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Standard

Valves, Safety, Cabin Air, General Specification For

2011-04-26
CURRENT
AS5379A
This specification covers the general requirements for cabin air safety valves for use in pressurized cabins of aircraft to prevent excess positive and negative pressures in the cabin and to provide a means of cabin pressure release in case of emergency.
Standard

Valves, Safety, Cabin Air, General Specification For

1999-11-01
HISTORICAL
AS5379
This specification covers the general requirements for cabin air safety valves for use in pressurized cabins of aircraft to prevent excess positive and negative pressures in the cabin and to provide a means of cabin pressure release in case of emergency.
Standard

Transparent Area Washing Systems for Aircraft

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1102A
This information report presents data and recommendations pertaining to the design and development of transparent area washing systems for aircraft.
Standard

Thermophysical Properties of the Natural Environment, Gases, Liquids, and Solids

1991-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/9
This AIR is arranged in the following four sections: 2A - Properties of the Natural Environment 2B - Properties of Gases 2C - Properties of Liquids 2D - Properties of Solids A summary of each section is given below. Section 2A - This section includes currently applicable earth atmosphere standards (Refs. 101 and 103) and data on the near-Earth environment. Limited data on Mars and Venus reflected solar and planetary-emitted radiation and on micrometeorite data are also included. For space vehicle applications, environmental models are of two general types: orbital and reentry. For orbital models, variable properties such as time and solar flux are usually averaged. Reentry atmospheres are chiefly a function of location and altitude, and selection may be based on reentry location. Variation with latitude is an important local effect (Ref. 106). The electromagnetic solar radiation data in this section are for altitudes above the Earth’s atmosphere.
Standard

Thermophysical Characteristics of Working Fluids and Heat Transfer Fluids

2017-05-19
CURRENT
AIR1168/10A
This AIR is arranged in the following two sections: 2E - Thermodynamic Characteristics of Working Fluids, which contains thermodynamic diagrams for a number of working fluids currently in use and supplied by various industrial firms. 2F - Properties of Heat Transfer Fluids, which contains data, primarily in graphical form, on fluids that are frequently used in fluid heat transfer loops. Other properties of the environment, gases, liquids, and solids, can be found, as follows, in AIR1168/9: 2A-Properties of the Natural Environment 2B-Properties of Gases 2C-Properties of Liquids 2D-Properties of Solids
Standard

Thermodynamics of Incompressible and Compressible Fluid Flow

1989-03-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/1
The fluid flow treated in this section is isothermal, subsonic, and incompressible. The effects of heat addition, work on the fluid, variation in sonic velocity, and changes in elevation are neglected. An incompressible fluid is one in which a change in pressure causes no resulting change in fluid density. The assumption that liquids are incompressible introduces no appreciable error in calculations, but the assumption that a gas is incompressible introduces an error of a magnitude that is dependent on the fluid velocity and on the loss coefficient of the particular duct section or piece of equipment. Fig. 1A-1 shows the error in pressure drop resulting from assuming that air is incompressible. With reasonably small loss coefficients and the accuracy that is usually required in most calculations, compressible fluids may be treated as incompressible for velocities less than Mach 0.2.
Standard

Thermodynamics of Incompressible and Compressible Fluid Flow

2019-04-11
CURRENT
AIR1168/1A
The fluid flow treated in this section is isothermal, subsonic, and incompressible. The effects of heat addition, work on the fluid, variation in sonic velocity, and changes in elevation are neglected. An incompressible fluid is one in which a change in pressure causes no resulting change in fluid density. The assumption that liquids are incompressible introduces no appreciable error in calculations, but the assumption that a gas is incompressible introduces an error of a magnitude that is dependent on the fluid velocity and on the loss coefficient of the particular duct section or piece of equipment. Fig. 1A-1 shows the error in pressure drop resulting from assuming that air is incompressible. With reasonably small loss coefficients and the accuracy that is usually required in most calculations, compressible fluids may be treated as incompressible for velocities less than Mach 0.2.
Standard

The Control of Excess Humidity in Avionics Cooling

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
ARP987A
The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) to review the problem of moisture in avionics equipment, (2) to outline methods for correcting conditions of excess moisture in existing avionics installations, and (3) to recommend design practices for new avionics cooling system installations which will minimize the adverse effects of moisture.
Standard

The Control of Excess Humidity in Avionics Cooling

2010-06-17
CURRENT
ARP987B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the causes and impacts of moisture and/or condensation in avionics equipment and provides recommendations for corrective and preventative action.
Standard

The Advanced Environmental Control System (AECS) Computer Program for Steady State Analysis and Preliminary System Sizing

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1706B
Many different computer programs have been developed to determine performance capabilities of aircraft environmental control systems, and to calculate size and weight tradeoffs during preliminary design. Many of these computer programs are limited in scope to a particular arrangement of components for a specific application. General techniques, providing flexibility to handle varied types of ECS configurations and different requirements (i.e., during conceptual or preliminary design, development, testing, production, and operation) are designated “company proprietary” and are not available for industry-wide use. This document describes capabilities, limitations, and potentials of a particular computer program which provides a general ECS analysis capability, and is available for use in industry. This program, names AECS1, was developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory (References 1 and 2).
Standard

Testing of Airplane Installed Environmental Control Systems (Ecs)

1960-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP217A
This document deals with ground and flight test of airplane installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS), Figure 1. The ECS provide an environment, controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include the following: pressure, temperature, humidity, ventilation air velocity, ventilation rate, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and environment composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.). The ECS are composed of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply, distribute, recycle and exhaust air to maintain the desired environment.
Standard

Testing of Airplane Installed Environmental Control Systems (Ecs)

1951-03-15
HISTORICAL
ARP217
This document deals with ground and flight test of airplane installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS), Figure 1. The ECS provide an environment, controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include the following: pressure, temperature, humidity, ventilation air velocity, ventilation rate, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and environment composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.). The ECS are composed of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply, distribute, recycle and exhaust air to maintain the desired environment.
Standard

Testing of Airplane Installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS)

1999-03-01
CURRENT
ARP217D
This document deals with ground and flight test of airplane installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS), Figure 1. The ECS provide an environment, controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include the following: pressure, temperature, humidity, ventilation air velocity, ventilation rate, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and environment composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.). The ECS are composed of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply, distribute, recycle and exhaust air to maintain the desired environment.
Standard

THERMOPHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF WORKING FLUIDS AND HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

1992-04-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/10
This AIR is arranged in the following two sections: 2E - Thermodynamic Characteristics of Working Fluids, which contains thermodynamic diagrams for a number of working fluids currently in use and supplied by various industrial firms. 2F - Properties of Heat Transfer Fluids, which contains data, primarily in graphical form, on fluids that are frequently used in fluid heat transfer loops. Other properties of the environment, gases, liquids, and solids, can be found, as follows, in AIR1168/9: 2A-Properties of the Natural Environment 2B-Properties of Gases 2C-Properties of Liquids 2D-Properties of Solids
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