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Technical Paper

Water Jacket Spacer for Improvement of Cylinder Bore Temperature Distribution

2005-04-11
2005-01-1156
For reduction of fuel consumption, a new device “Water Jacket Spacer” which improves temperature distribution of a cylinder block bore wall was developed. In the case of a conventional cylinder block, coolant flow concentrates at the bottom and middle region of the water jacket. While temperature of the upper bore wall is high (due to high-temperature combustion gas) the temperature of the lower bore wall is low, since its only function is to support the piston. When the developed spacer is inserted into a water jacket, the coolant flow concentrates at the upper part of the jacket. As a result, cooling ability to the upper bore wall was improved and temperature of lower bore wall was increased, thereby reducing fuel consumption.
Technical Paper

Two-Dimensional Temperature Measurements in Diesel Piston Bowl Using Phosphor Thermometry

2009-09-13
2009-24-0033
Phosphor thermometry was used during fuel injection in an optical engine with the glass piston of reentrant type. SiO2 coated phosphor particle was used for the gas-phase temperature measurements, which gave much less background signal. The measurements were performed in motored mode, in combustion mode with injection of n-heptane and in non-combustion mode with injection of iso-octane. In the beginning of injection period, the mean temperature of each injection cases was lower than that of the motored case, and temperature of iso-octane injection cases was even lower than that of n-heptane injection cases. This indicates, even if vaporization effect seemed to be the same at both injection cases, the effect of temperature decrease changed due to the chemical reaction effect for the n-heptane cases. Chemical reaction seems to be initiated outside of the fuel liquid spray and the position was moving towards the fuel rich area as the time proceeds.
Technical Paper

Theoretical Study on Spray Design for Small-Bore Diesel Engine

2016-04-05
2016-01-0740
1 Recently, demand for small-bore compact vehicle engines has been increasing from the standpoint of further reducing CO2 emissions. The generalization and formulation of combustion processes, including those related to emissions formation, based on a certain similarity of physical phenomena regardless of engine size, would be extremely beneficial for the unification of development processes for various sizes of engines. The objective of this study is to clarify what constraints are necessary for engine/nozzle specifications and injection conditions to achieve the same combustion characteristics (such as heat release rate and emissions) in diesel engines with different bore sizes.
Technical Paper

Small Bore Diesel Engine Combustion Concept

2015-04-14
2015-01-0788
Small bore diesel engines often adopt a two-valve cylinder head and a non-central injector layout to expand the port flow passage area. This non-central injector layout causes asymmetrical gas flow and fuel distribution, resulting in worse heat losses and a less homogenous fuel-air mixture than an equivalent four-valve cylinder head layout with a central injector. This paper describes the improvement of piston bowl geometry to achieve a more homogeneous gas flow and fuel-air mixture. This concept reduced fuel consumption by 2.5% compared to the original piston bowl geometry, while also reducing NOx emissions by 10%.
Technical Paper

Research of Knocking Deterioration due to Accumulated Carbon Deposits on Piston Surfaces

2019-04-02
2019-01-1141
In recent years, fuel economy regulation is expanding to reduce CO2 emission and energy saving in world wide. To achieve the regulation, automaker efforts to develop electrification technology and improve engine thermal efficiency with high compression ratio. On the other hand, variety of fuels such as a reformed gasoline and bio fuel share is growing rapidly to utilize of fossil fuel by legal arrangements. With the spread of reformed gasoline, there are some risk of increased carbon deposit and accumulated on piston surface, due to heavy aromatic and olefin in the fuel. In combustion point of view, knocking should be deteriorated by synergy effect both accumulated carbon deposit and said high compression ratio. Furthermore, knocking deterioration do not occur in regularly, especially they occur in low-middle engine load. However, this mechanism is not clear.
Journal Article

Reduction of Heat Loss and Improvement of Thermal Efficiency by Application of “Temperature Swing” Insulation to Direct-Injection Diesel Engines

2016-04-05
2016-01-0661
The reduction of the heat loss from the in-cylinder gas to the combustion chamber wall is one of the key technologies for improving the thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines. This paper describes an experimental verification of the “temperature swing” insulation concept, whereby the surface temperature of the combustion chamber wall follows that of the transient gas. First, we focus on the development of “temperature swing” insulation materials and structures with the thermo-physical properties of low thermal conductivity and low volumetric heat capacity. Heat flux measurements for the developed insulation coating show that a new insulation material formed from silica-reinforced porous anodized aluminum (SiRPA) offers both heat-rejecting properties and reliability in an internal combustion engine. Furthermore, a laser-induced phosphorescence technique was used to verify the temporal changes in the surface temperature of the developed insulation coating.
Technical Paper

