
Implementation of real-time combustion feedback for use in closed-loop combustion control is a technology that has potential to assist in the successful production implementation of advanced diesel combustion modes. Low-temperature, pre-mixed diesel combustion is presently of interest because it offers the ability to lower the engine-out emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). The need for lowering these two emissions is driven by tighter regulations enacted worldwide, especially the NOx limits in the United States. Reducing engine-out emissions eases the need for additional exhaust aftertreatment devices and their associated cost and mass. In this paper we will describe an experimental cylinder pressure-based control system and present both steady-state and transient results from a diesel engine employing a pre-mixed type of combustion.
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