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Technical Paper

Ultrasonic Spot Welding of Galvanized Mild Steel to Magnesium AZ31B

2012-04-16
2012-01-0474
Ultrasonic spot welding (USW) is a promising joining method for magnesium to steel to overcome the difficulties of fusion welding for these two materials with significant differences in melting temperatures. In a previous paper, the results of ultrasonic spot welding of magnesium to steel, with sonotrode engaged Mg piece, was presented. In this study, same material combination (0.8-mm-thick galvanized mild steel and 1.6-mm Mg AZ31B-H24) was used, but with sonotrode engaging steel piece. Various welding time, from 0.4 to 2.0 sec, were applied. Tensile lap-shear test, optical metallography, and scanning electron micrography were conducted for joint strength measurement and microstructural evaluation. The joint strength reached over 4.2 kN at 1.8 sec welding time. Mg-Zn eutectic was formed at the interface, indicating the interfacial temperature over 344°C. The study demonstrated USW to be a viable process for potential manufacturing of mixed-metal joints.
Journal Article

Ultrasonic Spot Welding of AZ31B to Galvanized Mild Steel

2010-04-12
2010-01-0975
Ultrasonic spot welds were made between sheets of 0.8-mm-thick hot-dip-galvanized mild steel and 1.6-mm-thick AZ31B-H24. Lap-shear strengths of 3.0-4.2 kN were achieved with weld times of 0.3-1.2 s. Failure to achieve strong bonding of joints where the Zn coating was removed from the steel surface indicate that Zn is essential to the bonding mechanism. Microstructure characterization and microchemical analysis indicated temperatures at the AZ31-steel interfaces reached at least 344°C in less than 0.3 s. The elevated temperature conditions promoted annealing of the AZ31-H24 metal and chemical reactions between it and the Zn coating.
Technical Paper

Tribological Characteristics of Electrolytic Coatings for Aluminum Engine Cylinder Lining Applications

2002-03-04
2002-01-0490
The friction and wear characteristics of three commercially-available, electrolytic coatings for aluminum engine cylinder bores were compared to those of cast iron liners. A Ni/SiC electrocomposite, a hard anodized treatment, and a Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated. ASTM standard test method G133-95, non-firing test method, for linearly reciprocating sliding wear was modified to use segments of piston rings and cylinder liners. Tests were conducted using Mr. Goodwrench™ 5W30 as a lubricant at room temperature. The normal force was 150N, the reciprocating frequency was 15Hz, the stroke length was 8mm, and the test duration was 60 minutes. Kinetic friction coefficients ranged from 0.1 to 0.22, typical of boundary lubrication. The Ni/SiC and cast iron samples exhibited the lowest friction. The wear resistance of the Ni/SiC coating was superior to that of cast iron.
Technical Paper

The Prestrain Effect on the Sheared Edge Flangeability of Dual Phase 780 Steels

2012-04-16
2012-01-0533
Edge flanging represents one of the forming modes employed in multistage forming, and advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are more prone to edge cracking during sheared edge flanging than the conventional high strength steels (HSS) and mild steels. The performance of the sheared edge in flanging operation depends on the remaining ductility of the material in the sheared edge after the work hardening (WH) and damage produced by blanking and subsequent forming operations. Therefore, it is important to analyze the effect of work hardening produced by blanking and subsequent forming operations prior to edge flanging on the edge flanging performance. In this study, the effect of different forming operation sequences prior to edge flanging on the edge flanging performance was analyzed for a dual phase 780 steel.
Technical Paper

Studies on Edge Strain Hardening Produced by Trimming Operations

2013-04-08
2013-01-1774
Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are widely used in the automotive industry for various applications especially for structural and safety parts. One of the concerns for AHSS in stamping operations is edge fracture originating from sheared blanked edges. This type of failure cannot be predicted by computer simulations using the conventional forming limit as the failure criterion. The reason for this is that edge damage produced by the blanking operation is not incorporated into the computer models to properly simulate the material edge formability. This study presents a method to evaluate edge damage in terms of the residual stress at the sheared edge produced by the blanking operation. The method uses the level and distribution of edge strain hardening (ESH) through the material thickness as an index to characterize the edge damage caused by the shearing operation.
Technical Paper

Steel Processing Effects on Impact Deformation of UltraLight Steel Auto Body

2001-03-05
2001-01-1056
The objective of the research presented in this paper was to assess the influence of stamping process on crash response of UltraLight Steel Auto Body (ULSAB) [1] vehicle. Considered forming effects included thickness variations and plastic strain hardening imparted in the part forming process. The as-formed thickness and plastic strain for front crash parts were used as input data for vehicle crash analysis. Differences in structural performance between crash models with and without forming data were analyzed in order to determine the effects and feasibility of integration of forming processes and crash models.
Technical Paper