Reduction of Friction Losses in Crankcase at High Engine Speeds

2006-10-16
2006-01-3350
Recently, engines achieving high power levels are becoming increasingly common. The trend is toward increasing the inflow of lubricating oil into the crankcase through several factors (for example, increasing the flow rate of the cooling oil jets in order to reduce the thermal load of the pistons). In addition, the mechanical losses induced by the motion of the crankshaft and connecting rods through the additional oil are intensified due to the higher engine speeds at maximum power. In this article, we confirmed a method of separating the pumping loss and the agitation loss by measuring the pressure in the crankcase and an empirical formula was found for predicting pumping loss from displacement and ventilating area. We also investigated the effect of reducing the lubrication oil flow rate, as well as other factors affecting the oil flow, on the mechanical loss at high engine speeds.
Technical Paper

Low Cooling Losses and Low Emission Analysis of Small Bore Diesel Engine Combustion

2015-09-01
2015-01-1824
Small bore diesel engines often adopt a two-valve cylinder head and a non-central injector layout to expand the port flow passage area. This non-central injector layout causes asymmetrical gas flow and fuel distribution, resulting in worse heat losseses and a less homogenous fuel-air mixture than an equivalent four-valve cylinder head layout with a central injector. To improve these problems Toyota applied a new concept which was characterized by tapered shape design on the upper portion of the piston and low compression ratio to achieve more homogeneous gas flow and fuel-air mixture. This paper describes the impact of new combustion concept and the mechanism of the improvement by 3D-CFD analysis and optical measurement.
Journal Article

Investigation of Engine Oil Effect on Abnormal Combustion in Turbocharged Direct Injection - Spark Ignition Engines

2012-09-10
2012-01-1615
Abnormal combustion referred to as Low Speed Pre-Ignition (LSPI) may restrict low speed torque improvements in turbocharged Direct Injection (DI) - Spark Ignition (SI) Engines. Recent investigations have reported that the auto-ignition of an engine oil droplet from the piston crevice in the combustion chamber may cause unexpected and random LSPI. This study shows that engine oil formulations have significant effects on LSPI. We found that the spontaneous ignition temperature of engine oil, as determined using High-Pressure Differential Scanning Calorimetry (HP-DSC) correlates with LSPI frequency in a prototype turbocharged DI-SI engine. Based on these findings, we believe that the oxidation reaction of the oil is very important factor to the LSPI. Our test data, using a prototype engine, shows both preventative and contributory effects of base oil and metal-based engine oil additives.
Journal Article

Influence of Bio Diesel Fuel on Engine Oil Performance

2010-05-05
2010-01-1543
To evaluate the influence of FAME, which has poor oxidation stability, on engine oil performance, an engine test was conducted under large volumes of fuel dilution by post-injection. The test showed that detergent consumption and polymerization of FAME were accelerated in engine oil, causing a severe deterioration in piston cleanliness and sludge protection performance of engine oil.
Technical Paper

Flow and Temperature Distribution in an Experimental Engine: LES Studies and Thermographic Imaging

2010-10-25
2010-01-2237
Temperature stratification plays an important role in HCCI combustion. The onsets of auto-ignition and combustion duration are sensitive to the temperature field in the engine cylinder. Numerical simulations of HCCI engine combustion are affected by the use of wall boundary conditions, especially the temperature condition at the cylinder and piston walls. This paper reports on numerical studies and experiments of the temperature field in an optical experimental engine in motored run conditions aiming at improved understanding of the evolution of temperature stratification in the cylinder. The simulations were based on Large-Eddy-Simulation approach which resolves the unsteady energetic large eddy and large scale swirl and tumble structures. Two dimensional temperature experiments were carried out using laser induced phosphorescence with thermographic phosphors seeded to the gas in the cylinder.
Technical Paper

Engine Thermal Control for Improving the Engine Thermal Efficiency and Anti-Knocking Quality

2012-04-16
2012-01-0377
In recent years, improving the engine thermal efficiency is strongly required. To enhance the engine thermal efficiency, it is important to improve the engine anti-knock quality. Technologies for modifying engine cooling have been developed to improve anti-knocking quality of engines. However, excessive improvement of engine cooling leads to an increase in cooling heat loss. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the effects of the temperature of each part of the engine such as engine head-cylinder, cylinder-liner, and piston on knocking and cooling heat loss. In this paper, computer aided engineering (CAE) is used to predict the effects of each part of the engine on engine knocking and cooling heat loss. Firstly, the amount of heat energy that air-fuel mixture receives from engine cylinder-head, cylinder-liner, and piston is calculated during the intake stroke. The result shows that the cylinder-liner contributes largest heat energy to air-fuel mixture, especially the exhaust side.
Technical Paper

Development of Piston and Piston Ring Lubrication Analysis

2015-09-01
2015-01-2039
The reduction of CO2 emissions has become an imperative duty in order to cope with environmental compliance. For car manufacturers, CO2 emission has been set by regulation and many consumers prefer a fuel efficient car because of the increasing fuel price. In such a situation, reducing engine friction is an effective way of improving fuel efficiency. Among engine parts, the piston counts for a large percentage of the friction losses. In this study, we established a calculation model for estimating piston and piston ring friction. This paper shows how the accuracy of the calculation model was improved by validating against measurements.
Technical Paper

