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Standard

Regulatory Requirements Covering the Use of Breathing Oxygen in Aircraft

2002-02-15
HISTORICAL
AIR1389A
This report presents, paraphrased in tabular format, an overview of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) and the Joint Aviation Regulations (JAR) for aircraft oxygen systems. It is intended as a ready reference for those considering the use of oxygen in aircraft and those wishing to familiarize themselves with the systems requirements for existing aircraft. This document is not intended to replace the oxygen related FAR/JAR but rather to index them in some order. For detailed information, the user is referred to the current issue of the relevant FAR/JAR paragraph referenced in this report.
Standard

Provisions of Medical Oxygen for Aircraft Occupants

2012-06-06
CURRENT
AIR6190
This document provides information on provisions for passengers with disabilities on board commercial aircraft. In this context the term "provision of medical oxygen" shall be understood as application of oxygen on board an aircraft not linked to (post) decompression in the sense of Airworthiness Requirements FAR/CS 25 and Operational Regulations of FAR 121/135. Information about available equipment and physiological treatment in clinical practice will be provided in this document. It covers the use of oxygen concentrators according to guidance of FAR Advisory Circular AC120-95.
Standard

Passenger Oxygen Mask

1999-01-01
CURRENT
AS8025A
This standard covers oronasal type masks which use a continuous flow oxygen supply. Each such mask comprises a facepiece with valves as required, a mask suspension device, a reservoir, or rebreather bag (when used), a length of tubing for connection to the oxygen supply source, and a means for allowing the crew to determine if oxygen is being delivered to the mask. The assembly shall be capable of being stowed suitably to meet the requirements of its intended use.
Standard

Packaging and Transportation of Oxygen Equipment

2010-08-25
HISTORICAL
AIR5742
The scope of this document is related to the particular needs of oxygen equipment with regards to packaging and transportation. The document provides guidance for handling chemical, gaseous and liquid oxygen equipment. It summarizes national and international regulations to be taken into account for transportation on land, sea and air and provides information on classification of hazardous material. The aim of this document is to summarize information on packaging and transportation of oxygen equipment. Statements and references to regulations cited herein are for information only and should not be considered as interpretation of a law. Processes to maintain cleanliness of components and subassemblies during processing and assembly or storage of work-in-progress are outside the scope of this document.
Standard

Packaging and Transportation of Oxygen Equipment

2017-05-24
CURRENT
AIR5742A
The scope of this document is related to the particular needs of oxygen equipment with regards to packaging and transportation. The document provides guidance for handling chemical, gaseous and liquid oxygen equipment. It summarizes national and international regulations to be taken into account for transportation on land, sea and air and provides information on classification of hazardous material. The aim of this document is to summarize information on packaging and transportation of oxygen equipment. Statements and references to regulations cited herein are for information only and should not be considered as interpretation of a law. Processes to maintain cleanliness of components and subassemblies during processing and assembly or storage of work-in-progress are outside the scope of this document. Guidance on this can be obtained from ARP1176.
Standard

Oxygen Systems for General Aviation

2014-07-11
CURRENT
AIR822C
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides a general overview of oxygen systems for general aviation use. Included are a brief review of the factors and effects of hypoxia, system descriptions, and mission explanations for system or component selection, and techniques for safe handling of oxygen distribution systems.
Standard

Oxygen Systems for General Aviation

2006-06-05
HISTORICAL
AIR822B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides a general overview of oxygen systems for general aviation use. Included are a brief review of the factors and effects of hypoxia, system descriptions, and mission explanations for system or component selection, and techniques for safe handling of oxygen distribution systems.
Standard

Oxygen Systems for General Aviation

1996-08-01
HISTORICAL
AIR822A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides a general overview of oxygen systems for general aviation use. Included are a brief review of the factors and effects of hypoxia, system descriptions, and mission explanations for system or component selection, and techniques for safe handling of oxygen distribution systems.
Standard

Oxygen System and Component Cleaning and Packaging

1999-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1176
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides recommended practices for cleaning aircraft oxygen equipment such as tubing, pieces parts (including regulator and valve parts), cylinders and ground-based equipment that may be used to support aircraft oxygen systems. These methods may apply to gaseous and liquid oxygen equipment. This document specifies work area details, methods to select suitable cleaning chemicals, cleaning methods, test methods to verify cleanliness level, and methods of packaging the components and parts after cleaning. Person designated to clean oxygen equipment should be qualified and trained to clean oxygen equipment. Cleanliness levels achieved are strongly dependent on the capabilities of the persons performing the cleaning operation.
Standard

