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Technical Paper

Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) Piston - Design Study

2019-04-02
2019-01-0243
Variable compression ratio (VCR) technology has long been recognized as a method for improving the automobile engine performance, efficiency, fuel economy with reduced emission. This paper presents a design of hydraulically actuated piston based on the VCR piston proposed by the British Internal Combustion Engine Research Institute (BICERI). In this design, the compression height of the piston automatically changes in response to engine cylinder pressure by controlling the lubrication oil flow via valves in the piston. In addition, numerical models including piston kinetic model, oil hydraulic model, compression ratio model and etc., have been established to evaluate the piston properties. The oil flow characteristics between two chambers in VCR piston have been investigated and the response behaviors of VCR engine and normal engine, such as compression pressure and peak cylinder pressure, are compared at different engine loads.
Technical Paper

Two-Dimensional Temperature Measurements in Diesel Piston Bowl Using Phosphor Thermometry

2009-09-13
2009-24-0033
Phosphor thermometry was used during fuel injection in an optical engine with the glass piston of reentrant type. SiO2 coated phosphor particle was used for the gas-phase temperature measurements, which gave much less background signal. The measurements were performed in motored mode, in combustion mode with injection of n-heptane and in non-combustion mode with injection of iso-octane. In the beginning of injection period, the mean temperature of each injection cases was lower than that of the motored case, and temperature of iso-octane injection cases was even lower than that of n-heptane injection cases. This indicates, even if vaporization effect seemed to be the same at both injection cases, the effect of temperature decrease changed due to the chemical reaction effect for the n-heptane cases. Chemical reaction seems to be initiated outside of the fuel liquid spray and the position was moving towards the fuel rich area as the time proceeds.
Technical Paper

The Influence of a Late In-Cylinder Air Injection on In-Cylinder Flow Measured with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV)

2001-09-24
2001-01-3492
During development of an air assisted, direct injection combustion system, it was found that an air pulse during the late part of compression stroke significantly shortened the combustion duration and extended the lean limits of the engine. The effect of an injection of pure air through an air assist direct injector was studied with Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV. Results showed that an air pulse during the compression stroke significantly speeded up in-cylinder velocities, which also was showed in the heat release analysis. A system to use low density seeding particles was developed and is presented in the paper.
Technical Paper

The Importance of High-Frequency, Small-Eddy Turbulence in Spark Ignited, Premixed Engine Combustion

1995-10-01
952409
The different roles played by small and large eddies in engine combustion were studied. Experiments compared natural gas combustion in a converted, single cylinder Volvo TD 102 engine and in a 125 mm cubical cell. Turbulence is used to enhance flame growth, ideally giving better efficiency and reduced cyclic variation. Both engine and test cell results showed that flame growth rate correlated best with the level of high frequency, small eddy turbulence. The more effective, small eddy turbulence also tended to lower cyclic variations. Large scales and bulk flows convected the flame relative to cool surfaces and were most important to the initial flame kernel.
Technical Paper

The HCCI Combustion Process in a Single Cycle - Speed Fuel Tracer LIF and Chemiluminescence Imaging

2002-03-04
2002-01-0424
The Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion progress has been characterized by means of high-speed fuel tracer Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) combined with simultaneous chemiluminescence imaging. Imaging has been conducted using a high-speed laser and detector system. The system can acquire a sequence of eight images within less than one crank angle. The engine was run at 1200 rpm on iso-octane or ethanol and a slight amount of acetone was added as a fuel tracer, providing a marker for the unburned areas. The PLIF sequences showed that, during the first stage of combustion, a well distributed decay of fuel concentration occurs. During the later parts of the combustion process the fuel concentration images present much more structure, with distinct edges between islands of unburned fuel and products.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Valve Strategy on In-Cylinder Flow and Combustion

