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Technical Paper

Three Dimensional Simulation of Flow in an Axial Low Pressure Compressor at Engine Icing Operating Points

2015-06-15
2015-01-2132
Three-dimensional simulations of the Honeywell ALF502 low pressure compressor (sometimes called a booster) using the NASA Glenn code GlennHT have been carried out. A total of eight operating points were investigated. These operating points are at, or near, points where engine icing has been determined to be likely. The results of this study were used, in a companion paper, for further analysis such as predicting collection efficiency of ice particles and ice growth rates at various locations in the compressor. In an effort to minimize computational effort, inviscid solutions with slip walls are produced. A mixing plane boundary condition is used between each blade row, resulting in convergence to steady state within each blade row. Comparisons of the results are made to other simplified analysis. An additional modification to the simulation process is also presented.
Technical Paper

The Influence of SLD Drop Size Distributions on Ice Accretion in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

2019-06-10
2019-01-2022
An ice shape database has been created to document ice accretions on a 21-inch chord NACA0012 model and a 72-inch chord NACA 23012 airfoil model resulting from an exposure to a Supercooled Large Drop (SLD) icing cloud with a bimodal drop size distribution. The ice shapes created were documented with photographs, laser scanned surface measurements over a section of the model span, and measurement of the ice mass over the same section of each accretion. The icing conditions used in the test matrix were based upon previously used conditions on the same models but with an alternate approach to evaluation of drop distribution effects. Ice shapes resulting from the bimodal distribution as well as from equivalent monomodal drop size distributions were obtained and compared.
Technical Paper

Recent Advances in the LEWICE Icing Model

2015-06-15
2015-01-2094
This paper will describe two recent modifications to the LEWICE software. The version described is under development and not ready for release. First, a capability for modeling ice crystals and mixed phase icing has been modified based on recent experimental data. Modifications have been made to the ice particle bouncing and erosion model. This capability has been added as part of a larger effort to model ice crystal ingestion in aircraft engines. Comparisons have been made to ice crystal ice accretions performed in the NRC Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac). Second, modifications were made to the runback model based on data and observations from thermal scaling tests performed in the NRC Altitude Icing Tunnel. The runback model was modified to match film models used in the open literature. An empirical water shedding was also implemented. Comparisons were made to thermal deicing data taken at the NRC Altitude Icing Tunnel.
Technical Paper

Radar Detection of High Concentrations of Ice Particles - Methodology and Preliminary Flight Test Results

2019-06-10
2019-01-2028
High Ice Water Content (HIWC) has been identified as a primary causal factor in numerous engine events over the past two decades. Previous attempts to develop a remote detection process utilizing modern commercial radars have failed to produce reliable results. This paper discusses the reasons for previous failures and describes a new technique that has shown very encouraging accuracy and range performance without the need for any modifications to industry’s current radar design(s). The performance of this new process was evaluated during the joint NASA/FAA HIWC RADAR II Flight Campaign in August of 2018. Results from that evaluation are discussed, along with the potential for commercial application, and development of minimum operational performance standards for future radar products.
Technical Paper

Progress in Rotorcraft Icing Computational Tool Development

2015-06-15
2015-01-2088
The formation of ice over lifting surfaces can affect aerodynamic performance. In the case of helicopters, this loss in lift and the increase in sectional drag forces will have a dramatic effect on vehicle performance. The ability to predict ice accumulation and the resulting degradation in rotor performance is essential to determine the limitations of rotorcraft in icing encounters. The consequences of underestimating performance degradation can be serious and so it is important to produce accurate predictions, particularly for severe icing conditions. The simulation of rotorcraft ice accretion is a challenging multidisciplinary problem that until recently has lagged in development over its counterparts in the fixed wing community. But now, several approaches for the robust coupling of a computational fluid dynamics code, a rotorcraft structural dynamics code and an ice accretion code have been demonstrated.
Technical Paper

