Refine Your Search

Topic

Search Results

Technical Paper

Virtual Key Life Tests of Instrument Panels for Product Development

2004-03-08
2004-01-1482
Visteon has developed a CAE procedure to qualify instrument panel (IP) products under the vehicle key life test environments, by employing a set of CAE simulation and durability techniques. The virtual key life test method simulates the same structural configuration and the proving ground road loads as in the physical test. A representative dynamic road load profile model is constructed based on the vehicle proving ground field data. The dynamic stress simulation is realized by employing the finite element transient analysis. The durability evaluation is based on the dynamic stress results and the material fatigue properties of each component. The procedure has helped the IP engineering team to identify and correct potential durability problems at earlier design stage without a prototype. It has shown that the CAE virtual key life test procedure provides a way to speed up IP product development, to minimize prototypes and costs.
Technical Paper

Vibration Test Specification for Automotive Products Based on Measured Vehicle Load Data

2006-04-03
2006-01-0729
A test load specification is required to validate an automotive product to meet the durability and design life requirements. Traditionally in the automotive industry, load specifications for design validation tests are directly given by OEMs, which are generally developed from an envelop of generic customer usage profiles and are, in most cases, over-specified. In recent years, however, there are many occasions that a proposed load specification for a particular product is requested. The particular test load specification for a particular product is generated based on the measured load data at its mounting location on the given type of vehicles, which contains more realistic time domain load levels and associated frequency contents. The measured time domain load is then processed to frequency domain test load data by using the fast Fourier transform and damage equivalent techniques.
Technical Paper

Statistical Modeling of Fatigue Crack Growth in Wing Skin Fastener Holes

2012-04-16
2012-01-0482
Estimation and prediction of residual life and reliability are serious concerns in life cycle management for aging structures. Laboratory testing replicating fatigue loading for a typical military aircraft wing skin was undertaken. Specimens were tested until their fatigue life expended reached 100% of the component fatigue life. Then, scanning electron microscopy was used to quantify the size and location of fatigue cracks within the high stress regions of simulated fastener holes. Distributions for crack size, nearest neighbor distances, and spatial location were characterized statistically in order to estimate residual life and to provide input for life cycle management. Insights into crack initiation and growth are also provided.
Technical Paper

Simple Application of DOE Methods to Reduce Whistle Noise in a HPAS Pump Relief Valve

2005-05-16
2005-01-2468
The present work demonstrates the application of Design of Experiments (DOE) statistical methods to the design and the improvement of a hydraulic steering pump noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) performance in relief. DOE methods were applied to subjective ratings to examine the effect of several different factors, as well as the interactions between these factors on pump relief NVH. Specifically, the DOE was applied to the geometry of the cross ports on a hydraulic relief valve to improve “whistle” noise in the pump. Statistical methods were applied to determine which factors and interactions had a significant effect on pump whistle. These factors were used to produce a more robust cross port configuration reducing whistle noise. Lastly, the final configuration was experimentally verified on the test apparatus and subjectively confirmed in vehicle-level testing.
Technical Paper

Setting the Record Straight with Capability Indices

2004-03-08
2004-01-1747
There is still much controversy and confusion in industry today regarding the use of process capability indices and analysis. A lack of knowledge regarding the underlying variation assumptions and rationale sampling strategies in indices such as Cp, Cpk, Pp and Ppk have added to the confusion and in many cases has led to misapplication of these widely used metrics. This issue has also promoted inconsistency in the assessment of long-term versus short-term capability and has hampered the true characterization of processes which is a critical step in any continuous improvement effort. Capability indices and analysis, when properly applied can impart a wealth of knowledge regarding process performance as well as provide focus for improvement activity through the proper characterization and enumeration of variation. Being able to properly characterize variation if the first step in reducing it.
Technical Paper

Optimizing the Effects of Body Attachment Stiffness on Steering Column In-Vehicle Modes

