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Journal Article

Vehicle Integration Factors Affecting Brake Caliper Drag

2012-09-17
2012-01-1830
Disc brakes operate with very close proximity of the brake pads and the brake rotor, with as little as a tenth of a millimeter of movement of the pads required to bring them into full contact with the rotor to generate braking torque. It is usual for a disc brake to operate with some amount of residual drag in the fully released state, signifying constant contact between the pads and the rotor. With this contact, every miniscule movement of the rotor pushes against the brake pads and changes the forces between them. Sustained loads on the brake corner, and maneuvers such as cornering, can both produce rotor movement relative to the caliper, which can push it steadily against one or both of the brake pads. This can greatly increase the residual force in the caliper, and increase drag. This dependence of drag behavior on the movement of the brake rotor creates some vehicle-dependent behavior.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Wheel Assembly Non Uniformity on Disc Brake Lateral Runout

2011-09-18
2011-01-2378
The importance of achieving good (low) assembled lateral runout of the brake disc is well recognized in the industry - it is a critical feature for avoiding issues such as wear-induced disc thickness variation and vibration/shudder during braking. Significant efforts and expense has been invested by the industry into reducing disc brake lateral runout. However, wheel assemblies also have some inherent runout, which in turn cause cyclical forces to act on the brake corner during vehicle movement. Despite the stiffness of the wheel bearing (which aligns the brake disc with the caliper and knuckle), these “tire non-uniformity” forces can be sufficient to promote deflection of the assembly that is appreciable compared to typical disc lateral runout tolerances. This paper covers measurements of this phenomenon on three different vehicles (compact, mid-size, and large cars), under a variety of operating conditions such as speed, wheel assembly runout, and wheel assembly balance.
Video

Test Method for Seat Wrinkling and Bagginess

2012-05-22
This study evaluates utilizing an accelerated test method that correlates customer interaction with a vehicle seat where bagginess and wrinkling is produced. The evaluation includes correlation from warranty returns as well as test vehicle results for test verification. Consumer metrics will be discussed within this paper with respect to potential application of this test method, including but not limited to JD Power ratings. The intent of the test method is to aid in establishing appropriate design parameters of the seat trim covers and to incorporate appropriate design measures such as tie downs and lamination. This test procedure was utilized in a Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) project as an aid in optimizing seat parameters influencing trim cover performance using a Design of Experiment approach. Presenter Lisa Fallon, General Motors LLC
Journal Article

Sizing Next Generation High Performance Brake Systems with Copper Free Linings

2017-09-17
2017-01-2532
The high performance brake systems of today are usually in a delicate balance - walking the fine line between being overpowered by some of the most potent powertrains, some of the grippiest tires, and some of the most demanding race tracks that the automotive world has ever seen - and saddling the vehicle with excess kilograms of unsprung mass with oversized brakes, forcing significant compromises in drivability with oversized tires and wheels. Brake system design for high performance vehicles has often relied on a very deep understanding of friction material performance (friction, wear, and compressibility) in race track conditions, with sufficient knowledge to enable this razor’s edge design.
Technical Paper

Simple Robust Formulations for Engineers: An Alternate to Taguchi S/N

2020-04-14
2020-01-0604
Robust engineering is an integral part of the quality initiative, Design For Six Sigma (DFSS), in most companies to enable good designs and products for reliability and durability. Taguchi’s signal-to-noise ratio has been considered as a good performance index for robustness since many decades. An alternate approach that is direct and simple for measuring robustness is proposed. In this approach, robustness is measured in terms of an augmented output response and it is a composite index of variation and efficiency of a system. This formulation represents the engineering design intent of a product in a statistical sense, so engineers can understand, communicate, and resonate at ease. Illustrative formulations with case studies are discussed with respect to smaller-the-better, nominal-the-best, and dynamic responses. Confirmation runs of optimization show good agreement of the augmented response with the predictive models that are based on the additivity principle.
Technical Paper

