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Technical Paper

“OPERAS” In Advanced Diesel Engines for Commercial and Military Applications

Advanced diesel engines developed for the commercial market need to be adapted to the military requirements by OPERAS (Optimizing the injection pressure P, the Exhaust gas recirculation E, injection events Retard and/or Advance and the swirl ratio S). The different after treatment devices, already used or expected to be applied to diesel engines, require feed gases of appropriate properties for their efficient operation. To produce these gases some OPERAS are needed to control the diesel combustion process. Since military vehicles do not need the after treatment devices, the OPERAS of the commercial engines should be modified to meet the military requirements for high power density, better fuel economy, reduction of parasitic losses caused by the cooled EGR system, and reduction of invisible black and white smoke in the field.
Technical Paper

White Smoke Emissions Under Cold Starting of Diesel Engines

1. Abstract More stringent regulations have been enforced over the past few years on diesel exhaust emissions. White smoke emission, a characteristic of diesel engines during cold starting, needs to be controlled in order to meet these regulations. This study investigates the sources and constituents of white smoke. The effects of fuel properties, design and operating parameters on the formation and emissions of white smoke are discussed. A new technique is developed to measure the real time gaseous hydrocarbons (HC) as well as the solid and liquid particulates. Experiments were conducted on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine in a cold room. The gaseous HC emissions are measured using a high frequency response flame ionization detector. The liquid and solid particulates are collected on a paper filter placed upstream of the sampling line of the FID and their masses are determined.
Technical Paper

Tribological Systems for High Temperature Diesel Engines

The U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Command is developing a future high power, low heat rejection military diesel engine. Performance requirements for the engine result in a predicted cylinder wall temperature of 560°C at the top piston ring reversal location. Thermal stresses imposed on the lubricant will therefore be unusually severe. Midwest Research Institute is developing the tribological system for this engine. A new general concept for high temperature diesel engine lubrication has been formulated. Our concept includes advanced synthetic liquid lubricants, solid lubricant additives, and self-lubricating materials. The lubricants, additives, and materials that have been selected for initial laboratory and engine evaluations of the concept are reported here.
Journal Article

Transient Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in the EGR Cooler

EGR is a proven technology used to reduce NOx formation in both compression and spark ignition engines by reducing the combustion temperature. In order to further increase its efficiency the recirculated gases are subjected to cooling. However, this leads to a higher load on the cooling system of the engine, thus requiring a larger radiator. In the case of turbocharged engines the large variations of the pressures, especially in the exhaust manifold, produce a highly pulsating EGR flow leading to non-steady-state heat transfer in the cooler. The current research presents a method of determining the pulsating flow field and the instantaneous heat transfer in the EGR heat exchanger. The processes are simulated using the CFD code FIRE (AVL) and the results are subjected to validation by comparison with the experimental data obtained on a 2.5 liter, four cylinder, common rail and turbocharged diesel engine.
Technical Paper

Thin Thermal Barrier Coatings for Engines

Contrary to the thick thermal barrier coating approach used in adiabatic diesel engines, the authors have investigated the merits of thin coatings. Transient heat transfer analysis indicates that the temperature swings experienced at combustion chamber surfaces depend primarily on material thermophysical properties, i.e., conductivity, density, and specific heat. Thus, cyclic temperature swings should be alike whether thick or thin (less than 0.25 mm) coatings are applied, Furthermore, thin coatings would lead to lower mean component temperatures and would be easier to apply than thick coatings. The thinly-coated engine concept offers several advantages including improved volumetric efficiency, lower cylinder liner wall temperatures, improved piston-liner tribological behavior, and improved erosion-corrosion resistance and thus greater component durability.
Technical Paper

Thermomechanical Stress Analysis of Novel Low Heat Rejection Cylinder Head Designs

High thermal stresses in the cylinder heads of low heat rejection (LHR) engines can lead to low cycle fatigue failure in the head. In order to decrease these stresses to a more acceptable level, novel designs are introduced. One design utilizes scallops in the bridge area, and three others utilize a high-strength, low thermal conductivity titanium faceplate inserted into the firedeck (combustion face) of a low heat rejection engine cylinder head. The faceplates are 5mm thick disks that span the firedeck from the injector bore to approximately 10mm outside of the cylinder liner. Large-scale finite element models for these four different LHR cylinder head configurations were created, and used to evaluate their strength performance on a pass/fail basis. The complex geometry of this cylinder head required very detailed three-dimensional analysis techniques, especially in the valve bridge area. This area is finely meshed to allow for accurate determination of stress gradients.
Technical Paper

Thermomechanical Analysis of a Low Heat Rejection Cylinder Head

Abstract A large scale, high resolution, finite element methodology for analysis of generic thermomechanical behavior of complex, low heat rejection engine components has been developed. This paper describes this process and presents an example evaluation of a low heat rejection cylinder head. Because of symmetry considerations, a one cylinder section of the head was modeled. However, the geometric nature of this cylinder head section required very precise three-dimensional analysis techniques. The completed three-dimensional model contains 40,696 elements and 48,536 nodes. The results of this example model show high stresses at the valve bridge and injector bore. These stresses result from a constrained thermal expansion of the head, and are generally compressive and radial in nature. A comparison of three different material types indicated that two of the three exceeded, and one was below the elastic limit.
Technical Paper