Residual Stress Distribution in a Hydroformed Advanced High Strength Steel Component: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Finite Element Simulations

2018-04-03
2018-01-0803
Today’s automotive industry is witnessing increasing applications of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) combined with innovative manufacturing techniques to satisfy fuel economy requirements of stringent environmental regulations. The integration of AHSS in novel automotive structure design has introduced huge advantages in mass reduction while maintaining their structural performances, yet several concerns have been raised for this relatively new family of steels. One of those concerns is their potentially high springback after forming, which can lead to geometrical deviation of the final product from its designed geometry and cause difficulties during assembly. From the perspective of accurate prediction, control and compensation of springback, further understanding on the effect of residual stress in AHSS parts is urged. In this work, the residual stress distribution in a 980GEN3 steel part after hydroforming is investigated via experimental and numerical approaches.
Technical Paper

Replacing Press Hardenable Steel with 980 MPa Generation 3 Steel for Automotive Pillars

2018-04-03
2018-01-0117
Press hardenable ultra high strength steel (UHSS) is commonly used for automotive components to meet crash requirements with minimal mass addition to the vehicle. Press hardenable steel (PHS) is capable of forming complex geometries with deep sections since the forming takes place at elevated temperatures up to 900 degrees Celsius (in the Austenitic phase). This forming process is known as hot-stamping. The most commonly used PHS grade is often referred to as PHS1500. After hot-stamping, it is typically required to have a yield strength greater than 950 MPa and a tensile strength greater than 1300 MPa. Most automotive design and material engineers are familiar with PHS, the hot-stamping process, and their capabilities. What is less known is the capability of 3rd Generation advanced high strength steels (AHSS) which are cold stamped, also capable of forming complex geometry, and are now in the process of, or have recently completed, qualification at most automotive manufacturers.
Technical Paper

Recycling of New Generation Vehicles

1999-03-01
1999-01-0673
The composition of New Generation Vehicles under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program is anticipated to be significantly different from the typical automobile available now on the market. A spreadsheet cost model of the automobile recycling infrastructure was developed to estimate the potential effects of New Generation Vehicles on the future economic viability of the recycling industry. On the one hand, the higher value of aluminum is likely to cause a positive impact on the three distinct players in the recycling industry, if some technical issues are overcome. On the other hand, the economic viability of the current recycling industry may be diminished by the substitution of composites.
Technical Paper

Predictive Model and Methodology for Heat Treatment Distortion

1998-08-11
982112
The heat treatment of steel parts is an essential step in the manufacturing of high-performance components for a variety of commercial and military products. Distortion in the size and shape of parts resulting from the heat treatment process is a pervasive manufacturing problem that causes higher finishing costs, excessive scrap and rework, long delivery times, and negative environmental impact. To date, techniques that have been developed to reduce or eliminate heat treatment distortion are largely based on experience and have been limited to trial and error. This presentation describes the philosophy and results of an ongoing collaborative project to develop a methodology and computer simulation capability to predict ferrous alloy component response (distortion, residual stress, and microstructure) to industrial heat treatment processes for automotive, truck, bearing, and aerospace applications.
Journal Article

Optimized Design Solutions for Roof Strength Using Advanced High Strength Steels

2010-04-12
2010-01-0214
In August 2005, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) proposed to increase the roof strength requirement under Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 216 from 1.5 to 2.5 times unloaded vehicle weight (UVW). To meet the new requirement with a minimum impact on vehicle weight and cost, the automotive community is working actively to develop improved roof architectures using advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials such as structural foam. The objective of this study is to develop an optimized steel-only solution with low material and part-manufacturing costs. Since the new regulation will present a particular challenge to the roof architectures of large vans, pickup trucks and SUVs due to their large mass and size, a validated roof crush model on a B-Pillar-less light truck is utilized in this study.
Technical Paper

Optimal Production Trimming Process for AHSS Sheared Edge Stretchability Improvement

2014-04-01
2014-01-0994
Edge fracture is one of the major issues for stamping Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS). Recent studies have showed this type of fracture is greatly affected by an improper trimming process. The current production trimming process used for the conventional mild steels has not been modified for AHSS trimming. In addition to the high-energy requirement, the current mechanical trimming process would generate a rough edge (burr) with microcracks in trimmed edges for AHSS trimming, which could serve as the crack initiation during forming. The purpose of this study is to develop a proper production trimming process for AHSS and elucidate the effect of the trimmed edge conditions on edge fracture. A straight edge shearing device with the capability of adjusting the shearing variables is used in this study.
Technical Paper

