Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 10 of 10
Journal Article

The Effects of Cooling Air on the Flow Field around a Vehicle

2016-04-05
2016-01-1603
Cooling air flow is an important factor when it comes to vehicle performance and operating safety. In addition, it is closely linked to vehicle aerodynamics. In recent years more and more effort is being spent to optimize the losses generated by the flow through the vehicle. Grille shutters, better sealing and ducting are only some examples for innovations in this field of work, resulting in a lower contribution of the cooling air flow to overall drag. But cooling air not only affects the internal flow of the vehicle but also changes the flow around it. This paper will show changes in the flow field around the generic DrivAer model resulting from cooling air flow, especially in the wake behind the car and in the region around the front wheels. The results were gathered using PIV measurements, multi-hole-probe measurements and pitot tube measurements in the 1:4 model scale wind tunnel of IVK University of Stuttgart.
Journal Article

Numerical Comparison of Rolling Road Systems

2011-06-09
2011-37-0017
The entire automotive industry is moving towards lower CO₂ emissions and higher energy efficiency. Especially for higher driving speeds this can be achieved by minimizing aerodynamic drag. Additionally, aerodynamic downforce is essential to maintain or even improve the handling performance of a vehicle. In order to optimize the vehicle's aerodynamic efficiency in wind tunnel tests, the boundary conditions of a vehicle driving on a road must be simulated properly. Particularly for optimizing the underbody region of a vehicle, ground simulation is an important issue in every wind tunnel. Today rolling road systems featuring one or more moving belts on the wind tunnel floor are a standard tool to simulate the complex boundary condition of a vehicle driving on the road. But generally the technical effort to measure aerodynamic forces accurately increases with improvement of the aerodynamic ground simulation.
Technical Paper

Model Scale Based Process for the Development of Aerodynamic Tire Characteristics

2014-04-01
2014-01-0585
The geometric shape of the tires can have a large influence on the aerodynamic drag of a passenger car as it has been shown already in different publications like for example [1, 2, 3]. However, to optimize the shape of a tire, nowadays quite some effort is needed in terms of wind tunnel time and costs for prototype tires. In this paper an approach to optimize the tire's shape in model scale is described, which can help to reduce both development time and costs. The first step in the development of this method was to verify that the aerodynamic effects of the tire geometry in model scale are comparable to full scale tests. This was achieved by measuring different production tires in full scale and also by measuring the quarter scale version of the same tires. The only difference between the original and the model scale tires was that the scaled tires were not deformable. The results show that the difference between two sets of tires is comparable in full scale and in quarter scale.
Technical Paper

Investigations in a Cooling Air Flow System under the Influence of Road Simulation

2008-04-14
2008-01-0796
This paper presents some recent results concerning the generation and minimization of cooling air drag, achieved in an integrated approach of numerical and experimental investigations. The baseline configuration of a production cars' cooling air flow system is analyzed. The analysis of the created drag shows, that most of the force changes due to the cooling air flow appear in the front region of the vehicle. However, the forces generated by heat exchangers are only a small share of the total changes. Additional drag is generated for example by the front wheels and by the components of the underhood compartment. The investigation of the influence of the vehicle rear end shape on the aerodynamics of the cooling air flow system shows, that two similar cars with different rear end shapes (notchback and squareback) can feature different cooling air drag values.
Journal Article

Investigation of Aerodynamic Drag in Turbulent Flow Conditions

2016-04-05
2016-01-1605
In this paper the influence of different turbulent flow conditions on the aerodynamic drag of a quarter scale model with notchback and estate back rear ends is investigated. FKFS swing® (Side Wind Generator) is used to generate a turbulent flow field in the test section of the IVK model scale wind tunnel. In order to investigate the increase in drag with increasing yaw, a steady state yaw sweep is performed for both vehicle models. The shape of the drag curves vary for each vehicle model. The notchback model shows a more pronounced drag minimum at 0° yaw angle and experiences a more severe increase in drag at increasing yaw when compared to the estate back model. Unsteady time averaged aerodynamic drag values are obtained at two flow situations with different turbulent length scales, turbulence intensities, and yaw angle amplitudes. While the first one is representing light wind, the second one is recreating the presence of strong gusty wind.
Technical Paper

