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Journal Article

Unsteady Aerodynamic Properties of a Vehicle Model and their Effect on Driver and Vehicle under Side Wind Conditions

2011-04-12
2011-01-0154
In this paper the effect of aerodynamic modifications that influence the unsteady aerodynamic properties of a vehicle on the response of the closed loop system driver-vehicle under side wind conditions is investigated. In today's aerodynamic optimization the side wind sensitivity of a vehicle is determined from steady state values measured in the wind tunnel. There, the vehicle is rotated with respect to the wind tunnel flow to create an angle of attack. In this approach however, the gustiness that is inherent in natural wind is not reproduced. Further, unsteady forces and moments acting on the vehicle are not measured due to the limited dynamic response of the commonly used wind tunnel balances. Therefore, a new method is introduced, overcoming the shortcomings of the current steady state approach. The method consists of the reproduction of the properties of natural stochastic crosswind that are essential for the determination of the side wind sensitivity of a vehicle.
Technical Paper

The New 5-Belt Road Simulation System of the IVK Wind Tunnels - Design and First Results

2003-03-03
2003-01-0429
In 2001 the FKFS (Research Institute of Automotive Engineering and Vehicle Engines, Stuttgart) took into operation state-of-the-art 5-belt systems for road simulation in the 22.45m2-IVK automotive wind tunnel and in the 1.65m2-IVK model wind tunnel. In these systems, a narrow belt running between the vehicles' wheels is fitted with 4 balance-mounted wheel rotation drives and a vehicle restraint system. The FKFS opted for MTS steel belt technology due to its small size, low power requirements and excellent tracking stability. Due to air bearings below the belt, the flat-belt wheel rotation units in the full-scale wind tunnel permit aerodynamic force measurements at full wheel load (8 kN) up to 70 m/s. In combination with the hydrostatic suspension of the units, integrated longitudinal force transducers permit realistic measurements of the wheels' rolling resistance. In the model wind tunnel FKFS wheel rotation units with Poly-V belts are used with small wheel loads up to 80 m/s.
Technical Paper

The Lattice-Boltzmann-VLES Method for Automotive Fluid Dynamics Simulation, a Review

2009-01-21
2009-26-0057
The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has been successfully used in conjunction with a Very Large-Eddy Simulation (VLES) turbulence modeling approach for over a decade for the accurate prediction of automotive fluid dynamics. Its success lies in the unique underlying physics that is significantly different from traditional computational fluid dynamics methods. In this paper, we provide a complete description of the method followed by a set of examples which show its use in the automotive industry. We will first provide a review of the physics and numerical methods. Here the LB method and its relationship to kinetic theory and the Navier-Stokes equations will be briefly discussed. We will summarize the strengths of LB method, especially for the solution of transient flows in extremely complex geometries. The VLES turbulence modeling method will be presented next, as well as how VLES neatly fits into the LB framework.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Rotating Wheels on Total Road Load

2007-04-16
2007-01-1047
Within in the scope of a road load investigation project at FKFS, the influence of rotating wheels on the road load of a passenger car was investigated. For this purpose an approach was developed to measure the ventilation resistance of a spinning wheel. This approach enables a comparison of different wheel sizes and rim designs. Together with aerodynamic drag measurements in the wind tunnel it is possible to evaluate different wheel configurations with respect to their contribution to the road load. The measuring approach and results of performed measurements are shown in this paper.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Ground Simulation and Wheel Rotation on Aerodynamic Drag Optimization - Potential for Reducing Fuel Consumption

1996-02-01
960672
In automobile development, wind tunnel measurements are used to optimize fuel consumption and the vehicle's road behavior. The classic measuring technique is based on a stationary vehicle set up in the wind tunnel with stationary wheels. Relative movement between vehicle and road surface is therefore ignored. In more recent studies, measurements have been taken with improved ground simulation. For example, a belt is used instead of the stationary wind tunnel floor and the car wheels rotate. Ground simulation using a belt and rotating wheels generally leads to a reduction in flow angularity at the front wheels, in the same way as blocking the cooling air flow, whereby, as a matter of fact, the aerodynamic drag is reduced. Analogous air flow angle correlations can be established for the effect of underfloor panels.
Journal Article