Performance Modeling of Honeywell Turbofan Engine Tested with Ice Crystal Ingestion in the NASA Propulsion System Laboratory

2015-06-15
2015-01-2133
The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center, has been used to test a full scale Honeywell turbofan engine at simulated altitude operating conditions. The PSL has spray bars to create a continuous cloud of fully glaciated ice crystals. The tests successfully duplicated the icing events that were experienced by the Honeywell engine (ALF502R-5) during flight through ice crystal clouds. After the ice cloud was turned on key engine performance parameters such as the fan speed, air flow rate, fuel flow rate, and compressor exit pressure and temperature responded immediately to the ingestion of the ice crystals. For some of the test points, these performance parameters remained unchanged from the initial response to the ice crystals, while during other test points the engine performance began to deteriorate to the point where an uncommanded loss of thrust control (engine rollback) was judged by the test engineers to have been imminent.
Technical Paper

Naturally Aspirating Isokinetic Total Water Content Probe: Wind Tunnel Test Results and Design Modifications

2011-06-13
2011-38-0036
A total water content probe for flight- and ground-based testing is being completed. During operation across a range of altitudes and water content conditions, the probe has to maintain isokinetic flow, vaporize the solid and liquid water content and maintain the inlet ice free to ensure isokinetic flow. Despite achieving isokinetic operation, the collection efficiency of particles less than 30 μm can be less than 100%. A correlation of collection efficiency to Stokes number has been determined to correct the results for this effect. In preparation for flight testing an integrated data acquisition, control and power supply unit was developed and successfully tested. Results from testing at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel are presented covering both ice crystals and super-cooled liquid conditions. The results correspond well to previously published work and problems encountered during previous testing of this probe are shown to have been resolved.
Technical Paper

Measured Interfacial Residual Strains Produced by In-Flight Ice

2019-06-10
2019-01-1998
The formation of ice on aircraft is a highly dynamic process during which ice will expand and contract upon freezing and undergoing changes in temperature. Finite element analysis (FEA) simulations were performed investigating the stress/strain response of an idealized ice sample bonded to an acrylic substrate subjected to a uniform temperature change. The FEA predictions were used to guide the placement of strain gages on custom-built acrylic and aluminum specimens. Tee rosettes were placed in two configurations adjacent to thermocouple sensors. The specimens were then placed in icing conditions such that ice was grown on top of the specimen. It was hypothesized that the ice would expand on freezing and contract as the temperature of the interface returned to the equilibrium conditions.
Technical Paper

Initial Results from Radiometer and Polarimetric Radar-based Icing Algorithms Compared to In-situ Data

2015-06-15
2015-01-2153
In early 2015, a field campaign was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. The purpose of the campaign is to test several prototype algorithms meant to detect the location and severity of in-flight icing (or icing aloft, as opposed to ground icing) within the terminal airspace. Terminal airspace for this project is currently defined as within 25 kilometers horizontal distance of the terminal, which in this instance is Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland. Two new and improved algorithms that utilize ground-based remote sensing instrumentation have been developed and were operated during the field campaign. The first is the ‘NASA Icing Remote Sensing System’, or NIRSS. The second algorithm is the ‘Radar Icing Algorithm’, or RadIA.
Technical Paper

Ice-Crystal Icing Accretion Studies at the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

2019-06-10
2019-01-1921
This paper describes an ice-crystal icing experiment conducted at the NASA Propulsion System Laboratory during June 2018. This test produced ice shape data on an airfoil for different test conditions similar to those inside the compressor region of a turbo-fan jet engine. Mixed-phase icing conditions were generated by partially freezing out a water spray using the relative humidity of flow as the primary parameter to control freeze-out. The paper presents the ice shape data and associated conditions which include pressure, velocity, temperature, humidity, total water content, melt ratio, and particle size distribution. The test featured a new instrument traversing system which allowed surveys of the flow and cloud. The purpose of this work was to provide experimental ice shape data and associated conditions to help develop and validate ice-crystal icing accretion models.
Technical Paper

