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Journal Article

Tomographic Particle-Image Velocimetry Analysis of In-Cylinder Flows

2015-06-01
2015-01-9042
New combustion processes require an understanding of the highly three-dimensional flow field to effectively decrease fuel consumption and pollutant emission. Due to the complex spatial character of the flow the knowledge of the development of the flow in an extended volume is necessary. Previous investigations were able to visualize the discrete three-dimensional flow field through multi-plane stereoscopic PIV. In this study, cycle resolved tomographic particle-image velocimetry measurement have been performed to obtain a fully resolved representation of the three-dimensional flow structures at each instant. The analysis is based on the measurements at 80°, 160°, and 240° after top dead center(atdc) such that the velocity distributions at the intake, the end of the intake, and the compression stroke at an engine speed of 1,500 rpm are discussed in detail.
Technical Paper

Tailor-Made Fuels: The Potential of Oxygen Content in Fuels for Advanced Diesel Combustion Systems

2009-11-02
2009-01-2765
Fuels derived from biomass will most likely contain oxygen due to the high amount of hydrogen needed to remove oxygen in the production process. Today, alcohol fuels (e. g. ethanol) are well understood for spark ignition engines. The Institute for Combustion Engines at RWTH Aachen University carried out a fuel investigation program to explore the potential of alcohol fuels as candidates for future compression ignition engines to reduce engine-out emissions while maintaining engine efficiency and an acceptable noise level. The soot formation and oxidation process when using alcohol fuels in diesel engines is not yet sufficiently understood. Depending on the chain length, alcohol fuels vary in cetane number and boiling temperature. Decanol possesses a diesel-like cetane number and a boiling point in the range of the diesel boiling curve. Thus, decanol was selected as an alcohol representative to investigate the influence of the oxygen content of an alcohol on the combustion performance.
Technical Paper

Scalable Mean Value Modeling for Real-Time Engine Simulations with Improved Consistency and Adaptability

2019-04-02
2019-01-0195
This article discusses highly flexible and accurate physics-based mean value modeling (MVM) for internal combustion engines and its wide applicability towards virtual vehicle calibration. The requirement to fulfill the challenging Real Driving Emissions (RDE) standards has significantly increased the demand for precise engine models, especially models regarding pollutant emissions and fuel economy. This has led to a large increase in effort required for precise engine modeling and robust model calibration. Two best-practice engine modeling approaches will be introduced here to satisfy these requirements. These are the exclusive MVM approach, and a combination of MVM and a Design of Experiments (DOE) model for heterogeneous multi-domain engine systems.
Technical Paper

Reduced Chemical Mechanism for the Calculation of Ethanol / Air Flame Speeds

2015-09-06
2015-24-2492
Ethanol currently remains the leading biofuel in the transportation sector, with special focus on spark ignition engines, as a pure as well as a blend component. In order to provide reliable numerical simulations of gasoline combustion processes under the influence of ethanol for modern engine research, it is mandatory to develop well validated detailed kinetic combustion models. One key parameter for the numerical simulation is the laminar burning velocity. Under the aspect of minimizing the general simulation effort for burning velocities, well-validated models have to be reduced. As a base kinetic mechanism for the reduction and optimisation process with respect to burning velocity calculations, a detailed model presented by Zhao et al. (Int. J. Chem. Kin. 40 (1) (2007) 1-18) is chosen. The model has been extensively validated against shock tube, rapid compression machine and burning velocity data. The detailed model consists of 55 species and 290 reactions.
Technical Paper

Real-Time Modeling of a 48V P0 Mild Hybrid Vehicle with Electric Compressor for Model Predictive Control

2019-04-02
2019-01-0350
In order to reduce pollutant and CO2 emissions and fulfill future legislative requirements, powertrain electrification is one of the key technologies. In this context, especially 48V technologies offer an attractive cost to CO2 reduction ratio. 48V mild hybrid powertrains greatly benefit from additional electric intake air compression (E-Charging) and direct torque assist by an electric machine (E-Boosting). Both systems significantly improve the transient engine behavior while reducing the low end torque drawbacks of extreme downsizing and downspeeding. Since E-Charging and E-Boosting have different characteristics concerning transient torque response and energy efficiency, application of model predictive control (MPC) is a particularly suitable method to improve the operating strategy of these functions. MPC requires fast running real-time capable models that are challenging to develop for systems with pronounced nonlinearities.
Technical Paper

Partially Premixed Combustion of Gasoline Type Fuels Using Larger Size Nozzle and Higher Compression Ratio in a Diesel Engine

