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Technical Paper

The Northstar DOHC V-8 Engine for Cadillac

1992-02-01
920671
General Motors Powertrain Division has developed a new V-8 engine for Cadillac vehicles in the 1990s. The Northstar engine incorporates the use of aluminum for both the cylinder block and head and other lightweight materials throughout. The valve train incorporates direct acting hydraulic lifters actuating the four valves per cylinder through dual overhead camshafts. The primary focus of the project has been to produce an engine of unquestioned reliability and exceptional value which is pleasing to the customer throughout the range of loads and speeds. The engine was designed with a light weight valve train, low valve overlap and moderate lift, resulting in a very pleasing combination of smooth idle and a broad range of power. The use of analytical methods early in the design stage enabled systems to be engineered to optimize reliability, pleaseability and value by reducing frictional losses, noise, and potential leak paths, while increasing efficiency and ease of manufacture.
Technical Paper

Reliability and Maintainability of Machinery and Equipment for Effective Maintenance

1993-03-01
930569
Typically, “Reliability and Maintainability (R&M)” is perceived as a tool for products alone. Putting emphasis on reliability only at the cost of maintainability is another archetype. Inclusion of both reliability and maintainability (R&M) in all the phases of the machinery and equipment (M&E) life cycle is required in order to be world competitive in manufacturing. R&M is mainly a design function and it should be a part of any design review. Inclusion of the R&M concept early in the life cycle of M&E is key to cost effective and competitive manufacturing. Neither responsive manufacturing nor preventive maintenance can raise it above the level of inherent R&M.
Technical Paper

Front Suspension Multi-Axis Testing

1987-11-01
872255
A front suspension laboratory test procedure was developed to reproduce time-correlated fatigue damaging events from a light truck road durability test. Subsequently, the performance of front suspension systems for the GMT 400 light truck program were evaluated in terms of customer reliability. Both prototype and pilot testing, as well as computer modeling, were used in the evaluation.
Technical Paper

Development of Skin Thermal Transducer for Automotive Applications

1997-05-19
971855
This paper summarizes the design, development, fabrication, validation, and application of a new device called the Skin Thermal Transducer (STT). The development of this instrument was driven by the demand for reliable information on human skin temperatures during contact with a warm surface on the interior of an automobile. The primary technology that enabled the development of the STT was the thermo-electric cooler (TEC) in combination with a heat sink that is used to simulate the core temperature of the human body. The STT was validated with human skin data and the agreement was within an acceptable range. The STT provides the automotive engineer with a measuring device to optimize and validate the underbody regions of the vehicle with respect to occupant thermal comfort. The STT can also be applied to optimize other automotive and non-automotive products in which the human skin touches a warm surface.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Designs for Safety/Mission Critical Systems

2005-04-11
2005-01-0775
We investigate and analyze the concept of “missed detection” and its application to the design of architectures that integrate multiple safety/mission critical functions. The analysis is based on considering different design alternatives with varying levels of missed fault detection of the components constituting the functions or subsystems. The overall system reliability and availability in a fault tolerant architecture relies as heavily on the ability to detect a fault as it does on being able to prevent a fault as one would attempt by having multiple levels of redundancy and/or improved reliability of the components in such an architecture. In short, the safety of a particular architecture depends not only on component reliability, and fault tolerance, expressed as redundancy, but also on fault detectability.
Technical Paper

Assessing Required Levels of Redundancy for Composite Safety/Mission Critical Systems

2004-03-08
2004-01-1664
We investigate and analyze the concept of “shared redundancy” and its application to the design of architectures that integrate multiple safety/mission critical functions or subsystems. The analysis is based on considering different design alternatives with varying levels of physical redundancy of the components constituting the functions or subsystems. Under a set of assumptions, we show that the overall system reliability and availability in a shared redundancy based architecture can be improved without increasing the levels of physical redundancy for the components employed at the subsystem level. However, such an improvement will be limited by the component(s) with the minimal level of redundancy.
Technical Paper

Assessing Error in Reliability Estimates Obtained via CAE Simulations

2003-03-03
2003-01-0146
When using a math model to estimate the failure rate of a product, or the mean and standard deviation of performance characteristics of the product, one important issue is the accuracy of the estimates. All math models have error. This error will be transmitted to the error in the estimates of failure rate, mean, and standard deviation. This paper presents a method to calculate the bounds on the transmitted error, which can then be used to 1) obtain confidence bounds on estimates of mean, standard deviation, and failure rate; and 2) establish accuracy requirements on math models.
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