Process-Monitoring-for-Quality — A Step Forward in the Zero Defects Vision

2020-04-14
2020-01-1302
More than four decades ago the concept of zero defects was coined by Phillip Crosby. At that time it was only a vision, but today with the introduction of Artificial Intelligence in manufacturing it has become attainable. Since most mature manufacturing organizations have merged traditional quality philosophies and techniques, their processes generate only a few defects per million of opportunities. Therefore, detecting these rare quality events is one of the modern intellectual challenges posed by this industry. Process Monitoring for Quality is a big data-driven quality philosophy aimed at defect detection and empirical knowledge discovery. Detection is formulated as a binary classification problem, where the right machine learning, optimization and statistics techniques are applied to develop an effective predictive system.
Journal Article

On Designing Software Architectures for Next-Generation Multi-Core ECUs

2015-04-14
2015-01-0177
Multi-core systems are promising a cost-effective solution for (1) advanced vehicle features requiring dramatically more software and hence an order of magnitude more processing power, (2) redundancy and mixed-IP, mixed-ASIL isolation required for ISO 26262 functional safety, and (3) integration of previously separate ECUs and evolving embedded software business models requiring separation of different software parts. In this context, designing, optimizing and verifying the mapping and scheduling of software functions onto multiple processing cores becomes key. This paper describes several multi-core task design and scheduling design options, including function-to-task mapping, task-to-core allocation (both static and dynamic), and associated scheduling policies such as rate-monotonic, criticality-aware priority assignment, period transformation, hierarchical partition scheduling, and dynamic global scheduling.
Technical Paper

NVH Design, Analysis and Optimization of Chevrolet Bolt Battery Electric Vehicle

2018-04-03
2018-01-0994
A multi-stage system level method is used to design, optimize and enhance electric motor NVH performance of General Motors’ Chevrolet Bolt battery electric vehicle (BEV). First, the rotor EM (electromagnetic) design optimizes magnet placement between adjacent poles asymmetrically, along with a pair of small slots stamped near the rotor outer surface to lower torque ripple and radial force. The size and placement of stator slot openings under each pole are optimized to lower torque ripple and radial force. Next, motor stator level FE (Finite Element) analysis and modal test correlation are performed to benchmark the orthotropic stator material properties and accurately predict modal results within 7% error below 2 kHz. Furthermore, tangential and radial EM forces are applied on motor-in-fixture subsystem FE model, which predicts surface vibration and pseudo sound power on the motor housing.
Technical Paper

N&V Component Structural Integration and Mounted Component Durability Implications

2020-04-14
2020-01-1396
Exterior component integration has presented competing integration challenges for suitable exterior styling, safety, N&V structural feel and component durability balanced performances. Industry standard practice of N&V vehicle mode mapping uses vehicle source, path and receiver considerations for component mode frequency placement. Mounted component mode frequency performance can have an influence on structural feel and durability performances. Component integration headwinds have increased with additional nonstructural component styling content, component size, component mass and added sensor modules. Based on first principles, the effective mass of exterior mounted components are increased due to the geometric overhang from structure. Component input vibration levels are compounded due to the cantilevered nature as well as relative positioning to the suspension and propulsion vehicle source inputs locations.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Stiffness and Damping Properties of Styrene-Butadiene Rubber

2011-05-17
2011-01-1628
Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR), a copolymer of butadiene and styrene, is widely used in the automotive industry due to its high durability and resistance to abrasion, oils and oxidation. Some of the common applications include tires, vibration isolators, and gaskets, among others. This paper characterizes the dynamic behavior of SBR and discusses the suitability of a visco-elastic model of elastomers, known as the Kelvin model, from a mathematical and physical point of view. An optimization algorithm is used to estimate the parameters of the Kelvin model. The resulting model was shown to produce reasonable approximations of measured dynamic stiffness. The model was also used to calculate the self heating of the elastomer due to energy dissipation by the viscous damping components in the model. Developing such a predictive capability is essential in understanding the dynamic behavior of elastomers considering that their dynamic stiffness can in general depend on temperature.
Technical Paper