2013-10-14
2013-01-2539
If fuels that are more resistant to auto-ignition are injected near TDC in compression ignition engines, they ignite much later than diesel fuel and combustion occurs when the fuel and air have had more chance to mix. This helps to reduce NOX and smoke emissions at much lower injection pressures compared to a diesel fuel. However, PPCI (Partially Premixed Compression Ignition) operation also leads to higher CO and HC at low loads and higher heat release rates at high loads. These problems can be significantly alleviated by managing the mixing through injector design (e.g. nozzle size and centreline spray angle) and changing CR (Compression Ratio). This work describes results of running a single-cylinder diesel engine on fuel blends by using three different nozzle design (nozzle size: 0.13 mm and 0.17 mm, centreline spray angle: 153° and 120°) and two different CRs (15.9:1 and 18:1).
Journal Article

Optimization of Diesel Combustion and Emissions with Tailor-Made Fuels from Biomass

2013-09-08
2013-24-0059
In order to thoroughly investigate and improve the path from biofuel production to combustion, the Cluster of Excellence “Tailor-Made Fuels from Biomass” was installed at RWTH Aachen University in 2007. Since then, a variety of fuel candidates have been investigated. In particular, 2-methyl tetrahydrofurane (2-MTHF) has shown excellent performance w.r.t. the particulate (PM) / NOx trade-off [1]. Unfortunately, the long ignition delay results in increased HC-, CO- and noise emissions. To overcome this problem, the addition of di-n-butylether (DNBE, CN ∼ 100) to 2-MTHF was analyzed. By blending these two in different volumetric shares, the effects of the different mixture formation and combustion characteristics, especially on the HC-, CO- and noise emissions, have been carefully analyzed. In addition, the overall emission performance has been compared to EN590 diesel.
Technical Paper

Optimised Neat Ethanol Engine with Stratified Combustion at Part-load; Particle Emissions, Efficiency and Performance

2013-04-08
2013-01-0254
A regular flex-fuel engine can operate on any blend of fuel between pure gasoline and E85. Flex-fuel engines have relatively low efficiency on E85 because the hardware is optimized for gasoline. If instead the engine is optimized for neat ethanol, the efficiency may be much higher, as demonstrated in this paper. The studied two-liter engine was modified with a much higher compression ratio than suitable for gasoline, two-stage turbocharging and direct injection with piezo-actuated outwards-opening injectors, a stratified combustion system and custom in-house control system. The research engine exhibited a wide-open throttle performance similar to that of a naturally aspirated v8, while offering a part-load efficiency comparable to a state-of-the-art two-liter naturally aspirated engine. NOx will be handled by a lean NOx trap. Combustion characteristics were compared between gasoline and neat ethanol.
Technical Paper

Optical Investigation of Biofuel Effects on NO and PAH Formation in Diesel-Like Jets

2015-09-06
2015-24-2485
In order to reduce engine out CO2 emissions it is a main subject to find new alternative fuels out of renewable sources. For this reason in this paper a blend out of 1-octanol and di-n-butylether and pure di-n-butylether are investigated in comparison to n-heptane as diesel-like fuel. The alternative fuels have a different combustion behavior particularly concerning important combustion parameters like ignition delay and mixture formation. Especially the formation of pollutants like nitrogen oxides in the combustion of alternative fuels is of global interest. The knowledge of the combustion behavior is important to design new engine geometries or implement a new calibration of the engine. In previous measurements in a single cylinder engine it was found out that both alternative fuels form nearly no soot emissions. For this reason now NOx is investigated optically to avoid the traditional soot NOx trade-off in diesel combustion.
Technical Paper

Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Laminar Burning Velocities of iso-Octane, Ethanol and n-Butanol

2009-11-02
2009-01-2784
Fuels containing oxygenates have become more and more important for spark ignition engines in recent years. Oxygenates are either used as an octane booster or as a biofuel component for fulfilling legislative regulations. Ethanol has been well established for blend rates up to 10%volliq. On the other hand butanol has been introduced as an alternative biofuel component. The effect of the laminar burning velocity of different fuel components on modern engine development is investigated by conducting experiments under high initial pressure and temperature. Initial conditions in this work are a pressure of p = 10 bar and a temperature of T = 373 K. Experiments were done at different fuel - air ratios between 0.8 and 1.3. Test fuels were the pure fuel components iso-octane, ethanol and n-butanol. Different chemical kinetic mechanisms for iso-octane, ethanol and n-butanol from literature are used to calculate laminar burning velocities.
Technical Paper

