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User's Guide to AMS Specifications

1994-06-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4779
The reader of specifications sometimes needs some help understanding the reasoning behind certain usage of terms. The scope of this AIR is to explain the functions of the various sections of the specifications, why some of the terms in AMS specifications are used, and how the specification system works. After the introduction, the topics are shown in the order they usually appear in specifications.
Standard

Timer Assembly Rain Repellent

2000-03-01
CURRENT
AS81587
This specification covers the requirements for an interval timer for controlling the duration of an electrical pulse to a solenoid valve for use in Rain Repellent systems covered by Specification MIL-R-81589.
Standard

Spray Kit, Self Pressurized

1999-07-01
CURRENT
AS22805
This specification covers the requirements for disposable self-pressurized kits which utilize a propellant can pressurized with a liquified gas to atomize a product contained in a separate but attached jar (see 6.1).
Standard

Splicing; Cable Terminal, Process for, Aircraft

1999-07-01
CURRENT
AS56761
This specification is designed to present detailed procedure to be followed in splicing cable terminals. The types of cable to which this specification applies are listed in Section 2 and table I.
Standard

Shock and Vibration Evaluation of Packaging

1996-05-01
CURRENT
ARP476A
This document describes guidelines and methods of performing the safety assessment for certification of civil aircraft. It is primarily associated with showing compliance with FAR/JAR 25.1309. The methods outlined here identify a systematic means, but not the only means, to show compliance. A subset of this material may be applicable to non-25.1309 equipment. The concept of Aircraft Level Safety Assessment is introduced and the tools to accomplish this task are outlined. The overall aircraft operating environment is considered. When aircraft derivatives or system changes are certified, the processes described herein are usually applicable only to the new designs or to existing designs that are affected by the changes. In the case of the implementation of existing designs in a new derivation, alternate means such as service experience may be used to show compliance.
Standard

SPECIFICATION FOR AN AUTOMATED INTERCHANGE OF STANDARDS DATA

1988-04-12
CURRENT
AS4159
The requirements contained herein are intended for those standards that are promulgated by national standards organizations and used in the aerospace industry. These technical data include narrative text, tables and various graphic data which comprise the standards. Both interface control and interface definitions are covered in this specification. The internal architectures of the computer facilities of either the providers or the users are not constrained by this interchange specification. Rather, neutral formats and transmitting media are defined in order to enable more cost-effective ways to distribute information for computer users than by sending printed documents. This method for digital delivery of aerospace standards is intended to allow the users to display and maintain standards on current computer systems in addition to producing hard copy comparable to existing printed standards.
Standard

Minimum Performance Standard for Parachute Assemblies and Components, Personnel

1976-09-01
HISTORICAL
AS8015
This document defines the minimum performance standards for personnel parachute assemblies to be carried in aircraft or worn by passengers, crew, or parachutists for emergency use. This document covers three types of personnel carrying parachute assemblies and the operating limitations for each.
Standard

Minimum Performance Standard for Parachute Assemblies and Components, Personnel

1982-09-01
HISTORICAL
AS8015A
This document defines the minimum performance standards for personnel parachute assemblies to be carried in aircraft or worn by passengers, crew, or parachutists for emergency use. This document covers three types of personnel carrying parachute assemblies and the operating limitations for each.
Standard

MINIMUM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR PARACHUTE ASSEMBLIES AND COMPONENTS, PERSONNEL

1992-07-07
CURRENT
AS8015B
This document defines the minimum performance standards for personnel parachute assemblies to be carried in aircraft or worn by passengers, crew, or parachutists for emergency use. This document covers three types of personnel carrying parachute assemblies and the operating limitations for each:
Standard

Life-Support Systems for Manned Spacecraft

1965-09-01
HISTORICAL
AIR733
This report was prepared to provide a summary of the first ten years, 1958 to 1968, of work performed on life-support systems for manned spacecraft. Members of the preparing committee and other life-support specialists reviewed all of the literature published on this subject before 1969, and agreed that the references cited herein present the best data available on each of the techniques or processes devised for life support. Tables are presented to indicate the type of data contained in each reference - i.e., descriptive, analytical, experimental and/or development data. In addition, discussions are presented on the past, present and future state-of-the-art of each subsystem. Thus, this report should be useful in training new personnel and avoiding the duplication of work performed in the past.
Standard

Identification and Implementation of Global Standardization Opportunities in the Commercial Jet Transport Industry

1999-03-01
CURRENT
ARP5400
This document provides guidelines for consolidation and standardization of commercial jet transport parts, materials, and processes currently defined by two or more company or industry standards. Included in this ARP are processes for selecting and evaluating standardization opportunities as well as a procedure for initiating the development and release of global aerospace industry standards. These practices are intended to be used when two or more company standards appear to have significant overlap or in fact be technically identical. Benefits of such standardization efforts include part numbers and potentially reduced inventory levels, reduced errors, reduced qualification costs, and reduced equipment life cycle costs. This ARP is intended to be used by any two or more companies involved in the aerospace industry that wish to benefit from standardization.
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