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Technical Paper

The Development of Fluid for Small-Sized and Light Weight Viscous Coupling

1998-05-04
981446
For viscous couplings(VCs) as a driving force transmission system of vehicles, requirement of torque characteristics has been getting very stringent. Because the torque characteristics significantly affect four wheel drive vehicles' abilities such as traction performance and driving stability. Furthermore, the recent concerns on high fuel economy, low pollution and low cost require that design of VCs should be increasingly compact, light weighted and excellent in transmitted torque's stability. It is an easy way to increase viscosity of viscous coupling fluids(VCFs) for the compact design of the VC. But it might cause increase in heat load and wear of plates which resulted in degradation of the VCF. The degradation affects VCF's viscosity and impairs stability in torque transmission. Therefore it is indispensable to develop high viscosity VCF which is excellent in long-term viscosity's stability.
Technical Paper

New Conceptual Lead Free Overlays Consisted of Solid Lubricant for Internal Combustion Engine Bearings

2003-03-03
2003-01-0244
Two types of new conceptual lead free overlays are developed for automotive internal combustion(IC) engine bearings. The overlays are consisted of molybdenum disulfide(MoS2) and polyamideimide(PAI) resin for binding. One of the overlays is suitable for diesel engines with higher unit load and the other overlay is suitable for gasoline engines with higher sliding velocity. Both overlays indicate good corrosion resistance and wear resistance comparing with conventional lead base overlay. Moreover, higher fatigue resistance is obtained in combination with high performance lead free bearing alloy. These new bearings have the potential to become alternative materials to conventional copper lead bearings with lead base overlay.
Journal Article

Low-viscosity Gear Oil Technology to Improve Wear at Tapered Roller Bearings in Differential Gear Unit

2016-10-17
2016-01-2204
Torque loss reduction at differential gear unit is important to improve the fuel economy of automobiles. One effective way is to decrease the viscosity of lubricants as it results in less churning loss. However, this option creates a higher potential for thin oil films, which could damage the mechanical parts. At tapered roller bearings, in particular, wear at the large end face of rollers and its counterpart, known as bearing bottom wear is one of major failure modes. To understand the wear mechanism, wear at the rolling contact surface of rollers and its counterpart, known as bearing side wear, was also observed to confirm the wear impact on the tapered roller bearings. Because gear oils are also required to avoid seizure under extreme pressure, the combination of a phosphorus anti-wear agent and a sulfurous extreme pressure agent are formulated.
Technical Paper

Influence of New Engine Oil Additives on the Properties of Fluoroelastomers

1998-10-19
982437
Fluoroelastmers are well known for their resistance to heat and fluids, and have become major material for crankcase oil seals. On the other hand, new additive formulations are developed for engine lubricants used for fuel economic gasoline engines. In this paper, the effects of those additives on properties of fluoroelastmers are investigated. The results of the immersion tests of both test plaques and oil seal products indicate that dithiocarbamates, friction modifier, have hardening effects on fluoroelastmers. The fluoroelastmer deterioration mechanism is determined by analysis of elastmer samples after immersion in oil.
Journal Article

Influence of Bio Diesel Fuel on Engine Oil Performance

2010-05-05
2010-01-1543
To evaluate the influence of FAME, which has poor oxidation stability, on engine oil performance, an engine test was conducted under large volumes of fuel dilution by post-injection. The test showed that detergent consumption and polymerization of FAME were accelerated in engine oil, causing a severe deterioration in piston cleanliness and sludge protection performance of engine oil.
Technical Paper

Improvement of NOx Storage-Reduction Catalyst

2002-03-04
2002-01-0732
In order to further improve the performance of NOx storage-reduction catalysts (NSR catalysts), focus was placed on their high temperature performance deterioration via sulfur poisoning and heat deterioration. The reactions between the basicity or acidity of supports and the storage element, potassium, were analyzed. It was determined that the high temperature performance of NSR catalysts is enhanced by the interaction between potassium and zirconia, which is a basic metal oxide. Also, a new zirconia-titania complex metal oxides was developed to improve high temperature performance and to promote the desorption of sulfur from the supports after aging.
Technical Paper

Hardfaced Valve and P/M Valve Seat System for CNG and LPG Fuel Engines

2005-04-11
2005-01-0718
When adapted for use in automotive engines, CNG and LPG are considered environmentally friendly compared to gasoline or diesel fuel. However, when these gaseous fuels are used, wear of the valve seat insert and valve face increases if materials meant for use with gasoline are adopted. In comparison to a gasoline engine, the oxide membrane that is formed on the sliding surfaces of the valve face and valve seat insert is limited. As a consequence, adhesion occurs and increased wear of these components is the result. Based on analysis materials that are more compatible with these gaseous fuels were developed.
Technical Paper