Numerical Investigation of Laminar Burning Velocities of High Octane Fuel Blends Containing Ethanol

2009-04-20
2009-01-0935
Recently, fuels containing ethanol have become more and more important for spark ignition engines. Fuels with up to 10 vol.-% ethanol can be used in most spark ignition engines without technical modification. These fuels have been introduced in many countries already. Alternatively, for fuels with higher amounts of ethanol so called flex fuel vehicles (FFV) exist. One of the most important quantities characterizing a fuel is the laminar burning velocity. To account for the new fuels with respect to engine design, reliable data need to be existent. Especially for engine simulations, various combustion models have been introduced which rely on the laminar burning velocity as the physical quantity describing the progress of chemical reactions, diffusion, and heat conduction. However, there is very few data available in the literature for fuels containing ethanol, especially at high pressures.
Journal Article

Numerical Investigation of Direct Gas Injection in an Optical Internal Combustion Engine

2018-04-03
2018-01-0171
Direct injection (DI) of compressed natural gas (CNG) is a promising technology to increase the indicated thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines (ICE) while reducing exhaust emissions and using a relatively low-cost fuel. However, design and analysis of DI-CNG engines are challenging because supersonic gas jet emerging from the DI injector results in a very complex in-cylinder flow field containing shocks and discontinuities affecting the fuel-air mixing. In this article, numerical simulations are used supported by validation to investigate the direct gas injection and its influence on the flow field and mixing in an optically accessible ICE. The simulation approach involves computation of the in-nozzle flow with highly accurate Large-Eddy Simulations, which are then used to obtain a mapped boundary condition. The boundary condition is applied in Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of the engine to investigate the in-cylinder velocity and mixing fields.
Technical Paper

Lower Emissions in Commercial Diesel Engines through Waste Heat Recovery

2016-09-27
2016-01-8084
In order to comply with demanding Greenhous Gas (GHG) standards, future automotive engines employ advanced engine technologies including waste heat recovery (WHR) systems. A waste heat recovery system converts part of engine wasted exergies to useful work which can be fed back to the engine. Utilizing this additional output power leads to lower specific fuel consumption and CO2 emission when the total output power equals the original engine output power. Engine calibration strategies for reductions in specific fuel consumption typically results in a natural increase of NOx emissions. The utilization of waste heat recovery systems provides a pathway which gives both reduction in emissions and reduction in specific fuel consumption. According to DOE (Department of Energy), US heavy-duty truck engines’ technology need to be upgraded towards higher brake thermal efficiencies (BTE). DOE target is BTE>55% for Class-8 heavy-duty vehicles in the United States.
Technical Paper

Lightweight Automobiles ALLIANCE Project: First Results of Environmental and Economic Assessment from a Life-Cycle Perspective

2018-05-30
2018-37-0027
In the last years the research activities in the field of lightweighting have been advancing rapidly. The introduction of innovative materials and manufacturing technologies has allowed significant weight reduction. Despite this, novel technologies and materials have not reached a wide distribution. The reasons for this are mainly high production costs and environmental impacts of manufacturing that do not compensate benefits during operation. The paper deals with the AffordabLe LIghtweight Automobiles AlliaNCE (ALLIANCE) project which has the goal of developing novel advanced automotive materials and production technologies, aiming at an average 25% weight reduction over 100 k units/year, at costs of <3 €/kg. The article is focussed on Work Package 1 (WP1) of the project, aimed at estimating the full attributes of innovative design solutions by assessing costs, energy demand and GWP over the entire vehicle Life Cycle (LC).
Journal Article

Laser-Induced Incandescence Measurements of Tailor-Made Fuels in an Optical Single-Cylinder Diesel Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-0711
The influence of two oxygenated tailor-made fuels on soot formation and oxidation in an optical single cylinder research diesel engine has been studied. For the investigation a planar laser-induced incandescence (PLII) measurement technique was applied to the engine in order to detect and evaluate the planar soot distribution for the two bio fuels within a laser light sheet. Furthermore the OH* chemiluminescence and broad band soot luminosity was visualized by high speed imaging to compare the ignition and combustion behavior of tested fuels: Two C8 oxygenates, di-n-butylether (DNBE) and 1-octanol. Both fuels have the same molecular formula but differ in their molecular structure. DNBE ignites fast and burns mostly diffusive while 1-octanol has a low cetane number and therefore it has a longer ignition delay but a more homogeneous mixture at time of ignition. The two bio fuels were finally compared to conventional diesel fuel.
Technical Paper