2001-03-05
2001-01-0041
This paper presents an unambiguous and intuitive method for identification of steering column resonant (SCR) mode of vibration. One simple but overlooked technique to determine the SCR mode in-vehicle is to provide local stiffnesses of the body locations where the Instrument Panel (IP) attaches, to the IP suppliers to be used in their design and development. This paper describes how this technique is useful in predicting the first few important in-vehicle steering column modes for different classes of vehicles, with examples presented in each class. The results obtained from such analyses are compared against those from direct in-buck simulations. This technique is not limited to its application in developing IP systems, but can easily be extended to include other systems such as seats, fuel tanks, etc. Also it is shown that a design optimization analysis may be performed using these attachment stiffnesses as design variables resulting in a system level solution.
Technical Paper

Optimal Design of Roller One Way Clutch for Starter Drives

2004-03-08
2004-01-1151
The starter drive clutch is a one way roller clutch and a key component in a starter motor that is used to crank internal combustion engines. The starter drive clutch transmits torque from an electrical motor to a ring gear mounted on a cranking shaft in an engine thus cranks the engine. The clutch also prevents the whole starter from damage caused by extremely high load and/or extremely high speed applied to the starter pinion from the engine. Drive slippage and barrel cracking are two major failure modes for the starter drive[1]. Insufficient torque capacity results in drive slippage while excessive high hoop stress on the clutch barrel ring causes barrel crack. To eliminate drive slippage failure, the clutch should be designed with high torque capacity. High torque capacity, however, is a cause of high hoop stress on the barrel that may result in the cracked barrel failure. Higher torque capacity and lower hoop stress are two completely opposite design directions.
Technical Paper

Multivariate Statistical Methods for the Analysis of NVH Data

2005-05-16
2005-01-2518
The present work discusses the application of multivariate statistical methods for the analysis of NVH data. Unlike conventional statistical methods which generally consider single-value, or univariate data, multivariate methods enable the user to examine multiple response variables and their interactions simultaneously. This characteristic is particularly useful in the examination of NVH data, where multiple measurements are typically used to assess NVH performance. In this work, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was used to examine the NVH data from a benchmarking study of hydraulic steering pumps. A total of twelve NVH measurements for each of 99 pump samples were taken. These measurements included steering pump orders and overall levels for vibration and sound pressure level at two microphone locations. Application of the PCA method made it possible to examine the entire set of data at once.
Technical Paper

Model-based Closed-loop Control of Urea SCR Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Diesel Engine

2002-03-04
2002-01-0287
Based on our error budget analysis, the urea SCR aftertreatment system is uncontrollable under EPA 2007-emission level without an effective closed-loop control strategy. The objective of the closed-loop control is to improve transient response as well as reduce the steady state control error. But the inherent large dead time in the urea SCR aftertreatment system makes the closed-loop control a challenge. In this paper, an innovative closed-loop control architecture is introduced, which combines model-based feedforward control with variable gain-scheduling feedback control. Transient response is improved with the inverse-dynamic feedforward control and the variable-gain closed-loop control. The steady-state response is improved with the closed-loop control. Based on this new strategy, a controller is designed and validated under the simulation and test cell environment. Comparison with the baseline open-loop controller is also conducted. Finally, some conclusions are presented.
Technical Paper

Model Reference Adaptive Control of a Pneumatic Valve Actuator for Infinitely Variable Valve Timing and Lift

2007-04-16
2007-01-1297
Electro-pneumatic valve actuators are used to eliminate the cam shaft of a traditional internal combustion engine. They are used to control the opening timing, duration, and lift of both intake and exhaust valves. A physics based nonlinear mathematical model called the level one model was built using Newton's law, mass conservation and thermodynamic principles. A control oriented model, the level two model, was created by partially linearizing the level one model for model reference parameter identification. This model reduces computational throughput and enables real-time implementation. A model reference adaptive control system was used to identify the nonlinear parameters that were needed for generating a feedforward control signal. The closed-loop valve lift tracking, valve opening and closing timing control strategies were proposed.
Technical Paper