Development of High-Strength Aluminum Piston Material

2010-04-12
2010-01-0220
Mass reduction of parts is growing in importance as a means for reducing CO2 emissions from vehicles.The aim of the present research was to contribute to further mass reduction of pistons by developing a new aluminum casting material with highest level of fatigue strength. This goal was achieved using a development concept of creating a homogeneous structure in which Ti was added to create a fine structure and appropriate quantities of Fe and Mn were added to form a compound that is stable at high temperatures. Stand-alone tests of prototype pistons fabricated using the developed material show that the material is 14% stronger than the conventional material, thereby enabling increases in power and mass reduction.
Technical Paper

Development of High Fidelity Combustion-Driven Vehicle Models for Driveability Using Advanced Multi-Body Simulations

2007-04-16
2007-01-1634
This paper demonstrates the development of a full multi-body vehicle model and its use in virtual design and troubleshooting of a vehicle response to throttle input. The multibody model is divided into three main subsystems: the chassis, the driveline and the powertrain subsystems. The chassis system includes a complete representation of both the front and the rear suspensions, both the front and rear subframes, and the vehicle body. The driveline system includes the output shafts from the transmission unit to the tires. The powertrain system includes complete representation of the cranktrain for a V6 combustion engine. Also included in the powertrain is a nonlinear representation of the gearbox where bearing clearances and gear lashes are considered. The cranktrain torque output is linked to the transmission using a torque converter model. The vehicle components are virtually assembled together through different joint types, force elements, and kinematic constraints.
Technical Paper

Development of Computer Aided Engineering for Piston Design

1989-02-01
890775
Computer Aided Engineering system for automotive piston design was developed which can predict total piston performance in a short time at the planning stage of piston design. Many previous studies attempted to calculate piston performance accurately with experimental data and their main purpose was not to create a tool for piston design. The purpose of this CAE system is to provide a tool for a designer to predict total piston performance easily and rapidly without experimental data. This system has following two characteristics. Firstly, new finite element methods were developed which can predict temperature distribution without experimental data, thermal skirt expansion for a strutted piston and skirt-to-bore contact pressure under engine operating conditions. The predicted result are accurate enough to predict piston performance at the planning stage of piston design.
Journal Article

Development of CFD Inverse Analysis Technology Using the Transient Adjoint Method and Its Application to Engine In-Cylinder Flow

2016-04-05
2016-01-0607
Conventional CFD-based shape optimization technology that uses parametric shape modification and optimal solutions searching algorithms has the two problems: (1) outcome of optimized shapes depend on the selection of design parameters made by the designer, and (2) high computational costs. To resolve those problems, two innovative inverse analysis technologies based on the Adjoint Method were developed in previous study: surface geometry deformation sensitivity analysis to identify the locations to be modified, and topology optimization to generate an optimal shape for maximizing the cost function in the constrained design space. However, these technologies are only applicable to steady flows. Since most flows in a vehicle (such as engine in-cylinder flow) are transient, a practical technology for surface geometry sensitivity analysis has been developed based on the Transient Adjoint Method.
Journal Article

Cooling Loss Reduction of Highly Dispersed Spray Combustion with Restricted In-Cylinder Swirl and Squish Flow in Diesel Engine

2012-04-16
2012-01-0689
In diesel engines with a straight intake port and a lipless cavity to restrict in-cylinder flow, an injector with numerous small-diameter orifices with a narrow angle can be used to create a highly homogeneous air-fuel mixture that, during PCCI combustion, dramatically reduces the NOX and soot without the addition of expensive new devices. To further improve this new combustion concept, this research focused on cooling losses, which are generally thought to account for 16 to 35% of the total energy of the fuel, and approaches to reducing fuel consumption were explored. First, to clarify the proportions of convective heat transfer and radiation in the cooling losses, a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM) was used to measure the local heat flux and radiation to the combustion chamber wall. The results showed that though larger amounts of injected fuel increased the proportion of heat losses from radiation, the primary factor in cooling losses is convective heat transfer.
Journal Article

Analysis of Piston Friction in Internal Combustion Engine

2013-10-14
2013-01-2515
The purpose of this study is to analyze the piston skirt friction reduction effect of a diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated wrist pin. The floating liner method and elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) simulation were used to analyze piston skirt friction. The experimental results showed that a DLC-coated wrist pin reduced cylinder liner friction, and that this reduction was particularly large at low engine speeds and large pin offset conditions. Friction was particularly reduced at around the top and bottom dead center positions (TDC and BDC). EHL simulation confirmed that a DLC-coated wrist pin affects the piston motion and reduces the contact pressure between the piston skirt and cylinder liner.
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