Oxygen System and Component Cleaning

2020-10-19
CURRENT
ARP1176B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides recommended practices for the cleaning of aircraft oxygen equipment, both metallic and non-metallic articles, such as oxygen lines (tubes, hoses, etc.), components (including regulator and valve parts), cylinders, and ground-based equipment that may be used to support aircraft oxygen systems. This document also specifies work area details, methods for selecting suitable cleaning agents, cleaning methods, and test methods for verifying levels of cleanliness. The cleanliness coding scheme specified in this document provides a method for documenting minimum cleanliness level requirements and for identifying compliance.
Standard

Oxygen System and Component Cleaning

2013-06-11
HISTORICAL
ARP1176A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides recommended practices for cleaning aircraft oxygen equipment such as tubing, pieces, parts (including regulator and valve parts), cylinders and ground-based equipment that may be used to support aircraft oxygen systems. This revision introduces a cleanliness coding scheme that can be referenced as a requirement, and/or referenced to identify compliance to meeting such a requirement. These methods may apply to gaseous and liquid oxygen equipment. This document specifies work area details, methods to select suitable cleaning agents, cleaning methods, test methods to verify cleanliness level, and methods of packaging the components and parts after cleaning. Technicians designated to clean oxygen equipment must be qualified and trained to clean oxygen equipment. This ARP is applicable to metallic and non-metallic parts.
Standard

Oxygen System Fill/Check Valve

1997-12-01
CURRENT
AS1225A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines minimum standards of design, construction, and performance for two types of permanently installed, high pressure 12,800 kPa (1850 psig) and 13,800 kPa (2000 psig) oxygen system cylinder fill valves used in commercial aircraft. Refer to Purchaser's Specification for Requirements which are beyond the scope or level of detail provided in this document. One valve has an adjustable pressure sensitive closing valve to automatically control the final pressure for a correct amount of oxygen in the system. The second valve incorporates an automatic shutoff feature designed to limit system overpressurization in the event maintenance personnel do not stop system filling at the correct pressure. The intent of the fill valves is to control the rate of fill to limit the rise in temperature caused by compression heating to acceptable values, prevent oxygen back flow and prevent the ingestion of foreign matter that could cause contamination of the system.
Standard

Oxygen Flow Indication

2019-01-10
CURRENT
AS916C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the overall requirements applicable to oxygen flow indication as required by Airworthiness Requirements of CS/FAR 25.1449 to show that oxygen is being delivered to the dispensing equipment. Requirements of this document shall be applicable to any type of oxygen system technology and encompass “traditional” pneumatic devices, as well electric/electronic indication.
Standard

Oxygen Equipment for Aircraft

1999-05-01
HISTORICAL
AIR825C
This report provides information on the design and use of aircraft oxygen systems. It explains the physiological oxygen requirements of the human body in both a normal environment and in an hypoxic environment. It includes an overview of the continuous flow, demand and pressure demand, and liquid oxygen systems. A basic understanding of how each system operates is then specifically addressed in its own titled section. The charts, tables, and schematics provide a specific example of a theoretical oxygen system design and the calculations showing how that system would meet the regulations established by the FAR’s. A comprehensive overview of the theoretical oxygen requirements of the human body at altitude is also provided. A detailed list of specifications and standards applicable to aircraft oxygen systems is included.
Standard

Oxygen Equipment for Aircraft

2012-12-03
CURRENT
AIR825D
This report provides information on the design and use of aircraft oxygen systems. It explains the physiological oxygen requirements of the human body in both a normal environment and in an hypoxic environment. It includes an overview of the continuous flow, demand and pressure demand, and liquid oxygen systems. A basic understanding of how each system operates is then specifically addressed in its own titled section. The charts, tables, and schematics provide a specific example of a theoretical oxygen system design and the calculations showing how that system would meet the regulations established by the FAR’s. A comprehensive overview of the theoretical oxygen requirements of the human body at altitude is also provided. A detailed list of specifications and standards applicable to aircraft oxygen systems is included.
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