Inaudible Knock and Partial-Burn Detection Using In-Cylinder Ionization Signal

2003-10-27
2003-01-3149
Internal combustion engines are designed to maximize power subject to meeting exhaust emission requirements and minimizing fuel consumption. Maximizing engine power and fuel economy is limited by engine knock for a given air-to-fuel charge. Therefore, the ability to detect engine knock and run the engine at its knock limit is a key for the best power and fuel economy. This paper shows inaudible knock detection ability using in-cylinder ionization signals over the entire engine speed and load map. This is especially important at high engine speed and high EGR rates. The knock detection ability is compared between three sensors: production knock (accelerometer) sensor, in-cylinder pressure and ionization sensors. The test data shows that the ionization signals can be used to detect inaudible engine knock while the conventional knock sensor cannot under some engine operational conditions.
Technical Paper

IC Engine Retard Ignition Timing Limit Detection and Control using In-Cylinder Ionization Signal

2004-10-25
2004-01-2977
Internal combustion engines are designed to maximize power subject to meeting exhaust emission requirements and minimizing fuel consumption. However, the usable range of ignition timing is often limited by knock in the advance direction and by combustion instability (partial burn and misfire) in the retard direction. This paper details a retard limit management system utilizing ionization signals in order to maintain the desired combustion quality and prevent the occurrence of misfire without using fixed limits. In-cylinder ionization signals are processed to derive a metric for combustion quality and closeness of combustion to partial burn/misfire limit, which is used to provide a limiting value for the baseline ignition timing in the retard direction. For normal operations, this assures that the combustion variability is kept within an acceptable range.
Technical Paper

Fuel Economy Improvements through Improved Automatic Transmission Warmup - Stand Alone Oil to Air (OTA) Transmission Cooling Strategy with Thermostatic Cold Flow Bypass Valve

2001-05-14
2001-01-1760
The stand alone oil to air (OTA) transmission cooling strategy with thermostatic cold flow bypass valve has been shown to be an effective means of improving the warmup of an automatic transmission. Improving the system warmup rate of an automatic transmission significantly improves its efficiency by reducing losses resulting from extremely viscous transmission fluid and can allow for calibration changes that improve overall transmission performance. Improved transmission efficiency in turn allows for improved engine efficiency and performance. The improvements obtained from increased transmission and engine efficiency result in an overall increase in vehicle fuel economy. Fuel economy and consumption are important parameters considered by the vehicle manufacturer and the customer. Fuel economy can be considered as important as reliability and durability.
Technical Paper

Finite Element Study of a Composite Tube Under Impact Load

2002-03-04
2002-01-0723
Composite materials can be used effectively for structural applications where high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios are required. Although the design and analysis techniques for static, buckling and vibration loadings are fairly well established, methodologies for analysis of composite structures under impact loading are still a major research activity. This paper presents a nonlinear finite-element analysis method to analyze a composite structure subjected to axial impact load. The analysis was performed using MSC/DYTRAN FE code while pre and post processing were done using MSC/PATRAN program. In addition, a steel tube of the same geometry was analyzed for comparison purpose.
Technical Paper

Finite Element Model Correlation of an Automotive Propshaft with Internal and External Dampers

2004-03-08
2004-01-0862
In the absence of prototypes, analytical methods such as finite element analysis are very useful in resolving noise and vibration problems, by predicting dynamic behavior of the automotive components and systems. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is a simulation technique and involves making assumptions that affect analytical results. Acceptance and use of these results is greatly enhanced through test validation. In this paper, dynamic behavior of the automotive propshaft equipped with cardboard liner and torsional damper is investigated. The finite element model is validated at both component and subsystem levels using frequency response functions. Effects of the cardboard liner and torsional damper on the propshaft bending, torsional and breathing frequencies are studied under free-free boundary conditions. Effects of the U-Joint stiffness along with other design variables on the driveshaft dynamic behavior are also studied.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of a Multi-Leaf Hybrid Springs for Automotive Suspensions