1996-02-01
960582
This study is focused on the effect of different valve strategies on the in-cylinder flow and combustion A conventional four-valve pentroof engine was modified to enable optical access to the combustion chamber To get information on the flow, a two-component LDV system was applied The combustion was monitored by the use of cylinder pressure in a one-zone heat release model The results show that the flow in the cylinder with the valves operating in the standard configuration has an expected tumble characteristic In this case the high frequency turbulence is homogeneous and has a peak approximately 20 CAD BTDC With one valve deactivated, the flow shows a swirling pattern The turbulence is then less homogeneous but the level of turbulence is increased When the single inlet valve was phased late against the crankshaft dramatic effects on the flow resulted The late inlet valve opening introduced a low cylinder pressure before the valve opened The high pressure difference across the valve introduced a high-velocity jet into the cylinder Turbulence was increased by a factor of two by this operational mode When two inlet valves were used, a reduction of turbulence resulted from a very late inlet cam phase
Technical Paper

The Effect of Transfer Port Geometry on Scavenge Flow Velocities at High Engine Speed

1996-02-01
960366
2-D LDV measurements were performed on two different cylinder designs in a fired two-stroke engine running with wide-open throttle at 9000 rpm. The cylinders examined were one with open transfer channels and one with cup handle transfer channels. Optical access to the cylinder was achieved by removing the silencer and thereby gain optical access through the exhaust port. No addition of seeding was made, since the fuel droplets were not entirely vaporized as they entered the cylinder and thus served as seeding. Results show that the loop-scavenging effect was poor with open transfer channels, but clearly detectable with cup handle channels. The RMS-value, “turbulence”, was low close to the transfer ports in both cylinders, but increased rapidly in the middle of the cylinder. The seeding density was used to obtain information about the fuel concentration in the cylinder during scavenging.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Swirl on Spark Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI)

2007-07-23
2007-01-1856
Auto ignition with SI compression ratio can be achieved by retaining hot residuals, replacing some of the fresh charge. In this experimental work it is achieved by running with a negative valve overlap (NVO) trapping hot residuals. The experimental engine is equipped with a pneumatic valve train making it possible to change valve lift, phasing and duration, as well as running with valve deactivation. This makes it possible to start in SI mode, and then by increasing the NVO, thus raising the initial charge temperature it is possible to investigate the intermediate domain between SI and HCCI. The engine is then running in spark assisted HCCI mode, or spark assisted compression ignition (SACI) mode that is an acronym that describes the combustion on the borderline between SI and HCCI. In this study the effect of changing the in-cylinder flow pattern by increased swirl is studied. This is achieved by deactivating one of the two intake valves.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Piston Topland Geometry on Emissions of Unburned Hydrocarbons from a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine

2001-05-07
2001-01-1893
The effect of crevice volumes on the emissions of unburned hydrocarbons from a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine has been experimentally investigated. By varying the size and the geometry of the largest crevice, the piston topland, it was possible to ascertain whether or not crevices are the largest source of HC. Additionally, information on quenching distances for ultra lean mixtures was obtained. The tests were performed on a single cylinder engine fuelled with iso-octane. The results showed that most of the unburned hydrocarbons descend from the crevices. Increasing the topland width to some degree lead to an increase in HC. A further increase in topland width (>1.3 mm) resulted in a reduction of HC when using mixtures richer than λ ≈ 2.8, indicating that some of the mixture trapped in the topland participates in the combustion. In conditions when combustion occurred in the topland, the HC was rather insensitive to the height of the topland.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Intake Temperature on HCCI Operation Using Negative Valve Overlap

2004-03-08
2004-01-0944
A naturally aspirated in-line six-cylinder 2.9-litre Volvo engine is operated in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode, using camshafts with low lift and short duration generating negative valve overlap. This implementation requires only minor modifications of the standard SI engine and allows SI operation outside the operating range of HCCI. Standard port fuel injection is used and pistons and cylinder head are unchanged from the automotive application. A heat exchanger is utilized to heat or cool the intake air, not as a means of combustion control but in order to simulate realistic variations in ambient temperature. The combustion is monitored in real time using cylinder pressure sensors. HCCI through negative valve overlap is recognized as one of the possible implementation strategies of HCCI closest to production. However, for a practical application the intake temperature will vary both geographically and from time to time.
Technical Paper