Next Generation Casting Process Models - Predicting Porosity and Microstructure

1998-08-11
982113
The computer-aided-design and analysis of a robust casting process requires the optimization of both mold filling and solidification. A number of commercial casting codes are available for modeling the fluid flow during mold filling and the heat transfer during solidification. The next generation casting process models will build on present capabilities to allow the prediction of microporosity and other defects and microstructure. This paper will discuss the issues involved in the development of next generation casting process models and present results from a computer model for microporosity prediction that is based on first principles, and will take into account alloy composition, alloy microstructure, the initial hydrogen content of the liquid alloy, and the resistance to inter-dendritic fluid flow to feed shrinkage.
Journal Article

Neutron Diffraction Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Irons

2011-04-12
2011-01-0033
Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool that can be used to identify the phases present and to measure the spacing of the atomic planes in a material. Thus, the residual stresses can be determined within a component and/or the phases present. New intercritically austempered irons rely on the unique properties of the austenite phase present in their microstructures. If these materials are to see widespread use, methods to verify the quality (behavior consistency) of these materials and to provide guidance for further optimization will be needed. Neutron diffraction studies were performed at the second generation neutron residual stress facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a variety of intercritically austempered irons. For similar materials, such as TRIP steels, the strengthening mechanism involves the transformation of metastable austenite to martensite during deformation.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Strain Rate Effects in Automotive Impact

2003-03-03
2003-01-1383
This paper deals with the effects of various approaches for modeling of strain rate effects for mild and high strength steels (HSS) on impact simulations. The material modeling is discussed in the context of the finite element method (FEM) modeling of progressive crush of energy absorbing automotive components. The characteristics of piecewise linear plasticity strain rate dependent material model are analyzed and various submodels for modeling of impact response of steel structures are investigated. The paper reports on the ranges of strains and strain rates that are calculated in typical FEM models for tube crush and their dependence on the material modeling approaches employed. The models are compared to the experimental results from drop tower tests.
Technical Paper

Mode I Fracture Testing of Adhesively Bonded Joints

1999-03-01
1999-01-1253
Several standard methods exist for testing composites, metals and plastics in Mode I fracture. However, these standard test methods have limitations that disqualify them as candidates for testing certain automotive materials. In order to conduct successful fracture toughness tests with these automotive materials, a modified double cantilever beam testing geometry and associated new procedure have been developed. Both the test procedure and the data analysis have been fully documented in a draft standard. Representative SRIM composite, e-coat steel and epoxy were selected to develop and validate the testing procedure.
Technical Paper

Microstructures and Failure Mechanisms of Spot Friction Welds in Lap-Shear Specimens of Aluminum 5754 Sheets

2005-04-11
2005-01-1256
Microstructures and failure mechanisms of spot friction welds (SFW) in aluminum 5754 lap-shear specimens were investigated. In order to study the effect of tool geometry on the joint strength of spot friction welds, a concave tool and a flat tool were used. In order to understand the effect of tool penetration depth on the joint strength, spot friction welds were prepared with two different penetration depths for each tool. The results indicated that the concave tool produced slightly higher joint strength than the flat tool. The joint strength did not change for the two depths for the flat tool whereas the joint strength slightly increases as the penetration depth increases for the concave tool. The experimental results show that the failure mechanism is necking and shearing for the spot friction welds made by both tools. The failure was initiated and fractured through the upper sheet under the shoulder indentation near the crack tip.
Technical Paper

Metal Compression Forming - A New Process for Structural Aluminum Alloy Castings

1998-08-11
982107
Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process. The paper describes the casting process development involved in the production of an aluminum A357 alloy motor mount bracket, including the use of a filling and solidification model to design the gating and determine process parameters. Tensile properties of the component are presented and correlated with those of forged components.
Technical Paper

Material Modeling Effects on Impact Deformation of Ultralight Steel Auto Body

2000-10-03
2000-01-2715
This paper describes the results of the computational analysis of UltraLight Steel Auto Body (ULSAB) crash simulations that were performed using advanced material modeling techniques. The effects of strain-rate sensitivity on a high strength steel intensive vehicle was analyzed. Frontal and frontal offset crash scenarios were used in a finite element parametric study of the ULSAB body structure. Comparisons are made between the crash results using the piece-wise-linear isotropic plasticity strain-rate dependent material model, and the isotropic plasticity material model based on quasi-static properties. The simulation results show the importance of advanced material modeling techniques for vehicle crash simulations due to strain-rate sensitivity and rapid hardening characteristics of advanced high strength steels.
Technical Paper

Low Density and Temperature Tolerant Alloys for Automotive Applications

2017-03-28
2017-01-1666
Aluminum alloys containing cerium have excellent castability and retain a substantial fraction of their room temperature strength at temperatures of 200°C and above. High temperature strength is maintained through a thermodynamically trapped, high surface energy intermetallic. Dynamic load partitioning between the aluminum and the intermetallic increases mechanical response. Complex castings have been produced in both permanent mold and sand castings. This versatile alloy system, using an abundant and inexpensive co-product of rare earth mining, is suitable for parts that need to maintain good properties when exposed to temperatures between 200 and 315°C.
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