Ice Particle Analysis of the Honeywell ALF502 Engine Booster

2015-06-15
2015-01-2131
A flow and ice particle trajectory analysis was performed for the booster of the Honeywell ALF502 engine. The analysis focused on two closely related conditions one of which produced an icing event and another which did not during testing of the ALF502 engine in the Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The flow analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn GlennHT flow solver and the particle analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D v3.63 ice accretion software. The inflow conditions for the two conditions were similar with the main differences being that the condition that produced the icing event was 6.8 K colder than the non-icing event case and the inflow ice water content (IWC) for the non-icing event case was 50% less than for the icing event case.
Technical Paper

Ice Accretion Measurements on an Airfoil and Wedge in Mixed-Phase Conditions

2015-06-15
2015-01-2116
This paper presents measurements of ice accretion shape and surface temperature from ice-crystal icing experiments conducted jointly by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. The data comes from experiments performed at NRC's Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac) in 2012. The measurements are intended to help develop models of the ice-crystal icing phenomenon associated with engine ice-crystal icing. Ice accretion tests were conducted using two different airfoil models (a NACA 0012 and wedge) at different velocities, temperatures, and pressures although only a limited set of permutations were tested. The wedge airfoil had several tests during which its surface was actively cooled. The ice accretion measurements included leading-edge thickness for both airfoils. The wedge and one case from the NACA 0012 model also included 2D cross-section profile shapes.
Technical Paper

Further Evaluation of Scaling Methods for Rotorcraft Icing

2011-06-13
2011-38-0083
The paper will present experimental results from two recent icing tests in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The first test, conducted in February 2009, was to evaluate the current recommended scaling methods for fixed wing on representative rotor airfoils at fixed angle of attack. For this test, scaling was based on the modified Ruff method with scale velocity determined by constant Weber number and water film Weber number. Models were un-swept NACA 0012 wing sections. The reference model had a chord of 91.4 cm and scale model had a chord of 35.6 cm. Reference tests were conducted with velocity of 100 kt (52 m/s), droplet medium volume diameter (MVD) 195 μm, and stagnation-point freezing fractions of 0.3 and 0.5 at angle of attack of 5° and 7°. It was shown that good ice shape scaling was achieved with constant Weber number for NACA 0012 airfoils with angle of attack up to 7°.
Technical Paper

Fundamental Ice Crystal Accretion Physics Studies

2011-06-13
2011-38-0018
Due to numerous engine power-loss events associated with high-altitude convective weather, ice accretion within an engine due to ice-crystal ingestion is being investigated. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada are starting to examine the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions. In November 2010, two weeks of testing occurred at the NRC Research Altitude Facility utilizing a single wedge-type airfoil designed to facilitate fundamental studies while retaining critical features of a compressor stator blade or guide vane. The airfoil was placed in the NRC cascade wind tunnel for both aerodynamic and icing tests. Aerodynamic testing showed excellent agreement compared with CFD data on the icing pressure surface and allowed calculation of heat transfer coefficients at various airfoil locations.
Technical Paper

Flow Field Predictions of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel

2011-06-13
2011-38-0074
To improve the understanding of the flow field within the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with three different tunnel configurations, three-dimensional Reynold-Average Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were performed using the Menter-SST turbulence model. The 2000 tunnel configuration was simulated in the settling chamber from the spray bars to the test section. The 2009 tunnel configuration was simulated with vertical struts and multiple Mod-1 air jets implemented using embedded velocity profiles. The 2012 tunnel configuration has a new heat exchanger which was modeled starting from the exit of the heat exchanger to the test section. The results described herein focus on the flow turbulence since this defines test section performance but also is used to improve uniformity of the Liquid Water Content (LWC).
Technical Paper

Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation of Glaze Ice Accretion on a Swept Wing