The Effect of In-Cylinder Flow and Turbulence on HCCI Operation

2002-10-21
2002-01-2864
The effect of in-cylinder flow and turbulence on HCCI operation has been experimentally studied by changing the combustion chamber geometry and the swirl ratio. Four different levels of turbulence were achieved, by altering the swirl ratio both for a high turbulent square bowl-in-piston combustion chamber and for a low turbulent disc combustion chamber. The swirl ratio was altered by using different inlet port designs. The results showed that the combustion chamber geometry plays a large role in HCCI combustion. With the same operating conditions, the combustion duration for the square bowl-in-piston combustion chamber was much longer compared to the disc combustion chamber. On the other hand, a moderate change in swirl ratio proved to have only modest effect on the combustion process. With early combustion timing, the gross indicated efficiency was higher when the square bowl-in-piston combustion chamber.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Fuel Volatility on HCCI Using Simultaneous Formaldehyde and OH PLIF

2004-10-25
2004-01-2948
Simultaneous formaldehyde and OH PLIF have been applied in a direct-injected HCCI engine. The engine is a 0.5 l single-cylinder optical engine equipped with EGR system. PLIF measurements were performed with the engine run with two different fuels of low and high volatility, respectively. Different ratios of EGR were also examined. The aim of the study was to investigate how fuels with different volatility and EGR affect the HCCI combustion and measurements were performed for early and late injection timings. Measurements are presented for different injection timings showing formaldehyde and OH from start of injection until late in the expansion stroke. Also, formaldehyde distributions obtained from after the low temperature regime and before the high temperature regime are studied for different tuning of the start of injection from 300CAD to 20CAD before top dead center.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Combustion Chamber Geometry on HCCI Operation

2002-03-04
2002-01-0425
The effect of the combustion chamber geometry and the turbulence on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) operation has been experimentally investigated. A high turbulent square bowl in piston combustion chamber has been compared with a low turbulent disc combustion chamber. The results showed that the combustion chamber geometry plays large role for HCCI combustion. At the same operating conditions, the peak combustion rate for the square bowl combustion chamber was much lower compared to the disc combustion chamber. The combustion duration was in some cases almost a factor two longer for the square bowl combustion chamber. The lower combustion rate with the square bowl was due larger heat losses, lower combustion efficiency and higher turbulence.
Technical Paper

Supercharged Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) with Exhaust Gas Recirculation and Pilot Fuel

2000-06-19
2000-01-1835
In an attempt to extend the upper load limit for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), supercharging in combination with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) have been applied. Two different boost pressures were used, 1.1 bar and 1.5 bar. High EGR rates were used in order to reduce the combustion rate. The highest obtained IMEP was 16 bar. This was achieved with the higher boost pressure, at close to stoichiometric conditions and with approximately 50 % EGR. Natural gas was used as the main fuel. In the case with the higher boost pressure, iso-octane was used as pilot fuel, to improve the ignition properties of the mixture. This made it possible to use a lower compression ratio and thereby reducing the maximum cylinder pressure. The tests were performed on a single cylinder engine operated at low speed (1000 rpm). The test engine was equipped with a modified cylinder head, having a Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) mechanism.
Technical Paper

Study on Combustion Chamber Geometry Effects in an HCCI Engine Using High-Speed Cycle-Resolved Chemiluminescence Imaging

2007-04-16
2007-01-0217
The aim of this study is to see how geometry generated turbulence affects the Rate of Heat Release (ROHR) in an HCCI engine. HCCI combustion is limited in load due to high peak pressures and too fast combustion. If the speed of combustion can be decreased the load range can be extended. Therefore two different combustion chamber geometries were investigated, one with a disc shape and one with a square bowl in piston. The later one provokes squish-generated gas flow into the bowl causing turbulence. The disc shaped combustion chamber was used as a reference case. Combustion duration and ROHR were studied using heat release analysis. A Scania D12 Diesel engine, converted to port injected HCCI with ethanol was used for the experiments. An engine speed of 1200 rpm was applied throughout the tests. The effect of air/fuel ratio and combustion phasing was also studied.
Technical Paper

Spray and Combustion Visualization of Gasoline and Diesel under Different Ambient Conditions in a Constant Volume Chamber