Modeling Articulated Brake Component Wear to Assist with Routing Decisions

2018-10-05
2018-01-1890
Very few activities the brake engineer engages in can induce as much vexation as trying to find a satisfying routing for the flexible brake components such as hoses, wheel speed sensors, and electric parking brake cables. Ever increasing wheel end content, ever decreasing space, more complex suspensions, and bulkier (but lighter weight) suspension components provide quite the morass through which the components must be routed through. When routing is finalized - and free of any major issues - there frequently remains some combinations of articulation position and component tolerances that allow a light “friendly” touch between components (such as a sensor wire and a surface of a bracket or strut tube), or near misses where clearance exists but raises “what if” questions around what would happen if the tolerances would stack up slightly differently on another vehicle.
Journal Article

Lockheed Martin Low-Speed Wind Tunnel Acoustic Upgrade

2018-04-03
2018-01-0749
The Lockheed Martin Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) is a closed-return wind tunnel with two solid-wall test sections. This facility originally entered into service in 1967 for aerodynamic research of aircraft in low-speed and vertical/short take-off and landing (V/STOL) flight. Since this time, the client base has evolved to include a significant level of automotive aerodynamic testing, and the needs of the automotive clientele have progressed to include acoustic testing capability. The LSWT was therefore acoustically upgraded in 2016 to reduce background noise levels and to minimize acoustic reflections within the low-speed test section (LSTS). The acoustic upgrade involved detailed analysis, design, specification, and installation of acoustically treated wall surfaces and turning vanes in the circuit as well as low self-noise acoustic wall and ceiling treatment in the solid-wall LSTS.
Technical Paper

Liftgate Structure Optimization to Minimize Contribution to Low Frequency Interior Noise

2020-04-14
2020-01-1264
This paper presents the design development of a SUV liftgate with the intention of minimizing low frequency noise. Structure topology optimization techniques were applied both to liftgate and body FEA models to reduce radiated sound power from the liftgate inner surface. Topology results are interpreted into structural changes to the original liftgate and body design. Favorable results of sound power performance with reduced cost and mass is shown compared to baseline liftgate and baseline with TVA (tuned vibration absorber). This simulation includes finite element modeling of coupled fluid/structure interaction between the interior air cavity volume and liftgate structure. In addition to sound power minimization, multi-model optimization (MMO) was used on separate models simultaneously to preserve liftgate structural performance for several customer usage load cases.
Technical Paper

Leveraging real-world driving data sets for design and impact evaluation of energy efficient control strategies.

2020-04-14
2020-01-0585
Modeling and simulation are crucial in the development of advanced energy efficient control strategies. Utilizing real-world driving data as the underlying basis for control design and simulation lends veracity to projected real-world energy savings. Standardized drive cycles are limited in their utility for evaluating advanced driving strategies that utilize connectivity and on-vehicle sensing, primarily because they are non-causal and are typically intended for evaluating emission and fuel economy under controlled conditions. Real-world driving data, because of its scale, is a useful representation of various road types, driving styles, and driving environments. The scale of real-world data also presents challenges in effectively using it in simulations. A fast and efficient simulation methodology is necessary to handle the large number of simulations performed for design analysis and impact evaluation of control strategies.
Technical Paper

Large Scale Multi-Disciplinary Optimization and Long-Term Drive Cycle Simulation

2020-04-14
2020-01-1049
Market demands for increased fuel economy and reduced emissions are placing higher aerodynamic and thermal analysis demands on vehicle designers and engineers. These analyses are usually carried out by different engineering groups in different parts of the design cycle. Design changes required to improve vehicle aerodynamics often come at the price of part thermal performance and vice versa. These design changes are frequently a fix for performance issues at a single performance point such as peak power, peak torque, or highway cruise. In this paper, the motivation for a holistic approach in the form of multi-disciplinary optimization (MDO) early in the design process is presented. Using a Response-surface Informed Transient Thermal Model (RITThM) a vehicles thermal performance through a drive cycle is predicted and correlated to physical testing for validation.
Journal Article

