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Standard

Twin Engine Helicopter Power Requirements

1997-06-01
CURRENT
AIR1850A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) defines the power spectrum during normal and emergency operations of a twin engine helicopter and thereby postulates suitable power plant rating structures. This document does not address the power requirements for single engine helicopters or those with more than two engines.
Standard

The Effect of Installation Power Losses on the Overall Performance of a Helicopter

2005-06-07
CURRENT
AIR5642
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to illustrate the effect of installation power losses on the performance of a helicopter. Installation power losses result from a variety of sources, some associated directly with the basic engine installation, and some coming from the installation of specific items of aircraft mission specific equipment. Close attention must be paid to the accurate measurement of these losses so that the correct aircraft performance is calculated. Installation power losses inevitably result in a reduction in the overall performance of the aircraft. In some cases, careful attention to detail will allow specific elements of the overall loss to be reduced with immediate benefit for the mission performance of the aircraft. When considering items of equipment that affect the engine, it is important to understand the effect these will have on overall aircraft performance to ensure that mission capability is not unduly compromised.
Standard

Helicopter Power Assurance

1997-06-01
CURRENT
AIR4083A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) defines helicopter turboshaft engine power assurance theory and methods. Several inflight power assurance example procedures are presented. These procedures vary from a very simple method used on some normal category civil helicopters, to the more complex methods involving trend monitoring and rolling average techniques. The latter method can be used by small operators but is generally better suited to the larger operator with computerized maintenance record capability.
Standard

Helicopter Mission Definition

1982-11-01
CURRENT
ARP1352
The purpose of this recommended practice is to establish a standard format for the presentation of helicopter mission data, which will provide data required to establish airframe and/or engine component life.
Standard

Helicopter FUEL Economy Evaluation

1978-02-01
CURRENT
AS1516
The purpose of this standard is to provide a method of evaluating helicopter fuel economy which accounts for the significant technical variables in helicopter and powerplant design.
Standard

Helicopter Engine/Airframe Interface Document and Checklist

1997-06-01
CURRENT
ARP1507A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides a guide for the preparation of a Helicopter Engine/Airframe Interface Document and Checklist. This document and checklist is intended to provide complete relevant information on the characteristics, performance, and engine interfaces. Of most importance is the identification of the data and the location of data to assure that the engine manufacturer and the airframe manufacturer supply information that can be easily located by either manufacturer.
Standard

Helicopter Engine-Rotor System Compatibility

1997-05-01
CURRENT
ARP704A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) recommends a methodology to be used for the design, analysis and test evaluation of modern helicopter gas turbine propulsion system stability and transient response characteristics. This methodology utilizes the computational power of modern digital computers to more thoroughly analyze, simulate and bench-test the helicopter engine/rotor system speed control loop over the flight envelope. This up-front work results in significantly less effort expended during flight test and delivers a more effective system into service. The methodology presented herein is recommended for modern digital electronic propulsion control systems and also for traditional analog and hydromechanical systems.
Standard

Helicopter Engine Foreign Object Damage

2019-01-28
WIP
AIR4096A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report is to disseminate qualitative information regarding foreign object damage (FOD) to gas turbine engines used to power helicopters and to discuss methods of preventing FOD. Although turbine-powered, fixed-wing aircraft are also subject to FOD, the unique ability of the helicopter to hover above, takeoff from, and land on unprepared areas creates a special need for a separate treatment of this subject as applied to rotary-winged aircraft.
Standard

HELICOPTER ENGINE FOREIGN OBJECT DAMAGE

1989-11-30
CURRENT
AIR4096
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report is to disseminate qualitative information regarding foreign object damage (FOD) to gas turbine engines used to power helicopters and to discuss methods of preventing FOD. Although turbine-powered, fixed-wing aircraft are also subject to FOD, the unique ability of the helicopter to hover above, takeoff from, and land on unprepared areas creates a special need for a separate treatment of this subject as applied to rotary-winged aircraft.
Standard

Engine Erosion Protection

1971-02-01
CURRENT
AIR947
This Aerospace Information Report deals with protection of helicopter aircraft engines against erosion. Applicability is restricted to aircraft having a disc loading of less than 15 pounds per square foot.
Standard

EVALUATION OF HELICOPTER TURBINE ENGINE LINEAR VIBRATION ENVIRONMENT

1992-03-01
CURRENT
AIR1289A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) outlines a recommended procedure for evaluation of the vibration environment to which the gas turbine engine powerplant is subjected in the helicopter installation. This analysis of engine vibration is normally demonstrated on a one-time basis upon initial certification, or after a major modification, of an engine/helicopter configuration. This AIR deals with linear vibration as measured on the basic case structure of the engine and not, for example, torsional vibration in drive shafting or vibration of a component within the engine such as a compressor or turbine airfoil. In summary, this AIR discusses the engine manufacturer’s "Installation Test Code" aspects of engine vibration and proposes an appropriate measurement method.
Standard

ENGINE EXHAUST SYSTEM DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR ROTORCRAFT

1989-10-01
CURRENT
ARP4056
Turbine engines installed in rotorcraft have an exhaust system that is designed and produced by the aircraft manufacturer. The primary function of the exhaust system is to direct hot exhaust gases away from the airframe. The exhaust system may consist of a tailpipe, which is attached to the engine, and an exhaust fairing, which is part of the rotorcraft. The engine manufacturer specifies a baseline "referee" tailpipe design, and guaranteed engine performance is based upon the use of the referee tailpipe and tailpipe exit diameter. The configuration used on the rotocraft may differ from the referee tailpipe, but it is intended to minimize additional losses attributed to the installation. This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes the physical, functional, and performance interfaces to be considered in the design of the aircraft exhaust system.
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