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Standard

Zinc Die Casting Alloys

2017-12-20
CURRENT
J469_201712
Because of the drastic chilling involved in die casting and the fact that the solid solubilities of both aluminum and copper in zinc change with temperature, these alloys are subject to some aging changes, one of which is a dimensional change. Both of the alloys undergo a slight shrinkage after casting, which at room temperature is about two-thirds complete in five weeks. It is possible to accelerate this shrinkage by a stabilizing anneal, after which no further changes occur. The recommended stabilizing anneal is 3 to 6 h at 100 °C (212 °F), or 5 to 10 h at 85 °C (185 °F), or 10 to 20 h at 70 °C (158 °F). The time in each case is measured from the time at which the castings reach the annealing temperature. The parts may be air cooled after annealing. Such a treatment will cause a shrinkage (0.0004 in per in) of about two-thirds of the total, and the remaining shrinkage will occur at room temperature during the subsequent few weeks.
Standard

Zinc Alloy Ingot and Die Casting Compositions

1983-06-01
HISTORICAL
J468_198306
Similar Specifications: UNS Z33521, former SAE J903, ingot is similar to ASTM B 240-79, Alloy AG40A; and UNS Z33520, former SAE 903, die casting is similar to ASTM B 86-76, Alloy AG40A. UNS Z35530, former SAE 925, ingot is similar to ASTM B 240-79, Alloy AC41A; and UNS Z35531, former 925, die casting is similar to ASTM B 86-82a, Alloy AC41A.
Standard

Zinc Alloy Ingot and Die Casting Compositions

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J468_201801
SIMILAR SPECIFICATIONS—UNS Z33521, former SAE 903, ingot is similar to ASTM B 240-79, Alloy AG40A; and UNS Z33520, former SAE 903, die casting is similar to ASTM B 86-76, Alloy AG40A. UNS Z35530, former SAE 925, ingot is similar to ASTM B 240-79, Alloy AC41A; and UNS Z35531, former SAE 925, die casting is similar to ASTM B 86-82a, Alloy AC41A.
Standard

ZINC DIE CASTING ALLOYS

1989-01-01
HISTORICAL
J469_198901
Because of the drastic chilling involved in die casting and the fact that the solid solubilities of both aluminum and copper in zinc change with temperature, these alloys are subject to some aging changes, one of which is a dimensional change. Both of the alloys undergo a slight shrinkage after casting, which at room temperature is about two-thirds complete in five weeks. It is possible to accelerate this shrinkage by a stabilizing anneal, after which no further changes occur. The recommended stabilizing anneal is 3 to 6 h at 100 °C (212 °F), or 5 to 10 h at 85 °C (185 °F), or 10 to 20 h at 70 °C (158 °F). The time in each case is measured from the time at which the castings reach the annealing temperature. The parts may be air cooled after annealing. Such a treatment will cause a shrinkage (0.0004 in per in) of about two-thirds of the total, and the remaining shrinkage will occur at room temperature during the subsequent few weeks.
Standard

ZINC ALLOY INGOT AND DIE CASTING COMPOSITIONS

1988-12-01
HISTORICAL
J468_198812
SIMILAR SPECIFICATIONS—UNS Z33521, former SAE 903, ingot is similar to ASTM B 240-79, Alloy AG40A; and UNS Z33520, former SAE 903, die casting is similar to ASTM B 86-76, Alloy AG40A. UNS Z35530, former SAE 925, ingot is similar to ASTM B 240-79, Alloy AC41A; and UNS Z35531, former SAE 925, die casting is similar to ASTM B 86-82a, Alloy AC41A.
Standard

Wrought copper and Copper Alloys

2002-12-20
HISTORICAL
J463_200212
This standard1 describes the chemical, mechanical, and dimensional requirements for a wide range of wrought copper and copper alloys used in the automotive and related industries.
Standard