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Monolithic Ceramic Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engine Components

The future of maintaining a superior mobile military ground vehicle fleet rests in high power density propulsion systems. As the U.S. Government desires to convert its powerplant base to heavy fuel operation, there arises the opportunity to incorporate new advanced materials into these heavy fuel engines. These newer materials serve the purpose of decreasing powerplant weight and develop new component designs to take advantage of improved strength and temperature capability of those materials. In addition, the military continues the effort for a non-watercooled Low Heat Rejection (LHR) diesel engine. This type of engine demands the use of ceramic and advanced ceramic composite material hardware. Furthermore, today's higher pressure fuel injection systems, coupled with reduced air/fuel ratio as a means of increasing horsepower to size and weight, will require thermal protection or change in material specification for many of the engine's components.
Technical Paper

Thermal Barrier Coatings for High Output Turbocharged Diesel Engine

Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are perceived as enabling technology to increase low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine performance and improve its longevity. The state of the art of thermal barrier coating is the plasma spray zirconia. In addition, other material systems have been investigated for the next generation of thermal barrier coatings. The purpose of this TBC program is to focus on developing binder systems with low thermal conductivity materials to improve the coating durability under high load and temperature cyclical conditions encountered in the real engine. Research and development (R&D) and analysis were conducted on aluminum alloy piston for high output turbocharged diesel engine coated with TBC.
Technical Paper

TACOM/Cummins Adiabatic Engine Program

This paper discusses the goals, progress, and future plans of the TACOM/Cummins Adiabatic Engine Program. The Adiabatic Engine concept insulates the diesel combustion chamber with high temperature materials to allow hot operation near an adiabatic operation condition. Additional power and improved efficiency derived from this concept occur because thermal energy, normally lost to the cooling and exhaust systems, is converted to useful power through the use of turbomachinery and high-temperature materials. Engine testing has repeatedly demonstrated the Adiabatic Engine to be the most fuel efficient engine in the world with multi-cylinder engine performance levels of 0.285 LB/BHP-HR (48% thermal efficiency) at 450 HP representative. Installation of an early version of the Adiabatic Engine within a military 5 ton truck has been completed, with initial vehicle evaluation successfully accomplished.
Technical Paper

Simulation-Based Cold-Start Control Strategy for a Diesel Engine with Common Rail Fuel System at Different Ambient Temperatures

A new tool has been used to arrive at appropriate split injection strategy for reducing the cranking period during the cold start of a multi-cylinder engine at decreasing ambient temperatures. The concept behind this tool is that the combination of different injection parameters that produce the highest IMEP should be able to improve the cold startability of the diesel engine. In this work the following injection parameters were considered: 1) injection timing, 2) split injection fraction, 3) dwell time and 4) total fuel mass injected per cycle. A commercial engine cyclic simulation code has been modified for diesel engine cycle simulation at lower ambient temperatures. The code was used to develop IMEP control maps. The maps were used to identify the parameters that would give the best IMEP. The strategies that have been identified have been validated experimentally in a multi-cylinder diesel engine equipped with a common rail fuel injection system.
Technical Paper

Simulation of Diesel Engines Cold-Start

Diesel engine cold-start problems include long cranking periods, hesitation and white smoke emissions. A better understanding of these problems is essential to improve diesel engine cold-start. In this study computer simulation model is developed for the steady state and transient cold starting processes in a single-cylinder naturally aspirated direct injection diesel engine. The model is verified experimentally and utilized to determine the key parameters that affect the cranking period and combustion instability after the engine starts. The behavior of the fuel spray before and after it impinges on the combustion chamber walls was analyzed in each cycle during the cold-start operation. The analysis indicated that the accumulated fuel in combustion chamber has a major impact on engine cold starting through increasing engine compression pressure and temperature and increasing fuel vapor concentration in the combustion chamber during the ignition delay period.
Technical Paper

Simulation of Combustion in Direct-Injection Low Swirl Heavy-Duty Type Diesel Engines

A two phase, global combustion model has been developed for quiescent chamber, direct injection diesel engines. The first stage of the model is essentially a spark ignition engine flame spread model which has been adapted to account for fuel injection effects. During this stage of the combustion process, ignition and subsequent flame spread/heat release are confined to a mixing layer which has formed on the injected jet periphery during the ignition delay period. Fuel consumption rate is dictated by mixing layer dynamics, laminar flame speed, large scale turbulence intensity, and local jet penetration rate. The second stage of the model is also a time scale approach which is explicitly controlled by the global mixing rate. Fuel-air preparation occurs on a large-scale level throughout this phase of the combustion process with each mixed fuel parcel eventually burning at a characteristic time scale as dictated by the global mixing rate.
Technical Paper