2013-10-14
2013-01-2547
Spray and combustion of gasoline and diesel were visualized under different ambient conditions in terms of pressure, temperature and density in a constant volume chamber. Three different ambient conditions were selected to simulate the three combustion regimes of homogeneous charge compression ignition, premixed charge compression ignition and conventional combustion. Ambient density was varied from 3.74 to 23.39 kg/m3. Ambient temperature at the spray injection were controlled to the range from 474 to 925 K. Intake oxygen concentration was also modulated from 15 % to 21 % in order to investigate the effects of intake oxygen concentrations on combustion characteristics. The injection pressure of gasoline and diesel were modulated from 50 to 150 MPa to analyze the effect of injection pressure on the spray development and combustion characteristics. Liquid penetration length and vapor penetration length were measured based on the methods of Mie-scattering and Schileren, respectively.
Technical Paper

Simultaneous PLIF Measurements for Visualization of Formaldehyde- and Fuel- Distributions in a DI HCCI Engine

2005-10-24
2005-01-3869
Simultaneous laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging of formaldehyde and a fuel-tracer have been performed in a direct-injection HCCI engine. A mix of N-heptane and iso-octane was used as fuel and Toluene as fluorescent tracer. The experimental setup involves two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers and two ICCD cameras. Frequency quadrupled laser radiation at 266 nm from one of the Nd:YAG lasers was used for excitation of the fuel tracer. The resulting fluorescence was detected with one of the ICCD cameras in the spectral region 270-320 nm. The second laser system provided frequency tripled radiation at 355 nm for excitation of Formaldehyde. Detection in the range 395-500 nm was achieved with the second ICCD. The aim of the presented work is to investigate the applicability of utilizing formaldehyde as a naturally occurring fuel marker. Formaldehyde is formed in the low temperature reactions (LTR) prior to the main combustion and should thus be present were fuel is located until it is consumed.
Technical Paper

Simultaneous Formaldehyde and Fuel-Tracer LIF Imaging in a High-Speed Diesel Engine With Optically Accessible Realistic Combustion Chamber

2005-09-11
2005-24-008
Simultaneous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging of formaldehyde and a fuel-tracer have been performed in a high-speed diesel engine. N-heptane and isooctane were used as fuel and toluene was used as a tracer. This arrangement made it possible to make simultaneous measurements of toluene by exciting at 266 nm and detecting at 270-320 nm while exciting formaldehyde at 355 nm and detecting at 400-500 nm. The aim of this study is to investigate how traditional fuel tracer and natural-occurring formaldehyde formed in the cool chemistry are transported in the piston bowl. A range of ignition delays were created by running the engine with different amounts of EGR. During this sweep the area where the low-temperature reactions take place were studied. The measurements were performed in a 0.5-l, single-cylinder optical engine running under conditions simulating a cruise-point, i.e., about 2.2 bar imep.
Journal Article

Sensitivity Analysis Study on Ethanol Partially Premixed Combustion

2013-04-08
2013-01-0269
Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is a combustion concept which aims to provide combustion with low smoke and NOx with high thermal efficiency. Extending the ignition delay to enhance the premixing, avoiding spray-driven combustion and controlling the combustion temperature at an optimum level through use of suitable lambda and EGR levels have been recognized as key factors to achieve such a combustion. Fuels with high ignitability resistance have been proven to be a useful to extend the ignition delay. In this work pure ethanol has been used as a PPC fuel. The objective of this research was initially to investigate the required operating conditions for PPC with ethanol. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis was performed to understand how the required parameters for ethanol PPC such as lambda, EGR rate, injection pressure and inlet temperature influence the combustion in terms of controllability, stability, emissions (i.e.
Technical Paper

Reacting Boundary Layers in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine

2001-03-05
2001-01-1032
An experimental and computational study of the near-wall combustion in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine has been conducted by applying laser based diagnostic techniques in combination with numerical modeling. Our major intent was to characterize the combustion in the velocity- and thermal boundary layers. The progress of the combustion was studied by using fuel tracer LIF, the result of which was compared with LDA measurements of the velocity boundary layer along with numerical simulations of the reacting boundary layer. Time resolved images of the PLIF signal were taken and ensemble averaged images were calculated. In the fuel tracer LIF experiments, acetone was seeded into the fuel as a tracer. It is clear from the experiments that a proper set of backgrounds and laser profiles are necessary to resolve the near-wall concentration profiles, even at a qualitative level.
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