The Bandwidth of Transient Yaw Effects on Vehicle Aerodynamics

2011-04-12
2011-01-0160
A vehicle on the road encounters an unsteady flow due to turbulence in the natural wind, the unsteady wakes from other vehicles and as a result of traversing through the stationary wakes of road side obstacles. There is increasing concern about potential differences in aerodynamic behaviour measured in steady flow wind tunnel conditions and that which occurs for vehicles on the road. It is possible to introduce turbulence into the wind tunnel environment (e.g. by developing active turbulence generators) but on-road turbulence is wide ranging in terms of both its intensity and frequency and it would be beneficial to better understand what aspects of the turbulence are of greatest importance to the aerodynamic performance of vehicles. There has been significant recent work on the characterisation of turbulent airflow relevant to road vehicles. The simulation of this time-varying airflow is now becoming possible in wind tunnels and in CFD.
Technical Paper

The Aerodynamic Development of the Tesla Model S - Part 2: Wheel Design Optimization

2012-04-16
2012-01-0178
Aerodynamic efficiency plays an increasingly important role in the automotive industry, as the push for increased fuel economy becomes a larger factor in the engineering and design process. Longitudinal drag is used as the primary measure of aerodynamic performance, usually cited as the coefficient of drag (CD). This drag is created mostly by the body shape of the vehicle, but the wheel and tire system also contributes a significant portion. In addition to the longitudinal drag created by the body and wheels, rotational drag can add an appreciable amount of aerodynamic resistance to the vehicle as well. Reducing power consumption is an especially vital aspect in electric vehicle (EV) design. As the world's first luxury electric sedan, the Tesla Model S combines a premium driving experience with an electric drivetrain package that allows for unique solutions to many vehicle subsystems.
Technical Paper

The Aerodynamic Development of the Tesla Model S - Part 1: Overview

2012-04-16
2012-01-0177
The Tesla Motors Model S has been designed from a clean sheet of paper to prove that no compromises to a desirable aesthetic style and world class driving experience are necessary in order to be energy efficient. Aerodynamic optimization is a major contributor to the overall efficiency of an electric vehicle and the close integration of the Design and Engineering groups at Tesla Motors was specifically arranged to process design iterations quickly and enable the fully informed development of the exterior surfaces at a very rapid pace. Clear communication and a working appreciation of each other's priorities were vital to this collaboration and underpinning this was extensive use of the powerful analysis and visualization capabilities of CFD. CFD was used to identify and effectively communicate the nature of beneficial and detrimental design features and to find ways to enhance or ameliorate them accordingly.
Journal Article

Subjective Perception and Evaluation of Driving Dynamics in the Virtual Test Drive

2017-03-28
2017-01-1564
In addition to the analysis of human driving behavior or the development of new advanced driver assistance systems, the high simulation quality of today’s driving simulators enables investigations of selected topics pertaining to driving dynamics. With high reproducibility and fast generation of vehicle variants the subjective evaluation process leads to a better system understanding in the early development stages. The transfer of the original on-road test run to the virtual reality of the driving simulator includes the full flexibility of the vehicle model, the maneuver and the test track, which allows new possibilities of investigation. With the opportunity of a realistic whole-vehicle simulation provided by the Stuttgart Driving Simulator new analysis of the human’s thresholds of perception are carried out.
Journal Article

Simulation of Rear Glass and Body Side Vehicle Soiling by Road Sprays

2011-04-12
2011-01-0173
Numerical simulation of aerodynamics for vehicle development is used to meet a wide range of performance targets, including aerodynamic drag for fuel efficiency, cooling flow rates, and aerodynamic lift for vehicle handling. The aerodynamic flow field can also be used to compute the advection of small particles such as water droplets, dust, dirt, sand, etc., released into the flow domain, including the effects of mass, gravity, and the forces acting on the particles by the airflow. Previous efforts in this topic have considered the water sprays ejected by rotating wheels when driving on a wet road. The road spray carries dirt particles and can obscure the side and rear glazing. In this study, road sprays are considered in which the effects of additional water droplets resulting from splashing and dripping of particles from the wheel house and rear under body are added to help understand the patterns of dirt film accumulation on the side glass and rear glass.
Technical Paper