Simplified Elasto-Hydrodynamic Friction Model of the Cam-Tappet Contact

The paper analyses the particularities of the lubricating conditions at the contact between the cam and a flat tappet in the valve train of an internal combustion engine and develops a method for the calculation of the friction force. The existing lubrication models show the predominance of the entraining speed and oil viscosity on the thickness of the oil film entrapped between cam and tappet, predicting a very small value (less than 0.1 μm) of the oil film thickness (OFT). The oil viscosity increases exponentially with pressure in the Hertzian contact, determining non-Newtonian behavior of the oil in the contact zone. Using the model developed by Greenwood and Tripp [11] for the contact of two rough surfaces and the Eyring model [2] for the oil it is shown that non-Newtonian behavior of the oil prevails and that the OFT plays a secondary role on the friction force.
Technical Paper

Relationships Between Exhaust Smoke Emissions and Operating Variables in Diesel Engines

The study relates air/fuel ratio, fuel injection timing, and engine speed to exhaust smoke levels and performance of the diesel engine. Additional data were obtained under supercharged and turbocharged inlet air conditions to investigate the applicability of the derived relationships under these conditions. Limited data using a variance in fuel type were obtained. Insight into the basic mechanism of smoke formation in diesel engines was gained. The relative percentages of fuel injected before ignition (i.e., premixed fuel) and after initiation of combustion (i.e., unmixed diffusion burning fuel) were found to be extremely significant in determining smoke levels. A smoke factor (the ratio of equivalence ratio in the combustion chamber at initial ignition to overall equivalence ratio) was formulated and found to be useful in predicting smoke phenomena in diesel engines.
Technical Paper

Recent Development of Tribological Coatings for High Temperature Engines

Lubrication of advanced high temperature engines has been one of the greatest obstacles in the development of the Adiabatic engine. Liquid lubricants which gave lubricating properties as well as heat removal function can no longer carry out this duty when piston ring top ring reversal temperatures approach 540°C. Solid lubricants offer some hope. Since solid lubricants cannot perform the heat removal function, its coefficient of friction must be very low, at least <0.10, in order to prevent heat build up and subsequent destruction to the piston rings and cylinder liners. The Hybrid Piston concept developed in the U.S. Army Advanced Tribology program offers some hope, since the top solid lubricant ring slides over the bottom hydrodynamic lubricant film section during each stroke. This paper presents the progress made with the solid lubricant top ring in the Hybrid Piston. Four materials have shown promise in the laboratory to fullfil its mission.
Technical Paper

Performance of a Ceramic Rotor in a Cummins T46 Turbocharger

This paper documents the successful operation of a modified Cummins T46 turbocharger with a ceramic rotor. This turbocharger is modified to incorporate a 4.6 inch diameter ceramic turbine rotor (pressureless sintered silicon nitride) on the hot end. These results document the most complete ceramic turbine rotor performance map, for a large ceramic turbocharger rotor, available to date.
Technical Paper

Performance Assessment of US. Army Truck with Adiabatic Diesel Engine

An investigation into the fuel economy of a U.S. Army M813 5-ton truck with an “adiabatic” (uncooled) 14 liter (855 in3) diesel engine was made with three different driving schedules. The results were used to verify a newly written vehicle simulation. This simulation was used to compare the fuel economy of an uncooled turbocharged engine, a water cooled turbocharged engine, and a water cooled naturally aspirated engine in the same vehicle. Results indicate that, depending on the duty cycle a 16% to 37% improvement in fuel economy (depending on the duty cycle) can be achieved with an uncooled engine in this vehicle.
Journal Article

Particulate Matter Characterization Studies in an HSDI Diesel Engine under Conventional and LTC Regime

Several mechanisms are discussed to understand the particulate matter (PM) characterization in a high speed, direct injection, single cylinder diesel engine using low sulfur diesel fuel. This includes their formation, size distribution and number density. Experiments were conducted over a wide range of injection pressures, EGR rates, injection timings and swirl ratios, therefore covering both conventional and low temperature combustion regimes. A micro dilution tunnel was used to immediately dilute a small part of the exhaust gases by hot air. A Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was used to measure the particulate size distribution and number density. Particulate mass was measured with a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM). Analysis was made of the root cause of PM characterization and their relationship with the combustion process under different operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Optical and Numerical Investigation of Pre-Injection Reactions and Their Effect on the Starting of a Diesel Engine

Ultraviolet chemiluminescence has been observed in a diesel engine cyclinder during compression, but prior to fuel injection under engine starting conditions. During a portion of the warm-up sequence, the intensity of this emission exhibits a strong correlation to the phasing of the subsequent combustion. Engine exhaust measurements taken from a continuously misfiring, motored engine confirm the generation of formaldehyde (HCHO) in such processes. Fractions of this compound are expected to be recycled as residual to participate in the following combustion cycle. Spectral measurements taken during the compression period prior to fuel injection match the features of Emeleus' cool flame HCHO bands that have been observed during low temperature heat release reactions occurring in lean HCCI combustion. That the signal from the OH* bands is weak implies a buildup of HCHO during compression.