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Technical Paper

Technical Advantages of Urea SCR for Light-Duty and Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Applications

2004-03-08
2004-01-1292
The 2007 emission standards for both light-duty and heavy-duty diesel vehicles remain a challenge. A level of about 90% NOx conversion is required to meet the standards. Technologies that have the most potential to achieve very high NOx conversion at low temperatures of diesel exhaust are lean NOx traps (LNTs) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx using aqueous urea, typically known as Urea SCR. The LNT has the advantage of requiring no new infrastructure, and does not pose any new customer compliance issues. However, Urea SCR has high and durable NOx conversion in a wider temperature window, a lower equivalent fuel penalty, and lower system cost. On a technical basis, Urea SCR has the best chance of meeting the 2007 NOx targets. This paper reviews the results of some demonstration programs for both light-and heavy-duty applications.
Technical Paper

Diesel Catalyst Aging using a FOCAS® HGTR, a Diesel Burner System, to Simulate Engine-Based Aging

2010-04-12
2010-01-1218
The classical approach to prepare engine exhaust emissions control systems for evaluation and certification is to condition the fresh parts by aging the systems on an engine/dynamometer aging stand. For diesel systems this can be a very lengthy process since the estimated service life of the emissions control systems can be several hundred thousand miles. Thus full useful life aging can take thousands of engine bench aging hours, even at elevated temperatures, making aging a considerable cost and time investment. Compared to gasoline engines, diesel engines operate with very low exhaust gas temperatures. One of the major sources of catalyst deactivation is exposure to high temperature [ 1 ].
Technical Paper

Cold Start HD FTP Test Results on Multi-Cylinder Opposed-Piston Engine Demonstrating Rapid Exhaust Enthalpy Rise to Achieve Ultra Low NOx

2018-04-03
2018-01-1378
The 2010 emission standards for heavy-duty diesel engines in the U.S. have established a limit for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions of 0.20 g/bhp-hr., a 90% reduction from the previous emission standards. However, it has been projected that even when the entire on-road fleet of heavy-duty vehicles operating in California is compliant with the 2010 emission standards, the upcoming National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) requirement for ambient particulate matter and ozone will not be achieved in California without further significant reductions in NOx emissions from the heavy-duty vehicle fleet. Given this, there is potential of further reduction in NOx emissions limit standards for heavy duty engines in the US. Recently there have been extensive studies and publications focusing on ultra-low NOx after treatment technologies that help achieve up to 0.02g/bhp-hr. at tailpipe [1].
Journal Article

Achieving Ultra Low NOX Emissions Levels with a 2017 Heavy-Duty On-Highway TC Diesel Engine - Comparison of Advanced Technology Approaches

2017-03-28
2017-01-0956
The 2010 emissions standards for heavy-duty engines have established a limit of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions of 0.20 g/bhp-hr. However, the California Air Resource Board (ARB) projects that even when the entire on-road fleet of heavy-duty vehicles operating in California is compliant with 2010 emission standards, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) requirement for ambient particulate matter (PM) and Ozone will not be achieved without further reduction in NOX emissions. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) funded a research program to explore the feasibility of achieving 0.02 g/bhp-hr NOX emissions.
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