Robust Optimization for Real World CO2 Reduction

2018-05-30
2018-37-0015
Ground transportation industry contributes to about 14% of the global CO2 emissions. Therefore, any effort in reducing global CO2 needs to include the design of cleaner and more energy efficient vehicles. Their design needs to be optimized for the real-world conditions. Using wind tunnels that can only reproduce idealized conditions quite often does not translate into real-world on-road CO2 reduction and improved energy efficiency. Several recent studies found that very rarely can the real-world environment be represented by turbulence-free conditions simulated in wind tunnels. The real-world conditions consist of both transversal flow velocity component (causing an oncoming yaw flow) as well as large-scale turbulent fluctuations, with length scales of up to many times the size of a vehicle. The study presented in this paper shows how the realistic wind affects the aerodynamics of the vehicle.
Technical Paper

Road Load Determination Based on Driving-Torque-Measurement

2003-03-03
2003-01-0933
This paper introduces a driving-torque measurement method for the determination of vehicle road load and its components. To increase the accuracy, the torque measurements are combined with rolling resistance measurements performed with a specially developed trailer. This method is a strictly experimental approach and does not use any mathematical models. The experimental techniques are described as well as the proceedings to compare test stand and road measurements. The results that are shown prove that this method is suitable for the investigation of single road load components. Furthermore, the comparison of different rolling resistance measurement devices shows the potential of the measurement trailer and the necessity to perform rolling resistance measurements on real road surfaces and not solely on test stands.
Journal Article

Rating Mass-related Energy Demand for Vehicles with New Powertrain Concepts

2011-06-09
2011-37-0010
The combination of enhanced powertrains and adapted vehicle concepts can reduce the energy demand of vehicles significantly, especially when energy conversion efficiency rises and at the same time driving resistances decrease. In addition, new powertrain concepts are able to offer extra functionality due to a growing cross-linking with chassis and vehicle body. The design of highly linked vehicles and powertrain systems requires additional new development methods in order to answer interacting questions of driving dynamics and vehicle energy efficiency at an early stage of development. In the paper a database-based simulation platform is presented which was developed at the IVK of the University of Stuttgart in cooperation with the Research Institute of Automotive Engineering and Vehicle Engines Stuttgart (FKFS). The simulation platform is used as an example to discuss mass reducing developments for various powertrain concepts.
Journal Article

Numerical Comparison of Rolling Road Systems

2011-06-09
2011-37-0017
The entire automotive industry is moving towards lower CO₂ emissions and higher energy efficiency. Especially for higher driving speeds this can be achieved by minimizing aerodynamic drag. Additionally, aerodynamic downforce is essential to maintain or even improve the handling performance of a vehicle. In order to optimize the vehicle's aerodynamic efficiency in wind tunnel tests, the boundary conditions of a vehicle driving on a road must be simulated properly. Particularly for optimizing the underbody region of a vehicle, ground simulation is an important issue in every wind tunnel. Today rolling road systems featuring one or more moving belts on the wind tunnel floor are a standard tool to simulate the complex boundary condition of a vehicle driving on the road. But generally the technical effort to measure aerodynamic forces accurately increases with improvement of the aerodynamic ground simulation.
Journal Article

New Motion Cueing Algorithm for Improved Evaluation of Vehicle Dynamics on a Driving Simulator

2017-03-28
2017-01-1566
In recent years, driving simulators have become a valuable tool in the automotive design and testing process. Yet, in the field of vehicle dynamics, most decisions are still based on test drives in real cars. One reason for this situation can be found in the fact that many driving simulators do not allow the driver to evaluate the handling qualities of a simulated vehicle. In a driving simulator, the motion cueing algorithm tries to represent the vehicle motion within the constrained motion envelope of the motion platform. By nature, this process leads to so called false cues where the motion of the platform is not in phase or moving in a different direction with respect to the vehicle motion. In a driving simulator with classical filter-based motion cueing, false cues make it considerably more difficult for the driver to rate vehicle dynamics.
Journal Article