Iterative Learning Algorithm Design for Variable Admittance Control Tuning of A Robotic Lift Assistant System

2017-03-28
2017-01-0288
The human-robot interaction (HRI) is involved in a lift assistant system of manufacturing assembly line. The admittance model is applied to control the end effector motion by sensing intention from force of applied by a human operator. The variable admittance including virtual damping and virtual mass can improve the performance of the systems. But the tuning process of variable admittance is un-convenient and challenging part during the real test for designers, while the offline simulation is lack of learning process and interaction with human operator. In this paper, the Iterative learning algorithm is proposed to emulate the human learning process and facilitate the variable admittance control design. The relationship between manipulate force and object moving speed is demonstrated from simulation data. The effectiveness of the approach is verified by comparing the simulation results between two admittance control strategies.
Technical Paper

Initial Comparisons of Friction Stir Spot Welding and Self Piercing Riveting of Ultra-Thin Steel Sheet

2018-04-03
2018-01-1236
Due to the limitations on resistance spot welding of ultra-thin steel sheet (thicknesses below 0.5 mm) in high-volume automotive manufacturing, a comparison of friction stir spot welding and self-piercing riveting was performed to determine which process may be more amenable to enabling assembly of ultra-thin steel sheet. Statistical comparisons between mechanical properties of lap-shear tensile and T-peel were made in sheet thickness below 0.5 mm and for dissimilar thickness combinations. An evaluation of energy to fracture, fracture mechanisms, and joint consistency is presented.
Technical Paper

Identification of Organic Acids in Used Engine Oil Residues by Pyrolysis-Comprehensive 2D Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

2016-10-17
2016-01-2274
The amount of acidic material in used engine oil is considered an indicator of the remaining useful life of the oil. Total acid number, determined by titration, is the most widely accepted method for determining acidic content but the method is not capable of speciation of individual acids. In this work, high molecular weight residue was isolated from used engine oil by dialysis in heptane. This residue was then analyzed using pyrolysis-comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Carboxylic acids from C2-C18 were identified in the samples with acetic acid found to be the most abundant. This identification provides new information that may be used to improve the current acid detection methodologies for used engine oils.
Technical Paper

High Voltage Hybrid Battery Tray Design Optimization

2011-04-12
2011-01-0671
Hybrid high voltage battery pack is not only heavy mass but also large in dimension. It interacts with the vehicle through the battery tray. Thus the battery tray is a critical element of the battery pack that interfaces between the battery and the vehicle, including the performances of safety/crash, NVH (modal), and durability. The tray is the largest and strongest structure in the battery pack holding the battery sections and other components including the battery disconnect unit (BDU) and other units that are not negligible in mass. This paper describes the mass optimization work done on one of the hybrid batteries using CAE simulation. This was a multidisciplinary optimization project, in which modal performance and fatigue damage were accessed through CAE analysis at both the battery pack level, and at the vehicle level.
Journal Article

General Motors’ New Reduced Scale Wind Tunnel Center

2017-03-28
2017-01-1534
The General Motors Reduced Scale Wind Tunnel Facility, which came into operation in the fall of 2015, is a new state-of-the-art scale model aerodynamic test facility that expands GM’s test capabilities. The new facility also increases GM’s aerodynamic testing through-put and provides the resources needed to achieve the growing demand for higher fuel economy requirements for next generation of vehicles. The wind tunnel was designed for a nominal model scale of 40%. The nozzle and test section were sized to keep wind tunnel interference effects to a minimum. Flow quality and other wind tunnel performance parameters are on par with or better than the latest industry standards. A 5-belt system with a long center belt and boundary layer suction and blowing system are used to model underbody flow conditions. An overhead probe traverse system is installed in the test section along with a model positioning robot used to move the model in an out of the test section.
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