Examination of Crack Growth Behavior in Induction Hardened Material under Torsional Fatigue

2011-04-12
2011-01-0198
Since wear resistance and fatigue strength are key requirements for chassis components, induction hardening is widely used to apply compressive stress for controlling crack growth. Therefore, it is crucial that the influence of defects is examined with compressive residual stress applied to parts. In this report, the relationship between crack depth and compressive residual stress is evaluated using a cylindrical specimen and a torsional fatigue test. The test results were found to be consistent with CAE simulations performed in advance. In the future, it will be necessary to make this method applicable to product design to further improve vehicle safety performance.
Technical Paper

Development of a New Valvetrain Wear Test - The Sequence IVB Test

2016-04-05
2016-01-0891
The study described in this paper covers the development of the Sequence IVB low-temperature valvetrain wear test as a replacement test platform for the existing ASTM D6891 Sequence IVA for the new engine oil category, ILSAC GF-6. The Sequence IVB Test uses a Toyota engine with dual overhead camshafts, direct-acting mechanical lifter valvetrain system. The original intent for the new test was to be a direct replacement for the Sequence IVA. Due to inherent differences in valvetrain system design between the Sequence IVA and IVB engines, it was necessary to alter existing test conditions to ensure adequate wear was produced on the valvetrain components to allow discrimination among the different lubricant formulations. A variety of test conditions and wear parameters were evaluated in the test development. Radioactive tracer technique (RATT) was used to determine the wear response of the test platform to various test conditions.
Technical Paper

Development of Low Sulfated Ash and Fuel Economy Diesel Engine Oil

2009-06-15
2009-01-1845
A low sulfated ash (S.Ash) DL-1/C2 0W-30 diesel engine oil with improved fuel economy has been developed to meet the PM targets outlined in the Euro 5 emissions standards and to help achieve the voluntary European CO2 target of 140 g/km. The newly developed engine oil is an effective solution to the trilemma (triple probrem) of reliability (high detergency and high anti wear), low S.Ash, and fuel economy, achieving a fuel economy improvement of 2% and reducing CO2 emissions by 3 g/km.
Technical Paper

Development of High Performance Three-Way-Catalyst Technology to Lower NOx Emission

2009-04-20
2009-01-1398
One primary result of the reduction of platinum group metals (PGM) within a catalytic converter is the decline in NOx conversion efficiency. This paper hypothesizes that the primary factor of this decline to be hydrocarbon (HC) poisoning. To maintain high NOx conversion efficiency as the PGM reduces, Rh activation improvement becomes significant to overcome the HC poisoning. Analysis of the Rh deterioration mechanism found that it is effective to separately arrange Rh and CeO2 on the converter, avoiding the Rh deactivation. By this improvement, we improved the catalyst activity at less than 25% of the original Rh loading.
Technical Paper

Analysis and Simplification of Thermal Endurance Tests of NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts

2004-03-08
2004-01-1496
Our two types of NOx storage-reduction (NSR) catalyst have been tested under various conditions of thermal endurance; the performance of these catalysts have been regressed to give the formulas that enable to estimate the performance after thermal endurance; and we have found the method to simplify (shorten the duration of) the thermal endurance tests and that the thermal deterioration of NSR catalysts is controlled by the worst condition of endurance (at least approximately). The regression formula for the amount of potassium that contributes to the catalyst performance (active K) after the endurance has also been obtained. These formulas predict that the amount of active K is the least for the worst condition of endurance and suggest a difference in deterioration mechanism that reflects the performance between low and high temperatures and the portion of worse deterioration (front or rear).
Technical Paper

A Comparison of Methods for Evaluating Automatic Transmission Fluid Effects on Friction Torque Capacity - A Study by the International Lubricant Standardization and Approval Committee (ILSAC) ATF Subcommittee

1998-10-19
982672
As part of the International Lubricant Standardization and Approval Committee's (ILSAC) goal of developing a global automatic transmission fluid (ATF) specification, members have been evaluating test methods that are currently used by various automotive manufacturers for qualifying ATF for use in their respective transmissions. This report deals with comparing test methods used for determining torque capacity in friction systems (shifting clutches). Three test methods were compared, the Plate Friction Test from the General Motors DEXRON®-III Specification, the Friction Durability Test from the Ford MERCON® Specification, and the Japanese Automotive Manufacturers Association Friction Test - JASO Method 348-95. Eight different fluids were evaluated. Friction parameters used in the comparison were breakaway friction, dynamic friction torque at midpoint and the end of engagement, and the ratio of end torque to midpoint torque.
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