2004-03-08
2004-01-0782
The fundamentals of multi-leaf spring design as determined through beam theory offers a general perspective on how finite element analysis works. Additionally, the fundamentals of combining dissimilar materials require a basic knowledge of how the combined equivalent modulus affects the overall stiffness characteristics of multi-leaf design. By capturing these basic fundamentals into finite element modeling, an analysis of a steel-composite multi-leaf contact model relative to an idealized steel-composite multi-leaf model shows the importance of contact modeling. The results demonstrate the important differences between an idealized non-contact model relative to a complete contact model.
Technical Paper

Development of a Canning Method for Catalytic Converters using Ultra Thin Wall Substrates

2004-03-08
2004-01-0144
There are benefits of using ultra thin wall (UTW) substrates (i.e., 900/2, 400/4, etc) in lowering cost and emission level. However, the more fragile mechanical characteristics of the UTW present a challenge to design and manufacture of robust catalytic converters. This paper describes a method of canning trial, where a combined Design of Experiment / Monte-Carlo analysis method was used, to develop and validate a canning method for ultra thin wall substrates. Canning trials were conducted in two stages-- Prototype Canning Trial and Production Canning Trial. In Prototype Canning Trial, the root cause of substrate failure was identified and a model for predicting substrate failure was established. Key factors affecting scrap rate and gap capability were identified and predictions were performed on scrap rate and gap capability with the allowed variations in the key factors. The results provided guidelines in designing production line and process control.
Technical Paper

Correlation Study of Exhaust Manifold - Lab Test Results vs Customer Fleet Results

2002-03-04
2002-01-1317
The purpose of this study is to develop specifically a correlation between Exhaust Manifold Cracking Laboratory Test results and 150,000 mile customer fleet usage test results. The study shows that the exhaust manifold design meets the reliability requirements of 10 years or 150,000 miles, given 90th percentile customer usage without an evidence of cracking or audible leaks. This correlation between the Lab Test and the customer Fleet results has been expressed as an acceleration factor. An acceleration factor is the ratio of how much quicker the engine dynamometer test ( i.e. Lab Test ) can accumulate the effect of customer usage over time versus the customers themselves. The acceleration factor is provided for useful life time period of 10 years or 150,000 miles. The recommended acceleration factor, determined in this study, is 38 to 1, comparing the engine dynamometer test ( i.e. Lab Test ) results to 150,000 mile modular truck customer fleet field results.
Technical Paper

CAE Virtual Door Slam Test for Plastic Trim Components

2003-03-03
2003-01-1209
Visteon has developed a CAE procedure to qualify plastic door trim assemblies under the vehicle door slam Key Life Test (KLT) environments. The CAE Virtual Door Slam Test (VDST) procedure simulates the environment of a whole door structural assembly, as a hinged in-vehicle door slam configuration. It predicts the durability life of a plastic door trim sub-assembly, in terms of the number of slam cycles, based on the simulated stresses and plastic material fatigue damage model, at each critical location. The basic theory, FEA methods and techniques employed by the VDST procedure are briefly described in this paper. Door trim project examples are presented to illustrate the practical applications and their results, as well as the correlation with the physical door slam KLTs.
Technical Paper

Automated Finite Element Analysis of Fuel Rail Assemblies with the use of Knowledge Based Engineering Tools

2002-03-04
2002-01-1244
Realizing the value of knowledge, corporations are turning to Knowledge Based Engineering (KBE) as a design process. A fuel rail KBE tool was created at Visteon with the purpose of increasing knowledge retention and delivering knowledge based designs to the customer much quicker than with conventional methods. Currently, both engineers and CAD designers are using the Fuel Rail KBE Modeler at Visteon. It has been used on many vehicle programs and has saved the company countless person-hours of development time. The Fuel Rail KBE Modeler is a powerful tool that saves resources through automation of both the design and analysis processes. This paper documents the incorporation of automated FEA capability into the KBE environment.
X