Wrought and Cast Copper Alloys

1981-09-01
HISTORICAL
J461_198109
Factors influencing the uses of wrought copper and copper alloys concern electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, machinability, formability, fatigue characteristics, strength, corrosion resistance, the ease with which alloys can be joined, and the fact that these materials are nonmagnetic. Copper and its alloy also have a wide range of rich, pleasing colors. The only other metal with such distinctive coloring is gold. These materials are all easily finished by buffing, scratch brushing, plating or chemically coloring, or clear protective coating systems. When it is desired to improve one or more of the important properties of copper, alloying often solves the problem. A wide range of alloys, therefore, has been developed and commercially employed, such as the high copper alloys, brasses, leaded brasses, tin bronzes, heat treatable alloys, copper-nickel alloys, nickel silvers, and special bronzes. nickel silvers, and special bronzes.
Standard

Wrought and Cast Copper Alloys

2002-12-20
HISTORICAL
J461_200212
For convenience, this SAE Information Report is presented in two parts as shown below. To avoid repetition, however, data applicable to both wrought and cast alloys is included only in Part 1. Part I—Wrought Copper and Copper Alloys Types of Copper (Table 1) General Characteristics (Table 3) Electrical Conductivity Thermal Conductivity General Mechanical Properties (Table 10) Yield Strength Fatigue Strength Physical Properties (Table 2) General Fabricating Properties (Table 3) Formability Bending Hot Forming Machinability Joining Surface Finishing Color Corrosion Resistance Effect of Temperature Typical Uses (Table 3) Part II—Cast Copper Alloys Types of Casting Alloys Effects of Alloy Elements and Impurities General Characteristics (Table 11) Physical Properties (Table 12) Typical Uses (Table 11)
Standard

Wrought and Cast Copper Alloys

1976-03-01
HISTORICAL
J461D_197603
Factors influencing the uses of wrought copper and copper alloys concern electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, machinability, formability, fatigue characteristics, strength, corrosion resistance, the ease with which alloys can be joined, and the fact that these materials are nonmagnetic. Copper and its alloy also have a wide range of rich, pleasing colors. The only other metal with such distinctive coloring is gold. These materials are all easily finished by buffing, scratch brushing, plating or chemically coloring, or clear protective coating systems. When it is desired to improve one or more of the important properties of copper, alloying often solves the problem. A wide range of alloys, therefore, has been developed and commercially employed, such as the high copper alloys, brasses, leaded brasses, tin bronzes, heat treatable alloys, copper-nickel alloys, nickel silvers, and special bronzes. nickel silvers, and special bronzes.
Standard

Wrought and Cast Copper Alloys

2018-01-09
CURRENT
J461_201801
For convenience, this SAE Information Report is presented in two parts as shown below. To avoid repetition, however, data applicable to both wrought and cast alloys is included only in Part 1. Part I—Wrought Copper and Copper Alloys Types of Copper (Table 1) General Characteristics (Table 3) Electrical Conductivity Thermal Conductivity General Mechanical Properties (Table 10) Yield Strength Fatigue Strength Physical Properties (Table 2) General Fabricating Properties (Table 3) Formability Bending Hot Forming Machinability Joining Surface Finishing Color Corrosion Resistance Effect of Temperature Typical Uses (Table 3) Part II—Cast Copper Alloys Types of Casting Alloys Effects of Alloy Elements and Impurities General Characteristics (Table 11) Physical Properties (Table 12) Typical Uses (Table 11)
Standard

Wrought Nickel and Nickel-Related Alloys

1976-07-01
HISTORICAL
J470C_197607
This Report presents general information on over 50 alloys in which nickel either predominates or is a significant alloying element. It covers primarily wrought materials, and is not necessarily all inclusive. Values given are in most cases average or nominal, and if more precise values are required the producer(s) should be contacted. This report does not cover the so-called 'superalloys,' or the iron base stainless steels. Refer to SAE J467, Special Purpose Alloys, and SAE J405, Chemical Compositions of SAE Wrought Stainless Steels, respectively, for data on these alloys.
Standard

Wrought Nickel and Nickel-Related Alloys

2018-02-15
CURRENT
J470_201802
This Report presents general information on over 50 alloys in which nickel either predominates or is a significant alloying element. It covers primarily wrought materials, and is not necessarily all inclusive. Values given are in most cases average or nominal, and if more precise values are required the producer(s) should be contacted. This report does not cover the so-called "superalloys," or the iron base stainless steels. Refer to SAE J467, Special Purpose Alloys, and SAE J405, Chemical Compositions of SAE Wrought Stainless Steels, respectively, for data on these alloys.
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