Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 8 of 8
Technical Paper

The Role of Carboxylate-Based Coolants in Cast Iron Corrosion Protection

2001-03-05
2001-01-1184
Nitrites have long been added to heavy-duty coolant to inhibit iron cylinder liner corrosion initiated by cavitation. However, in heavy-duty use, nitrites deplete from the coolant, which then must be refortified using supplemental coolant additives (SCA's). Recently, carboxylates have also been found to provide excellent cylinder liner protection in heavy-duty application. Unlike nitrites, carboxylate inhibitors deplete slowly and thus do not require continual refortification with SCA's. In the present paper laboratory aging experiments shed light on the mechanism of cylinder liner protection by these inhibitors. The performance of carboxylates, nitrites and mixtures of the two inhibitors are compared. Results correlate well with previously published fleet data. Specifically, rapid nitrite and slow carboxylate depletion are observed. More importantly, when nitrite and carboxylates are used in combination, nitrite depletion is repressed while carboxylates deplete at a very slow rate.
Technical Paper

Solder Protection with Extended Life, Carboxylate-Based Coolants

2000-06-19
2000-01-1979
Silicate-free, carboxylate based technology as typified by Texaco Extended Life Coolant (TELC) and Caterpillar Extended Life Coolant (ELC), both meeting Caterpillar's EC-1 Coolant Specification, offer excellent corrosion protection for commercial lead solders commonly used in the fabrication of copper/brass radiators and heater cores throughout the trucking industry. Results of laboratory testing using solders from commercial radiators manufacturers and extensive field coolant analysis compare extended life technology with the popular conventional coolant technologies. In the laboratory, the effect of coolant concentration on solder protection is explored using the glassware corrosion test, ASTM D-1384. At concentrations ranging from 33% up to 75% the carboxylate technology offers comparable to superior protection when compared to the popular heavy-duty conventional coolant containing silicates and phosphates.
Technical Paper

Performance of Organic Acid Based Coolants in Heavy Duty Applications

1996-02-01
960644
Coolant formulations based on organic acid corrosion inhibitor technology have been tested in over 180 heavy duty engines for a total of more than 50 million kilometers. This testing has been used to document long life coolant performance in various engine types from four major engine manufacturers. Inspections of engines using organic acid based coolant (with no supplemental coolant additive) for up to 610,000 kilometers showed excellent protection of metal engine components. Improved protection was observed against cylinder liner, water pump, and aluminum spacer deck corrosion. In addition, data accumulated from this testing were used to develop depletion rate curves for long life coolant corrosion inhibitors, including tolyltriazole and nitrite. Nitrite was observed to deplete less rapidly in long life coolants than in conventional formulations.
Technical Paper

Extreme Field Test for Organic Additive Coolant Technology

2005-11-01
2005-01-3579
Field testing of an extended life coolant technology in Class 8 trucks, equipped with Caterpillar C-12 engines revealed excellent coolant life with negligible inhibitor depletion to 400,000 miles with no refortification and no coolant top-off. In separate evaluations in Caterpillar 3406E equipped trucks, extended corrosion protection and component durability were established out to 700,000 miles, without the need for refortification other than top-off.
Technical Paper

Development of Electronic Fan Control Systems

1994-09-01
941765
Engine cooling fan systems for off-highway machinery require a significant amount of horsepower and contribute to the overall noise level of the machine. Reducing fan speed in times of low cooling demand provides a means to reduce vehicle noise levels and divert engine horsepower from the fan to do productive work. The fan must, however, continue to provide adequate airflow when demanded by the cooling system. Electronic fan controls that modulate fan speed to meet changing cooling system requirements provide the above advantages.
Technical Paper

A Transient Heat Transfer System for Research Engines

2007-04-16
2007-01-0975
An ongoing goal of the Powertrain Control Research Laboratory (PCRL) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has been to expand and improve the ability of the single cylinder internal combustion research engine to represent its multi-cylinder engine counterpart. To date, the PCRL single cylinder engine test system is able to replicate both the rotational dynamics (SAE #2004-01-0305) and intake manifold dynamics (SAE #2006-01-1074) of a multi cylinder engine using a single cylinder research engine. Another area of interest is the replication of multi-cylinder engine cold start emissions data with a single-cylinder engine test system. For this replication to occur, the single-cylinder engine must experience heat transfer to the engine coolant as if it were part of a multi-cylinder engine, in addition to the other multi-cylinder engine transient effects.
Technical Paper

A Method for Precise Placement of Hose Models

2013-04-08
2013-01-0603
A method is presented for precise mounting of a hose model with any specified twist. Once mounting points and directions are specified, a hose of a specified length can be developed using discrete beams. A divide and conquer approach is employed to position, orient, decouple the free end of the hose model in a twist free state that is then twisted to a specified angle. The development of the kinematic elements necessary to do this is presented. Some Cosserat models have been shown to branch into multiple solutions while the method presented here has always converged to the minimum energy solution. The method for linking the hose model to other linkages is discussed as well one common error committed by users in implementing the link. In order to model the torsional properties of the hose, the torsional stiffness must be modified. A method for doing this using digital scans is discussed.
Technical Paper

A Bench Test Procedure for Evaluating the Cylinder Liner Pitting Protection Performance of Engine Coolant Additives for Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Applications

1996-02-01
960879
Evaluations of the liner pitting protection performance provided by engine coolant corrosion inhibitors and supplemental coolant additives have presented many problems. Current practice involves the use of full scale engine tests to show that engine coolant inhibitors provide sufficient liner pitting protection. These are too time-consuming and expensive to use as the basis for industry-wide specifications. Ultrasonic vibratory test rigs have been used for screening purposes in individual labs, but these have suffered from poor reproducibility and insufficient additive differentiation. A new test procedure has been developed that reduces these problems. The new procedure compares candidate formulations against a good and bad reference fluid to reduce the concern for problems with calibration and equipment variability. Cast iron test coupons with well-defined microstructure and processing requirements significantly reduce test variability.
X