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Technical Paper

“Rubber Coupling” at a 4×4 Transmition System

2003-11-18
2003-01-3684
There are many different vibration sources in a car. Engine, gears, road roughness, impacts against the wheels cause vibration and sound that can decrease the parts and the car durability as well as affect drivability, safety and passengers and community comfort. In 4×4 cars, some extra vibration sources are the parts responsible for transmitting the torque and power to the rear wheels. Each of them has their own vibration modes, excited mostly by its imbalance or by the second order engine vibration. The engine vibration is a very well known phenomena and the rear driveshaft is designed not to have any vibration mode in the range of frequencies that the engine works or its second order. The imbalance of a driveshaft is also a design requirement. That means, the acceptable imbalance of the driveshaft is limited to a maximum value.
Technical Paper

“Active Mass Absorber” at a 4×4 Transmition System

2003-11-18
2003-01-3682
The extensive use of rotative machines in the diverse branches of the modern world has made the rising undesirable mechanical and acoustic vibration levels to be a problem of special importance for the machines normal operation as for the communities that are each time more affected by the problem. It makes the study of vibration and acoustic phenomena also to be even more important and the applications of its concepts more sophisticated. Several are the concepts used for decreasing vibration levels, like common dampers, hydraulic dampers, active dampers, natural frequencies changes and others. The choice of use of one or another depends greatly on the engineering possibilities (weight, energy, physical space, other components functional interference, vibration levels, etc.) as well as the cost of implementation of each one.
Technical Paper

Weld Line Factors for Thermoplastics

2017-03-28
2017-01-0481
Weld lines occur when melt flow fronts meet during the injection molding of plastic parts. It is important to investigate the weld line because the weld line area can induce potential failure of structural application. In this paper, a weld line factor (W-L factor) was adopted to describe the strength reduction to the ultimate strength due to the appearance of weld line. There were two engineering thermoplastics involved in this study, including one neat PP and one of talc filled PP plastics. The experimental design was used to investigate four main injection molding parameters (melt temperature, mold temperature, injection speed and packing pressure). Both the tensile bar samples with/without weld lines were molded at each process settings. The sample strength was obtained by the tensile tests under two levels of testing speed (5mm/min and 200mm/min) and testing temperatures (room temperature and -30°C). The results showed that different materials had various values of W-L factor.
Technical Paper

Wake Structures of Rectangular Bodies with Radiused Edges Near a Plane Surface

1999-03-01
1999-01-0648
Almost all published results of wake measurements for ground vehicles or similar shapes have included very limited information on streamwise development of wake structures. This is typically a result of the fact that the wake measurements have been conducted as parts of particular vehicle development efforts. So the focus has been on the incremental changes in the wakes associated with alternative geometries or buildup of various parts. The objectives are typically reached by limiting the surveys to a single streamwise plane. The present study, by contrast, is a study of wake development for a series of relatively simple rectangular shapes with radiused edges with a systematic variation in the ratio of height to width or “Aspect Ratio”.
Technical Paper

Virtual Exhaust Gas Temperature Measurement

2017-03-28
2017-01-1065
Exhaust temperature models are widely used in the automotive industry to estimate catalyst and exhaust gas temperatures and to protect the catalyst and other vehicle hardware against over-temperature conditions. Modeled exhaust temperatures rely on air, fuel, and spark measurements to make their estimate. Errors in any of these measurements can have a large impact on the accuracy of the model. Furthermore, air-fuel imbalances, air leaks, engine coolant temperature (ECT) or air charge temperature (ACT) inaccuracies, or any unforeseen source of heat entering the exhaust may have a large impact on the accuracy of the modeled estimate. Modern universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensors have heaters with controllers to precisely regulate the oxygen sensing element temperature. These controllers are duty cycle based and supply more or less current to the heating element depending on the temperature of the surrounding exhaust gas.
Technical Paper

