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Technical Paper

Study of Supercharged Gasoline HCCI Combustion by Using Spectroscopic Measurements and FT-IR Exhaust Gas Analysis

2014-11-11
2014-32-0004
One issue of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines that should be addressed is to suppress rapid combustion in the high-load region. Supercharging the intake air so as to form a leaner mixture is one way of moderating HCCI combustion. However, the specific effect of supercharging on moderating HCCI combustion and the mechanism involved are not fully understood yet. Therefore, experiments were conducted in this study that were designed to moderate rapid combustion in a test HCCI engine by supercharging the air inducted into the cylinder. The engine was operated under high-load levels in a supercharged state in order to make clear the effect of supercharging on expanding the stable operating region in the high-load range. HCCI combustion was investigated under these conditions by making in-cylinder spectroscopic measurements and by analyzing the exhaust gas using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy.
Journal Article

Studies on the Effect of In-Cylinder Charge Stratifications on High Load HCCI Combustion

2016-11-08
2016-32-0010
The objective of this article is to clarify the effect of thermal and equivalence ratio stratification on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion under several conditions with three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD). Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation was used to calculate in-cylinder fluid dynamics. The 3D CFD simulation is also coupled with detailed chemical reaction to calculate HCCI combustion. First, the study with a simple engine model reveals that thermal stratification is more effective for prolonged combustion duration, which is a key factor for a high load limit of HCCI combustion, than equivalence ratio stratification. Thermal stratification has two-stage combustion: the combustion propagates from hot region slowly at first and then ignites in the entire in-cylinder region. Owing to this phenomenon, thermal stratification is more effective to mitigate HCCI combustion.
Technical Paper

Simultaneous Analysis of Light Absorption and Emission in Preflame Reactions under Knocking Operation

2000-01-15
2000-01-1416
The study deals with the light absorption and emission behavior in the preflame reaction interval before hot flame reactions.(1-3) Absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the behavior of HCHO and OH radicals during a progression from normal combustion to knocking operation. Emission spectroscopic measurements were obtained in the same way that radical added HCO. Radical behavior in preflame reactions was thus examined on the basis of simultaneous measurements, which combined each absorption wavelength with three emission wavelength by using a monochromator and a newly developed polychromator.(4-5) When n-heptane (0 RON) and blended fuel (50 RON) were used as test fuel, it was observed that radical behavior differed between normal combustion and knocking operation and a duration of the preflame reaction was shorter during the progression from normal combustion to a condition of knocking.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Numerical Study of HCCI Combustion using Cooled EGR

2015-11-17
2015-32-0770
Unresolved issues of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion include an extremely rapid pressure rise on the high load side and resultant knocking. Studies conducted to date have examined ways of expanding the region of stable HCCI combustion on the high load side such as by applying supercharging or recirculating exhaust gas (EGR). However, the effect of applying EGR gas to supercharged HCCI combustion and the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. In this study, the effect of EGR gas components on HCCI combustion was investigated by conducting experiments in which external EGR gas was applied to supercharged HCCI combustion and also experiments in which nitrogen (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were individually injected into the intake air pipe to simulate EGR gas components. In addition, HCCI combustion reactions were analyzed by conducting chemical kinetic simulations under the same conditions as those of the experiments.
Journal Article

A Study of Supercharged HCCI Combustion using In-cylinder Spectroscopic Techniques and Chemical Kinetic Calculation

2013-10-15
2013-32-9171
A great deal of interest is focused on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion today as a combustion system enabling internal combustion engines to attain higher efficiency and cleaner exhaust emissions. Because the air-fuel mixture is compression-ignited in an HCCI engine, control of the ignition timing is a key issue. Additionally, because the mixture ignites simultaneously at multiple locations in the combustion chamber, it is necessary to control the resultant rapid combustion, especially in the high-load region. Supercharging can be cited as one approach that is effective in facilitating high-load operation of HCCI engines. Supercharging increases the intake air quantity to increase the heat capacity of the working gas, thereby lowering the combustion temperature for injection of the same quantity of fuel. In this study, experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of supercharging on combustion characteristics in an HCCI engine.
Technical Paper

A Spectroscopic Analysis of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine

2007-10-30
2007-32-0038
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion offers the advantages of high efficiency and low emissions of pollutants. However, ignition timing control and expansion of the stable operation region are issues remaining to be addressed in this combustion process. Detailed analyses of ignition and combustion characteristics are needed to resolve these issues. HCCI combustion of a low octane number fuel is characterized by two-stage heat release attributed to a cool flame and a hot flame, respectively. In this study, spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the effect of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on ignition and combustion characteristics using a low octane number fuel, which is apt to give rise to a cool flame. The reaction mechanism of a cool flame produces formaldehyde (HCHO). Measurements were made of spontaneous light emission and absorption at wavelengths corresponding to the light emitted at the time HCHO was produced.
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