2019-06-10
2019-01-1987
Aerodynamic assessment of icing effects on swept wings is an important component of a larger effort to improve three-dimensional icing simulation capabilities. An understanding of ice-shape geometric fidelity and Reynolds and Mach number effects on iced-wing aerodynamics is needed to guide the development and validation of ice-accretion simulation tools. To this end, wind-tunnel testing was carried out for 8.9% and 13.3% scale semispan wing models based upon the Common Research Model airplane configuration. Various levels of geometric fidelity of an artificial ice shape representing a realistic glaze-ice accretion on a swept wing were investigated. The highest fidelity artificial ice shape reproduced all of the three-dimensional features associated with the glaze ice accretion. The lowest fidelity artificial ice shapes were simple, spanwise-varying horn ice geometries intended to represent the maximum ice thickness on the wing upper surface.
Technical Paper

Engine Icing Modeling and Simulation (Part I): Ice Crystal Accretion on Compression System Components and Modeling its Effects on Engine Performance

2011-06-13
2011-38-0025
During the past two decades the occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines under certain operating conditions has been reported. Numerous engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that were attributed to ice crystal ingestion such as degraded engine performance, engine roll back, compressor surge and stall, and even flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the engine and low pressure compression system, the air temperature increases and a portion of the ice melts allowing the ice-water mixture to stick to the metal surfaces of the engine core. The focus of this paper is on estimating the effects of ice accretion on the low pressure compressor, and quantifying its effects on the engine system throughout a notional flight trajectory. In this paper it was necessary to initially assume a temperature range in which engine icing would occur.
Technical Paper

Engine Icing Modeling and Simulation (Part 2): Performance Simulation of Engine Rollback Phenomena

2011-06-13
2011-38-0026
Ice buildup in the compressor section of a commercial aircraft gas turbine engine can cause a number of engine failures. One of these failure modes is known as engine rollback: an uncommanded decrease in thrust accompanied by a decrease in fan speed and an increase in turbine temperature. This paper describes the development of a model which simulates the system level impact of engine icing using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k). When an ice blockage is added to C-MAPSS40k, the control system responds in a manner similar to that of an actual engine, and, in cases with severe blockage, an engine rollback is observed. Using this capability to simulate engine rollback, a proof-of-concept detection scheme is developed and tested using only typical engine sensors.
Journal Article

Development of a Coupled Air and Particle Thermal Model for Engine Icing Test Facilities

2015-06-15
2015-01-2155
This paper describes a numerical model that simulates the thermal interaction between ice particles, water droplets, and the flowing air applicable during icing wind tunnel tests where there is significant phase-change of the cloud. It has been previously observed that test conditions, most notably temperature and humidity, change when the icing cloud is activated. It is hypothesized that the ice particles and water droplets thermally interact with the flowing air causing the air temperature and humidity to change by the time it reaches the test section. Unlike previous models where the air and particles are uncoupled, this model attempts to explain the observed changes in test conditions by coupling the conservation of mass and energy equations. The model is compared to measurements taken during wind tunnel tests simulating ice-crystal and mixed-phase icing that relate to ice accretions within turbofan engines.
Technical Paper

Application of Extended Messinger Models to Complex Geometries

2020-03-10
2020-01-0022
Since, ice accretion can significantly degrade the performance and the stability of an airborne vehicle, it is imperative to be able to model it accurately. While ice accretion studies have been performed on airplane wings and helicopter blades in abundance, there are few that attempt to model the process on more complex geometries such as fuselages. This paper proposes a methodology that extends an existing in-house Extended Messinger solver to complex geometries by introducing the capability to work with unstructured grids and carry out spatial surface streamwise marching. For the work presented here commercial solvers such as STAR-CCM+ and ANSYS Fluent are used for the flow field and droplet dispersed phase computations. The ice accretion is carried out using an in-house icing solver called GT-ICE. The predictions by GT-ICE are compared to available experimental data, or to predictions by other solvers such as LEWICE and STAR-CCM+.
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