Vibration Fatigue for Chassis-Mounted, Cantilevered Components

2017-03-28
2017-01-0360
Vehicle chassis mounted cantilevered components should meet two critical design targets: 1) NVH criterion to avoid resonance with road noise and engine vibration and 2) satisfied durability performance to avoid any incident in structure failure and dysfunction. Generally, two types of testing are performed to validate chassis mounted cantilevered component in the design process: shaker table testing and vehicle proving ground testing. Shaker table testing is a powered vibration endurance test performed with load input summarized from real proving ground data and accurate enough to replicate the physical test. The proving ground test is typically performed at critical milestones with full vehicles. Most tests are simplified lab testing to save cost and effort. CAE procedures that virtually replicate these lab tests is even more helpful in the design verification stages.
Journal Article

Vehicle Powertrain Thermal Management System Using Model Predictive Control

2016-04-05
2016-01-0215
An advanced powertrain cooling system with appropriate control strategy and active actuators allows greater flexibility in managing engine temperatures and operating near constraints. An organized controls development process is necessary to allow comparison of multiple configurations to select the best way forward. In this work, we formulate, calibrate and validate a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) for temperature regulation and constraint handling in an advanced cooling system. A model-based development process was followed; where the system model was used to develop and calibrate a gain scheduled linear MPC. The implementation of MPC for continuous systems and the modification related to implementing switching systems has been described. Multiple hardware configurations were compared with their corresponding control system in simulations. The system level requirements were translated into MPC calibration parameters for consistent comparison between multiple configurations.
Technical Paper

Vehicle Deep Data: A Case Study in Robust Scalable Data Collection

2017-03-28
2017-01-1651
Onboard, embedded cellular modems are enabling a range of new connectivity features in vehicles and rich, real-time data set transmissions from a vehicle’s internal network up to a cloud database are of particular interest. However, there is far too much information in a vehicle’s electrical state for every vehicle to upload all of its data in real-time. We are thus concerned with which data is uploaded and how that data is processed, structured, stored, and reported. Existing onboard data processing algorithms (e.g. for DTC detection) are hardcoded into critical vehicle firmware, limited in scope and cannot be reconfigured on the fly. Since many use cases for vehicle data analytics are still unknown, we require a system which is capable of efficiently processing and reporting vehicle deep data in real-time, such that data reporting can be switched on/off during normal vehicle operation, and that processing/reporting can be reconfigured remotely.
Technical Paper

Vane Pump Whining Noise Reduction by Vane Spacing Optimization

2019-04-02
2019-01-0841
A traditional vane type oil pump used inside the engines and the transmissions has equal angles or spacing between the vanes. The equal spacing intensifies pressure fluctuations generated within the pump leading to narrowband pressure spikes at the pump main order and its harmonics. Unequal spacing, however, can relax the severity of the spikes by breaking down the narrowband peaks and distributing them over a larger frequency range. Optimization of the angles within the pump design constraint can maximize the benefit of unequal spacing in reducing the pressure pulsations for a lower risk of engine or transmission whine. The scope of this paper is around the optimization process for vane spacing and different objective functions which can be used to obtain optimized solutions. The simulation results for optimized spacing based on two different objective functions for 7, 8 and 9 vanes are presented. The design constraints for the optimization are discussed as well.
Technical Paper

Using Camless Valvetrain for Air Hybrid Optimization

2003-03-03
2003-01-0038
The air-hybrid engine absorbs the vehicle kinetic energy during braking, puts it into storage in the form of compressed air, and reuses it to assist in subsequent vehicle acceleration. In contrast to electric hybrid, the air hybrid does not require a second propulsion system. This approach provides a significant improvement in fuel economy without the electric hybrid complexity. The paper explores the fuel economy potential of an air hybrid engine by presenting the modeling results of a 2.5L V6 spark-ignition engine equipped with an electrohydraulic camless valvetrain and used in a 1531 kg passenger car. It describes the engine modifications, thermodynamics of various operating modes and vehicle driving cycle simulation. The air hybrid modeling projected a 64% and 12% of fuel economy improvement over the baseline vehicle in city and highway driving respectively.
Technical Paper