Modelling A-Pillar Water Overflow: Developing CFD and Experimental Methods

2012-04-16
2012-01-0588
Water accumulating on a vehicle's wind screen, driven over the A-pillar by a combination of aerodynamic forces and the action of the windscreen wipers, can be a significant impediment to driver vision. Surface water film, or streams, persisting in key vision areas of the side glass can impair the drivers' ability to see clearly through to the door mirror, and laterally onto junctions. Common countermeasures include: water management channels and hydrophobic glass coatings. Water management channels have both design and wind noise implications. Hydrophobic coatings entail significant cost. In order to manage this design optimisation issue a water film and wiper effect model has been developed in collaboration with Jaguar Land Rover, extending the capabilities of the PowerFLOW CFD software. This is complimented by a wind-tunnel based test method for development and validation. The paper presents the progress made to date.
Technical Paper

Model Scale Based Process for the Development of Aerodynamic Tire Characteristics

2014-04-01
2014-01-0585
The geometric shape of the tires can have a large influence on the aerodynamic drag of a passenger car as it has been shown already in different publications like for example [1, 2, 3]. However, to optimize the shape of a tire, nowadays quite some effort is needed in terms of wind tunnel time and costs for prototype tires. In this paper an approach to optimize the tire's shape in model scale is described, which can help to reduce both development time and costs. The first step in the development of this method was to verify that the aerodynamic effects of the tire geometry in model scale are comparable to full scale tests. This was achieved by measuring different production tires in full scale and also by measuring the quarter scale version of the same tires. The only difference between the original and the model scale tires was that the scaled tires were not deformable. The results show that the difference between two sets of tires is comparable in full scale and in quarter scale.
Technical Paper

Investigations in a Cooling Air Flow System under the Influence of Road Simulation

2008-04-14
2008-01-0796
This paper presents some recent results concerning the generation and minimization of cooling air drag, achieved in an integrated approach of numerical and experimental investigations. The baseline configuration of a production cars' cooling air flow system is analyzed. The analysis of the created drag shows, that most of the force changes due to the cooling air flow appear in the front region of the vehicle. However, the forces generated by heat exchangers are only a small share of the total changes. Additional drag is generated for example by the front wheels and by the components of the underhood compartment. The investigation of the influence of the vehicle rear end shape on the aerodynamics of the cooling air flow system shows, that two similar cars with different rear end shapes (notchback and squareback) can feature different cooling air drag values.
Journal Article

Investigation of Aerodynamic Drag in Turbulent Flow Conditions

2016-04-05
2016-01-1605
In this paper the influence of different turbulent flow conditions on the aerodynamic drag of a quarter scale model with notchback and estate back rear ends is investigated. FKFS swing® (Side Wind Generator) is used to generate a turbulent flow field in the test section of the IVK model scale wind tunnel. In order to investigate the increase in drag with increasing yaw, a steady state yaw sweep is performed for both vehicle models. The shape of the drag curves vary for each vehicle model. The notchback model shows a more pronounced drag minimum at 0° yaw angle and experiences a more severe increase in drag at increasing yaw when compared to the estate back model. Unsteady time averaged aerodynamic drag values are obtained at two flow situations with different turbulent length scales, turbulence intensities, and yaw angle amplitudes. While the first one is representing light wind, the second one is recreating the presence of strong gusty wind.
Journal Article

Integrated Numerical and Experimental Approach to Determine the Cooling Air Mass Flow in Different Vehicle Development Stages

2010-04-12
2010-01-0287
This paper presents an integrated numerical and experimental approach to take best possible advantage of the common development tools at hand (1D, CFD and wind tunnel) to determine the cooling air mass flow at the different vehicle development stages. 1D tools can be used early in development when neither 3D data nor wind tunnel models with detailed underhood flow are available. A problem that has to be resolved is the dependency on input data. In particular, the pressure coefficients on the outer surface (i.e. at the air inlet and outlet region) and the pressure loss data of single components are of great importance since the amount of cooling air flow is directly linked to these variables. The pressure coefficients at the air inlet and outlet are not only a function of vehicle configuration but also of driving velocity and fan operation. Both, static and total pressure coefficient, yield different advantages and disadvantages and can therefore both be used as boundary conditions.
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