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White Paper

The Use of Imaging for Powder Metal Characterization and Contamination Identification

2018-04-05
WP-0008
As AM technologies are being used with higher frequencywithin the automotive and aerospace industries, the interest in powder characterization and contaminant identification is growing—especially for suppliers looking to gain entry into these highly regulated industries. Standards for powder materials and methods used for aerospace applications are still be developed, and regulatory agencies such as the Federal Aviation Administration have been requesting that standards be developed as guidance for the industry. Methods such as CCSEM and HLS could be viable options for suppliers needing to adhere to a powder specification by demonstrating compliance. Solutions exist to integrate such methods into a production environment as exemplified by RJ Lee Group.
White Paper

PROACTIVE METHODS FOR ROAD SAFETY ANALYSIS

2017-10-12
WP-0005
To date, the universal metric for road safety has been historical crash data, specifically, crash frequency and severity, which are direct measures of safety. However, there are well-recognized shortcomings of the crash-based approach; its greatest drawback being that it is reactive and requires long observational periods. Surrogate measures of safety, which encompass measures of safety that do not rely on crash data, have been proposed as a proactive approach to road safety analysis. This white paper provides an overview of the concept and evolution of surrogate measures of safety, as well as the emerging and future methods and measures. This is followed by the identification of the standards needs in this discipline as well as the scope of SAE’s Surrogate Measures of Safety Committee.
Technical Paper

National Automotive Service Task Force: A Case Study of Industry Collaboration to Improve Serviceability by Resolving Gaps in Vehicle Service and Tool Information

2008-04-14
2008-01-1285
In 1990 in the USA, Section 206 of the Clean Air Act ushered in a new era in passenger car and light truck service and maintenance. Ensuing requirements led to introduction of sophisticated vehicle on-board diagnostic systems. These systems demand the increasing sophistication of service providers. The amount of service information has expanded exponentially. The sophistication of the tools needed to diagnose and repair vehicles has become increasingly complex. To meet the needs of today's service professionals, new systems had to be developed. The convergence of regulations, vehicle complexity, tool capabilities and the growing volume of service information required the vehicle producers and service communities to implement more efficient information delivery systems.
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