Using Artificial Ash to Improve GPF Performance at Zero Mileage

2019-04-02
2019-01-0974
Gasoline particulate filters (GPF) with high filtration efficiency (>80%) at zero mileage are in growing demand to meet increasingly tight vehicle emission standards for particulate matter being implemented in US, EU, China and elsewhere. Current efforts to achieve high filter performance mainly focus on fine-tuning the filter structure, such as the pore size distribution and porosity of the bare substrate, or the washcoat loading and location of catalyzed substrates. However, high filtration efficiency may have a cost in high backpressure that negatively affects engine power. On the other hand, it has been recognized in a few reports that very low amounts of ash deposits (from non-combustible residue in the exhaust) can significantly increase filtration efficiency with only a mild backpressure increase.
Technical Paper

Use of Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Automotive Polymers in Recycling Operations

2000-03-06
2000-01-0739
To support its recycling efforts, Ford Motor Company is using a Raman based instrument, the RP-1, co-developed with SpectraCode Inc. to identify unknown polymeric parts. Our recycling initiative involves detailed dismantling of our vehicles into individual parts, calculating the percentage recyclability and making recommendations for the future use of recycled polymers. While Ford has voluntarily adopted the SAE J1344 marking protocol for identifying part material composition, a large number of unmarked parts still exist and require identification. This identification is being done with the help of RP-1. To facilitate this identification, we have generated an accurate reference library of Raman spectra for comparison to those of unknown materials. This paper will describe the techniques that were used to develop and refine the RP-1 reference library to identify automotive polymers, especially black/dark plastics.
Technical Paper

Use of Plastic Trim Fasteners for Automotive Trimming Applications

2017-03-28
2017-01-1304
For many years, the use of in-mold fasteners has been avoided for various reasons including: not fully understanding the load cases in the part, the fear of quality issues occurring, the need for servicing, or the lack of understanding the complexity of all failure modes. The most common solution has been the use of secondary operations to provide attachments, such as, screws, metal clips, heat staking, sonic welding or other methods which are ultimately a waste in the process and an increase in manufacturing costs. The purpose of this paper is to take the reader through the design process followed to design an in-molded attachment clip on plastic parts. The paper explores the design process for in-molded attachment clips beginning with a design concept idea, followed by basic concept testing using a desktop 3D printer, optimizing the design with physical tests and CAE analysis, and finally producing high resolution 3D prototypes for validation and tuning.
Technical Paper

Up-Front Body Structural Designs for Squeak and Rattle Prevention

2003-05-05
2003-01-1523
Squeak and rattle is one of the major concerns in vehicle design for customer satisfaction. Traditionally squeak and rattle problems are found and fixed at a very late design stage due to lack of up-front CAE prevention and prediction tools. A research work at Ford reveals a correlation between the squeak and rattle performance and diagonal distortions at body closure openings and fastener accelerations in an instrument panel. These findings make it possible to assess squeak and rattle performance implications between different body designs using body-in-prime (B-I-P) and vehicle low frequency noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) CAE models at a very early design stage. This paper is concerned with applications of this squeak and rattle assessment method for up-front body designs prior to a prototype stage.
Journal Article

Uncertainty Analysis of Model Based Diesel Particulate Filter Diagnostics

2008-10-07
2008-01-2648
This paper analyzes the potential benefit of a model based DPF leakage monitor over a conventional DPF leakage monitor that checks pressure drop after a complete regeneration. We analyze the most important noise factors involved in both approaches and demonstrate that the model based leakage monitor does not improve on the conventional leakage monitor in accuracy. It does improve on completion frequency, but at the expense of a great modeling effort.
Journal Article

Twin-LNT System for Advanced Diesel Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment

2017-03-28
2017-01-0935
The most significant challenge in emission control for compression ignited internal combustion engines is the suppression of NOx. In the US, NOx-levels have faced a progressive reduction for several years, but recently the introduction of the Real Driving Emissions legislation (RDE) in Europe has not only significantly increased the severity of the required emission reduction but now is in the advent of stretching technology to its limits. Emission control is based on engine-internal optimization to reduce the engine-out emissions in conjunction with aftertreatment technologies, that are either Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) or Lean NOx Trap (LNT) based systems. Due to its ability to control high amounts of NOx, SCR is widely used in heavy-duty applications and is becoming more popular in light-duty and passenger car applications as well.
Technical Paper

Turbocharging the 1983½-1984 Ford 2.3L OHC Engine

1984-02-01
840251
Successful application of turbocharger technology to the Ford 2.3L OHC engine requires management of thermal loading. The 1979/1980 2.3L draw-thru carbureted engine was octane and spark advance limited, requiring calibration to worse case 91 RON conditions. Since no adaptive calibration control was possible relatively late ignition timing compromised engine performance. To improve performance, driveability, fuel economy and emission control, work was initiated in mid 1980 on a blow-thru electronic fuel injected engine scheduled for 1983½ production. Program assumptions were issued specifying a tuned EFI blow-thru inlet system, exhaust manifold mounted AiResearch T03 turbocharger with integral wastegate and 8.0:1 compression ratio with a dished piston. Also included were base engine revisions to accommodate increased thermal and mechanical loads.
Technical Paper

Turbocharger First Order Synchronous Noise and Vibrations: Predictions and Measurements

2017-03-28
2017-01-1051
EcoBoost engines constitute one of the strategies used by Ford Motor Company to deliver engines with improved fuel economy and performance. However, turbochargers exhibit many inherent NVH challenges that need to be addressed in order to deliver refined engines that meet customer’s expectation. One of these challenges is the turbocharger 1st order synchronous noise due to the interaction between the manufacturing tolerances of the rotating components and the dynamic behavior of the rotor. This paper discusses an MBD/FEA/BEM based method to predict the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the rotor semi floating bearing, its impact on the bearing loads and the resulting powerplant noise due to the interaction with the turbocharger imbalance level.
Technical Paper

Transmission Main Control Orifice Flow Characteristics and Correlations

2004-03-08
2004-01-1639
In this paper we describe the application of a CFD methodology to characterize the orifice flows over a wide range of flow conditions with various geometrical features commonly found in hydraulic control systems. There are three objectives in carrying out this study. First, apply CFD analyses to provide physical insight into the orifice flow physics and clarify the use of relevant engineering parameters critical to hydraulic control applications. Second, quantify orifice discharge coefficient with respect to orifice diameter ratio, cross-sectional shape, plate thickness, orifice entrance and exit geometries. Third, support physical test and establish building block elements for hydraulic system modeling. The results obtained from CFD calculations agree very well with available data published in professional handbooks and fluid mechanics related textbooks, especially in the high Reynolds number flow regime.
Technical Paper

Transient Non-linear FEA and TMF Life Estimates of Cast Exhaust Manifolds

2003-03-03
2003-01-0918
A transient nonlinear Finite Element Analysis (FEA) method has been developed to simulate the inelastic deformation and estimate the thermo-mechanical fatigue life of cast iron and cast steel exhaust manifolds under dynamometer test conditions. The FEA uses transient heat transfer analysis to simulate the thermal loads on the manifold, and includes the fasteners, gasket and portion of the cylinder head. The analysis incorporates appropriate elastic-plastic and creep material models. It is shown that the creep deformation is the most single critical component of inelastic deformation for cast iron manifold ratcheting, gasket sealing, and crack initiation. The predicted transient temperature field and manifold deformation of the FEA model compares exceptionally well with two experimental tests for a high silicon-molybdenum exhaust manifold.
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