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Valves, Safety, Cabin Air, General Specification For

2011-04-26
CURRENT
AS5379A
This specification covers the general requirements for cabin air safety valves for use in pressurized cabins of aircraft to prevent excess positive and negative pressures in the cabin and to provide a means of cabin pressure release in case of emergency.
Standard

Valves, Safety, Cabin Air, General Specification For

1999-11-01
HISTORICAL
AS5379
This specification covers the general requirements for cabin air safety valves for use in pressurized cabins of aircraft to prevent excess positive and negative pressures in the cabin and to provide a means of cabin pressure release in case of emergency.
Standard

Transparent Area Washing Systems for Aircraft

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1102A
This information report presents data and recommendations pertaining to the design and development of transparent area washing systems for aircraft.
Standard

Thermodynamics of Incompressible and Compressible Fluid Flow

1989-03-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1168/1
The fluid flow treated in this section is isothermal, subsonic, and incompressible. The effects of heat addition, work on the fluid, variation in sonic velocity, and changes in elevation are neglected. An incompressible fluid is one in which a change in pressure causes no resulting change in fluid density. The assumption that liquids are incompressible introduces no appreciable error in calculations, but the assumption that a gas is incompressible introduces an error of a magnitude that is dependent on the fluid velocity and on the loss coefficient of the particular duct section or piece of equipment. Fig. 1A-1 shows the error in pressure drop resulting from assuming that air is incompressible. With reasonably small loss coefficients and the accuracy that is usually required in most calculations, compressible fluids may be treated as incompressible for velocities less than Mach 0.2.
Standard

Thermodynamics of Incompressible and Compressible Fluid Flow

2019-04-11
CURRENT
AIR1168/1A
The fluid flow treated in this section is isothermal, subsonic, and incompressible. The effects of heat addition, work on the fluid, variation in sonic velocity, and changes in elevation are neglected. An incompressible fluid is one in which a change in pressure causes no resulting change in fluid density. The assumption that liquids are incompressible introduces no appreciable error in calculations, but the assumption that a gas is incompressible introduces an error of a magnitude that is dependent on the fluid velocity and on the loss coefficient of the particular duct section or piece of equipment. Fig. 1A-1 shows the error in pressure drop resulting from assuming that air is incompressible. With reasonably small loss coefficients and the accuracy that is usually required in most calculations, compressible fluids may be treated as incompressible for velocities less than Mach 0.2.
Standard

The Control of Excess Humidity in Avionics Cooling

2010-06-17
CURRENT
ARP987B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the causes and impacts of moisture and/or condensation in avionics equipment and provides recommendations for corrective and preventative action.
Standard

The Advanced Environmental Control System (AECS) Computer Program for Steady State Analysis and Preliminary System Sizing

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1706B
Many different computer programs have been developed to determine performance capabilities of aircraft environmental control systems, and to calculate size and weight tradeoffs during preliminary design. Many of these computer programs are limited in scope to a particular arrangement of components for a specific application. General techniques, providing flexibility to handle varied types of ECS configurations and different requirements (i.e., during conceptual or preliminary design, development, testing, production, and operation) are designated “company proprietary” and are not available for industry-wide use. This document describes capabilities, limitations, and potentials of a particular computer program which provides a general ECS analysis capability, and is available for use in industry. This program, names AECS1, was developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory (References 1 and 2).
Standard

Testing of Airplane Installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS)

1999-03-01
CURRENT
ARP217D
This document deals with ground and flight test of airplane installed Environmental Control Systems (ECS), Figure 1. The ECS provide an environment, controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include the following: pressure, temperature, humidity, ventilation air velocity, ventilation rate, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and environment composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.). The ECS are composed of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply, distribute, recycle and exhaust air to maintain the desired environment.
Standard

THE ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM (AECS) COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR STEADY STATE ANALYSIS AND PRELIMINARY SYSTEM SIZING

1986-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1706A
Many different computer programs have been developed to determine performance capabilities of aircraft environmental control systems, and to calculate size and weight tradeoffs during preliminary design. Many of these computer programs are limited in scope to a particular arrangement of components for a specific application. General techniques, providing flexibility to handle varied types of ECS configurations and different requirements (i.e., during conceptual or preliminary design, development, testing, production, and operation) are designated "company proprietary" and are not available for industry-wide use. This document describes capabilities, limitations, and potentials of a particular computer program which provides a general ECS analysis capability, and is available for use in industry. This program, names AECS1, was developed under the sponsorship of the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory (References 1 and 2).
Standard

TESTING OF COMMERCIAL AIRPLANE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

1973-10-15
HISTORICAL
ARP217B
These recommendations are written to cover the testing of environmental control equipment, functioning as a complete and installed system in civil aircraft for the purpose of: a Demonstrating the safety of the installation and equipment. b Demonstrating proper functioning of the installation and equipment. c Demonstrating performance of the installation and equipment. d Obtaining data for future design and to aid in the analysis of in-service performance of the system and equipment.
Standard

TESTING OF COMMERCIAL AIRPLANE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEMS

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
ARP217C
These recommendations are written to cover the testing of environmental control equipment, functioning as a complete and installed system in civil aircraft for the purpose of: a Demonstrating the safety of the installation and equipment. b Demonstrating proper functioning of the installation and equipment. c Demonstrating performance of the installation and equipment. d Obtaining data for future design and to aid in the analysis of in-service performance of the system and equipment.
Standard

TEMPERATURE CONTROL EQUIPMENT, AUTOMATIC, AIRCRAFT COMPARTMENT

1992-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP89C
The recommendations of this ARP are primarily intended to be applicable to temperature control of compartments, occupied or unoccupied, of civil aircraft whose prime function is the transporting of passengers or cargo. The recommendations will apply, however, to a much broader category of civil and military aircraft where automatic temperature control systems are applicable.
Standard

SAE Aerospace Applied Thermodynamics Manual Aerothermodynamic Systems Engineering and Design

2019-09-24
CURRENT
AIR1168/3A
This document is one of 14 Aerospace Information Reports (AIR) of the Third Edition of the SAE Aerospace Applied Thermodynamics Manual. The manual provides a reference source for thermodynamics, aerodynamics, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and properties of materials for the aerospace industry. Procedures and equations commonly used for aerospace applications of these technologies are included.
Standard

Oil Dilution and Cold Starting of Aircraft Engines

1996-12-01
CURRENT
AIR6
This publication formalizes the applicable design concepts considered acceptable for "draw-through" cooling of electronic (avionic) equipment installed in subsonic and supersonic commercial jet transports. Methods other than draw-through cooling are covered in AIR 728A for high Mach number aircraft.
Standard

OZONE PROBLEMS IN HIGH ALTITUDE AIRCRAFT

1996-07-01
HISTORICAL
AIR910A
The purpose of this report is to provide information on ozone and its control in high altitude aircraft environmental systems. Sources of this information are listed in the selected bibliography appearing at the end of this report, to which references are made throughout.
Standard

NBC Protection Considerations for ECS Design

2014-07-01
CURRENT
AIR4362A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) protection considerations for environmental control system (ECS) design. It is intended to familiarize the ECS designer with the subject in order to know what information will be required to do an ECS design where NBC protection is a requirement. This is not intended to be a thorough discussion of NBC protection. Such a document would be large and would be classified. Topics of NBC protection that are more pertinent to the ECS designer are discussed in more detail. Those of peripheral interest, but of which the ECS designer should be aware are briefly discussed. Only radiological aspects of nuclear blast are discussed. The term CBR (Chemical, Biological, and Radiological) has been used to contrast with NBC to indicate that only the radiological aspects of a nuclear blast are being discussed.
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