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Standard

Welding, Brazing, and Soldering - Materials and Practices

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J1147_201801
The Joint AWS/SAE Committee on Automotive Welding was organized on January 16, 1974, for the primary purpose of facilitating the development and publication of various documents related to the selection, specification, testing, and use of welding materials and practices, particularly for the automotive and related industries. A secondary purpose is the dissemination of technical information.
Standard

WELDING, BRAZING, AND SOLDERING—MATERIALS AND PRACTICES

1983-06-01
HISTORICAL
J1147_198306
The Joint AWS/SAE Committee on Automotive Welding was organized on January 16, 1974, for the primary purpose of facilitating the development and publication of various documents related to the selection, specification, testing, and use of welding materials and practices, particularly for the automotive and related industries. A secondary purpose is the dissemination of technical information.
Standard

Penetrating Radiation Inspection

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J427_201801
The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to provide basic information on penetrating radiation, as applied in the field of nondestructive testing, and to supply the user with sufficient information so that he may decide whether penetrating radiation methods apply to his particular inspection need. Detailed information references are listed in Section 2.
Standard

PENETRATING RADIATION INSPECTION

1991-03-01
HISTORICAL
J427_199103
The purpose of this SAE Information Report is to provide basic information on penetrating radiation, as applied in the field of nondestructive testing, and to supply the user with sufficient information so that he may decide whether penetrating radiation methods apply to his particular inspection need. Detailed information references are listed in Section 2.
Standard

Microscopic Determination of Inclusions in Steels

2018-01-10
CURRENT
J422_201801
This recommended microscopic practice for evaluating the inclusion content in steel has been developed as a practical method of quantitatively determining the degree of cleanliness of steel. This method has been established as a reasonable control for steel mill operations and acceptance for production manufacturing. It has been widely accepted for carbon and alloy steel bars, billets, and slabs. Exceptions are resulfurized grades which are outside the limits of these photomicrographs and the high carbon bearing quality steels which are generally classified using ASTM E 45-60T, Method A, Jernkontoret Charts.
Standard

Definitions of Heat Treating Terms

1975-08-01
HISTORICAL
J415F_197508
(These definitions were prepared by the Joint Committee on Definitions of Terms Relating to Heat Treatment appointed by the American Society for Testing and Materials, The American Society for Metals, the American Foundrymen's Association, and the SAE.) This SAE revision emphasizes the terms used in heat treating ferrous alloys, but also includes for reference some non-ferrous definitions at the end of the document. This glossary is not intended to be a specification, and it should not be interpreted as such. Since this is intended to be strictly a set of definitions, temperatures have been omitted purposely.
Standard

Definitions of Heat Treating Terms

1975-01-01
HISTORICAL
J415E_197501
(These definitions were prepared by the Joint Committee on Definitions of Terms Relating to Heat Treatment appointed by the American Society for Testing and Materials, The American Society for Metals, the American Foundrymen's Association, and the SAE.) This SAE revision emphasizes the terms used in heat treating ferrous alloys, but also includes for reference some non-ferrous definitions at the end of the document. This glossary is not intended to be a specification, and it should not be interpreted as such. Since this is intended to be strictly a set of definitions, temperatures have been omitted purposely.
Standard

Definitions of Heat Treating Terms

1983-06-01
HISTORICAL
J415_198306
(These definitions were prepared by the Joint Committee on Definitions of Terms Relating to Heat Treatment appointed by the American Society for Testing and Materials, The American Society for Metals, the American Foundrymen's Association, and the SAE.) This SAE revision emphasizes the terms used in heat treating ferrous alloys, but also includes for reference some non-ferrous definitions at the end of the document. This glossary is not intended to be a specification, and it should not be interpreted as such. Since this is intended to be strictly a set of definitions, temperatures have been omitted purposely.
Standard

Definitions of Heat Treating Terms

1977-03-01
HISTORICAL
J415J_197703
(These definitions were prepared by the Joint Committee on Definitions of Terms Relating to Heat Treatment appointed by the American Society for Testing and Materials, The American Society for Metals, the American Foundrymen's Association, and the SAE.) This SAE revision emphasizes the terms used in heat treating ferrous alloys, but also includes for reference some non-ferrous definitions at the end of the document. This glossary is not intended to be a specification, and it should not be interpreted as such. Since this is intended to be strictly a set of definitions, temperatures have been omitted purposely.
Standard

Definitions of Heat Treating Terms

1980-08-01
HISTORICAL
J415_198008
(These definitions were prepared by the Joint Committee on Definitions of Terms Relating to Heat Treatment appointed by the American Society for Testing and Materials, The American Society for Metals, the American Foundrymen's Association, and the SAE.) This SAE revision emphasizes the terms used in heat treating ferrous alloys, but also includes for reference some non-ferrous definitions at the end of the document. This glossary is not intended to be a specification, and it should not be interpreted as such. Since this is intended to be strictly a set of definitions, temperatures have been omitted purposely.
Standard

Definitions of Heat Treating Terms

1976-04-01
HISTORICAL
J415H_197604
(These definitions were prepared by the Joint Committee on Definitions of Terms Relating to Heat Treatment appointed by the American Society for Testing and Materials, The American Society for Metals, the American Foundrymen's Association, and the SAE.) This SAE revision emphasizes the terms used in heat treating ferrous alloys, but also includes for reference some non-ferrous definitions at the end of the document. This glossary is not intended to be a specification, and it should not be interpreted as such. Since this is intended to be strictly a set of definitions, temperatures have been omitted purposely.
Standard

Anodized Aluminum Automotive Parts

2019-11-11
WIP
J399
Automotive parts can be fabricated from either coiled sheet, flat sheet or extruded shapes. Alloy selection is governed by finish requirements, forming characteristics, and mechanical properties. Bright anodizing alloys 5657 and 5252 sheet provide a high luster and are preferred for trim which can be formed from an intermediate temper, such as H25. Bright anodizing alloy 5457 is used for parts which require high elongation and a fully annealed ('0') temper. Alloy 6463 is a medium strength bright anodizing extrusion alloy; Alloy X7016 is a high strength bright anodizing extrusion alloy primarily suited for bumper applications. To satisfy anti-glare requirements for certain trim applications, sheet alloy 5205 and extrusion alloy 6063 are capable of providing the desired low-gloss anodized finish.
Standard

ANODIZED ALUMINUM AUTOMOTIVE PARTS

1985-02-01
CURRENT
J399_198502
Automotive parts can be fabricated from either coiled sheet, flat sheet or extruded shapes. Alloy selection is governed by finish requirements, forming characteristics, and mechanical properties. Bright anodizing alloys 5657 and 52521 sheet provide a high luster and are preferred for trim which can be formed from an intermediate temper, such as H25. Bright anodizing alloy 5457 is used for parts which require high elongation and a fully annealed ("0") temper. Alloy 6463 is a medium strength bright anodizing extrusion alloy; Alloy X7016 is a high strength bright anodizing extrusion alloy primarily suited for bumper applications. To satisfy anti-glare requirements for certain trim applications, sheet alloy 5205 and extrusion alloy 6063 are capable of providing the desired low-gloss anodized finish.
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