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Technical Paper

SCR Architectures for Low N2O Emissions

2015-04-14
2015-01-1030
The high global warming potential of nitrous oxide (N2O) led to its inclusion in the list of regulated greenhouse gas (GHG) pollutants [1, 2]. The mitigation of N2O on aftertreatment catalysts was shown to be ineffective as its formation and decomposition temperatures do not overlap. Therefore, the root causes for N2O formation were investigated to enable the catalyst architectures and controls development for minimizing its formation. In a typical heavy-duty diesel exhaust aftertreatment system based on selective catalytic reduction of NOx by ammonia derived from urea (SCR), the main contributors to tailpipe N2O are expected to be the undesired reaction between NOx and NH3 over SCR catalyst and NH3 slip in to ammonia slip catalyst (ASC), part of which gets oxidized to N2O.
Technical Paper

New Insights into the Unique Operation of Small Pore Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst: Overlapping NH3 Desorption and Oxidation Characteristics for Minimizing Undesired Products

2014-04-01
2014-01-1542
An operational challenge associated with SCR catalysts is the NH3 slip control, particularly for commercial small pore Cu-zeolite formulations as a consequence of their significant ammonia storage capacity. The desorption of NH3 during increasing temperature transients is one example of this challenge. Ammonia slipping from SCR catalyst typically passes through a platinum based ammonia oxidation catalyst (AMOx), leading to the formation of the undesired byproducts NOx and N2O. We have discovered a distinctive characteristic, an overlapping NH3 desorption and oxidation, in a state-of-the-art Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst that can minimize NH3 slip during temperature transients encountered in real-world operation of a vehicle.
Journal Article

New Insights into Reaction Mechanism of Selective Catalytic Ammonia Oxidation Technology for Diesel Aftertreatment Applications

2011-04-12
2011-01-1314
Mitigation of ammonia slip from SCR system is critical to meeting the evolving NH₃ emission standards, while achieving maximum NOx conversion efficiency. Ammonia slip catalysts (ASC) are expected to balance high activity, required to oxidize ammonia across a broad range of operating conditions, with high selectivity of converting NH₃ to N₂, thus avoiding such undesirable byproducts as NOx or N₂O. In this work, new insights into the behavior of an advanced ammonia slip catalyst have been developed by using accelerated progressive catalyst aging as a tool for catalyst property interrogation. The overall behavior was deconstructed to several underlying functions, and referenced to an active but non-selective NH₃ oxidation function of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and to the highly selective but minimally active NH₃ oxidation function of an SCR catalyst.
Journal Article

Impact of Accelerated Hydrothermal Aging on Structure and Performance of Cu-SSZ-13 SCR Catalysts

2015-04-14
2015-01-1022
In this contribution, nuanced changes of a commercial Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst with hydrothermal aging, which have not been previously reported, as well as their corresponding impact on SCR functions, are described. In particular, a sample of Cu-SSZ-13 was progressively aged between 550 to 900°C and the changes of performance in NH3 storage, oxidation functionality and NOx conversion of the catalyst were measured after hydrothermal exposure at each temperature. The catalysts thus aged were further characterized by NH3-TPD, XRD and DRIFTS techniques for structural changes. Based on the corresponding performance and structural characteristics, three different regimes of hydrothermal aging were identified, and tentatively as assigned to “mild”, “severe” and “extreme” aging. Progressive hydrothermal aging up to 750°C decreased NOx conversion to a small degree, as well as NH3 storage and oxidation functions.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Spatially Resolved Performance of NOx Adsorber Catalysts

2009-04-20
2009-01-0275
A novel laboratory methodology has been developed and applied to evaluate performance of NOx Adsorber catalysts, based on the detailed analysis of micro-core samples obtained from various locations in a full-size catalyst. The technique includes a protocol for evaluating various aspects of NOx performance, as well as direct measurements of the amount of sulfur on the catalyst. This method was used to determine the NOx performance and distribution of sulfur loading on several engine aged catalysts. It showed the ability to differentiate poor NOx performance due to insufficient desulfation from that due to thermal degradation. This method further quantifies different forms of sulfur that are present on the catalyst. These forms of sulfur are distinguished by the temperature at which they are removed. In addition, the aspects of sulfur behavior that are important to this technique are discussed.
Journal Article

Axially Resolved Performance of Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalysts

2012-04-16
2012-01-1084
In this work, an alternative method is proposed and validated for quantifying the axial performance of a state-of-the-art Cu zeolite SCR catalyst. Catalyst cores of a standard length, with varying lengths of wash-coated regions were used to axially resolve the functional performance of the SCR catalyst. This proposed method was validated by quantifying the catalyst entrance and exit effects, as well as the effect of non-uniform wash-coat loading densities. This method is less susceptible to some of the complications highlighted in the previous studies, such as flow uniformity between channels, as well as radiative heating effects, since the product gases are sampled across the entire monolith cross-section rather than through a single catalyst channel. The specific catalyst functions quantified include: NO and NH₃ oxidation, NH₃ storage capacity, as well as NOx conversion efficiency.
Technical Paper

Advanced Catalyst Solutions for Hydrocarbon Emissions Control During Rich Operation of Lean NOx Trap Systems

2009-04-20
2009-01-0282
The operation of NOx Adsorber catalysts (NAC), also often referred to as Lean NOx Trap catalysts or NOx Storage-reduction catalysts, entails frequent periodic NOx regeneration events. These are accomplished by creating a net reducing, fuel-rich environment in the exhaust. The reduction of hydrocarbon emissions which occur during such fuel-rich events is challenging, due to the oxygen-deficient environment. In order to overcome this limitation, two possibilities exist: (i) oxygen can be stored during lean phase, to be used for hydrocarbon slip oxidation in the subsequent rich phase, or (ii) unreacted hydrocarbons can be trapped during the rich phase and oxidized during the following lean phase. In this work, two groups of catalytic solutions were developed and evaluated for hydrocarbon emission control based on these approaches: an Oxygen Storage Compound (OSC) based catalyst and zeolite-based hydrocarbon trap catalyst.
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