Large-Eddy Simulation Study on Unsteady Effects in a Statistically Stationary SI Engine Port Flow

2015-04-14
2015-01-0373
Although spark-ignited engines have a considerable development history, the relevant flow physics and geometry design implications are still not fully understood. One reason is the lack of experimental and numerical methods with sufficiently high resolution or capabilities of capturing stochastic phenomena which could be used as part of the development cycle. More recently, Large-Eddy simulation (LES) has been identified as a promising technique to establish a better understanding of in-cylinder flow variations. However, simulations of engine configurations are challenging due to resolution as well as modeling requirements and computational cost for these unsteady multi-physics problems. LES on full engine geometries can even be prohibitively expensive. For this reason, the size of the computational LES domain is here reduced to the region of physical interest and boundary conditions are obtained from a RANS simulation of the whole experimental flow domain.
Technical Paper

Laminar Burning Velocity of Market Type Gasoline Surrogates as a Performance Indicator in Internal Combustion Engines

2018-09-10
2018-01-1667
The laminar burning velocity is an important parameter in various combustion models for engine simulations. With respect to computational time for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and full system engine simulations, the calculation of laminar burning velocities using a detailed chemical mechanism can be replaced by incorporation of approximation formulas, based on rate-ratio asymptotics. In the present study, a work flow is developed to analyze the engine efficiency performance of spark ignition engines with respect to the laminar burning velocity as a fundamental fuel property. Firstly, methane is used as a fuel to assess practicability of the approach. The procedure is subsequently adopted for market type gasoline surrogates, RON95 and RON100. Detailed chemistry calculations are carried out for the three target fuels using existing state of the art mechanisms, the Aramco [Zhou et al., Proc. Combust. Inst., pp. 403-411, 2017] and the ITV RWTH mechanism [Cai et al., Combust.
Technical Paper

Laminar Burning Velocities of Dimethyl Ether, n-Heptane and iso-Octane at High Pressure

2009-11-02
2009-01-2656
Oxygenates, such as methanol or ethanol, are frequently used as blending components in standard gasoline. One oxygenate, dimethyl ether (DME), is also used as a fuel component in some regions of the world, for example in Asia. In addition, patent reviews show the potential of DME as a blending component in liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or mixed with propane. The laminar burning velocity is one key parameter for the numerical simulation of gasoline engine combustion processes. Therefore, it is of great interest for modern engine development to understand the effect of oxygenates on the laminar burning velocity. The experimental results have been conducted under engine-like conditions with elevated initial pressures of up to 20 bar and initial temperatures of 373 K. Experiments were done at equivalence ratios between 0.8 and 1.3. The experimental setup consists of a spherical closed pressurized combustion vessel with optical access.
Technical Paper

Investigation of Mixture Formation in Diesel Sprays under Quiescent Conditions using Raman, Mie and LIF Diagnostics

2008-04-14
2008-01-0945
Mixture formation plays an important role for combustion and pollution formation in Diesel sprays. In particular air/fuel ratio (AFR) and temperature of the mixture short before ignition are crucial for these processes. Thus, these two quantities were measured quantitatively using 1-d spontaneous Raman scattering in this work. In addition, 1-d and 2-d Mie scattering was applied to visualize the distribution of the fuel droplets. 1-d and 2-d laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was also used to measure oxygen and fuel in a qualitative way in this work. The common rail Diesel injector was installed in a combustion vessel, in order to provide nearly quiescent high-pressure and high-temperature conditions. N-decane was used as the fuel, because it is a commonly used model fuel for standard Diesel fuel. It was doped with three different tracers with different boiling points in consecutive experiments in the case of 2-d LIF measurements.
Journal Article

Influence of In-Cylinder Air Flow on Spray Propagation

2017-06-29
2017-01-9280
The influence of in-cylinder flow on the propagation of 2-Butanone and Ethanol sprays is studied. To solely evaluate the interaction of air flow and fuel, high-speed Mie-Scattering Imaging of hollow cone sprays is conducted both in a single-cylinder optical engine with tumble movement and in a pressure vessel with negligible air flow. The direct comparison reveals an improved spray propagation of 2-Butanone due to the engine’s air flow. The lower viscosity of 2-Butanone causes an enhanced jet breakup compared to Ethanol such that the spray consists of more and smaller droplets. Small droplets possess a lower momentum, which allows the droplets to be more efficiently transported by the air flow. Consequently, the fuel distribution across the cylinder is enhanced. As the liquid fuel is distributed to a larger volume, improved convection accelerates evaporation.
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