Introduction of the AeroSUV-A New Generic SUV Model for Aerodynamic Research

2019-04-02
2019-01-0646
Since the introduction of the DrivAer model, an increasing amount of aerodynamic research and CAE method development activities are based on this detailed generic car body. Due to the Open Access nature of the model, it has not only been quickly adopted by academia but also by several automotive OEMs and CAE software developers. The DrivAer has delivered high quality experimental data to permit validation of existing aerodynamic CAE capabilities and to accelerate the development of new sophisticated numerical methods. Within the last decades, the registration number of SUV, especially in Europe, has increased significantly. Among other things, a large cross-sectional area, an increased ground clearance and larger wheels characterize this kind of vehicle. The DrivAer is not capable of depicting this vehicle category. Therefore, there is a demand for an expansion of this generic vehicle concept.
Technical Paper

Flow around an Isolated Wheel - Experimental and Numerical Comparison of Two CFD Codes

2004-03-08
2004-01-0445
This paper presents velocity and pressure measurements obtained around an isolated wheel in a rotating and stationary configuration. The flow field was investigated using LDA and a total pressure probe in the model scale wind tunnel at IVK/FKFS. Drag and lift were determined for both configurations as well as for the wheel support only. These results were used as a reference for comparing numerical results obtained from two different CFD codes used in the automotive industry, namely STAR-CD™ and PowerFLOW™. The comparison gives a good overall agreement between the experimental and the simulated data. Both CFD codes show good correlation of the integral forces. The influence of the wheel rotation on drag and lift coefficients is predicted well. All mean flow structures which can be found in the planes measured with LDA can be recognized in the numerical results of both codes. Only small local differences remain, which can be attributed to the different CFD codes.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Numerical Study of the DrivAer Model Aerodynamics

2018-04-03
2018-01-0741
The DrivAer model, a detailed generic open source vehicle geometry, was introduced a few years ago and accepted widely from industry and academia for research in the field of automotive aerodynamics. This paper presents the evaluation of the aerodynamic properties of the 25% scale DrivAer model in both, CFD and in wind tunnel experiment. The results not only include aerodynamic drag and lift but also provide detailed investigations of the flow field around the vehicle. In addition to the available geometries of the DrivAer model, individual changes were introduced created by morphing the geometry of the baseline model. A good correlation between CFD and experiment could be achieved by using a CFD setup including the geometry of the wind tunnel test section. The results give insight into the aerodynamics of the DrivAer model and lead to a better understanding of the flow around the vehicle.
Technical Paper

CFD Approach to Evaluate Wind-Tunnel and Model Setup Effects on Aerodynamic Drag and Lift for Detailed Vehicles

2010-04-12
2010-01-0760
Previous work by the authors showed the development of an aerodynamic CFD model using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for simulating vehicles inside the IVK Model-Scale Wind-Tunnel test-section. In both experiment and simulation, alternate configurations of the wind-tunnel geometry were studied to change the pressure distribution in the wind-tunnel test section, inducing a reduction in aerodynamic drag due to interference between the wind-tunnel geometry and the pressure on the surface of the vehicle. The wind-tunnel pressure distribution was modified by adding so-called “stagnation bodies” inside the collector to create blockage and to increase the pressure in the rear portion of the test section. The primary purpose of previous work was to provide a validated CFD approach for modeling wind-tunnel interference effects, so that these effects can be understood and accounted for when designing vehicles.
Journal Article

A Review of Some Cooling Air Flow Measurement Techniques for Model Scale, Full Scale and CFD

2013-04-08
2013-01-0598
Each component of a drive train generates waste heat due to its limited efficiency. This waste heat is usually released to an air flow guided through one or more heat exchangers. So, the realized cooling air volume flow is one important characteristic value during the vehicle development process. This paper presents some of the available techniques for the measurement of cooling air volume flow in the vehicle during the different stages of an aerodynamic development process in model scale and full scale. Additionally, it provides suggestions when comparing these experimental values to CFD results.
X