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Standard

The Preparation and Use of Chromel-Alumel Thermocouples for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

2011-11-05
WIP
AIR46C
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) reviews the precautions which must be taken and the corrections which must be evaluated and applied if the experimental error in measuring the temperature of a hot gas stream with a thermocouple is to be kept to a practicable minimum. Discussions will focus on Type K thermocouples. These are defined in NBS Monograph 125 as nickel-chromium alloy versus nickel-aluminum alloy thermocouples.
Standard

The Preparation and Use of Chromel-Alumel Thermocouples for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

1996-11-01
CURRENT
AIR46B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) reviews the precautions that must be taken and the corrections which must be evaluated and applied if the experimental error in measuring the temperature of a hot gas stream with a thermocouple is to be kept to a practicable minimum. Discussions will focus on Type K thermocouples. These are defined in NBS Monograph 125 as nickel-chromium alloy versus nickel-aluminum alloy thermocouples.
Standard

Software Interfaces for Ground-Based Monitoring Systems

2001-09-01
HISTORICAL
AS4831
To establish a specification for software input and output interfaces for condition monitoring and performance programs used to monitor equipment from multiple manufacturers. The purpose of standardizing these interfaces is to improve operational flexibility and efficiency of monitoring systems as an aid to cost effectiveness (e.g., easier implementation).
Standard

Propulsion System Monitoring for Continued Airworthiness

2020-04-24
WIP
ARP6835
The SAE E-32 Committee is requested to develop standards for Commercial Aircraft Engine Monitoring to support the Continued Airworthiness of aircraft in general, with particular emphasis on the ETOPS (Extended Operations) to support the regulations. 14CFR A33.3 (c) ETOPS Requirements. For an applicant seeking eligibility for an engine to be installed on an airplane approved for ETOPS, the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness must include procedures for engine condition monitoring. The engine condition monitoring procedures must be able to determine prior to flight, whether an engine is capable of providing, within approved engine operating limits, maximum continuous power or thrust, bleed air, and power extraction required for a relevant engine inoperative diversion. For an engine to be installed on a two-engine airplane approved for ETOPS, the engine condition monitoring procedures must be validated before ETOPS eligibility is granted.
Standard

Prognostics for Gas Turbine Engines

2008-06-09
HISTORICAL
AIR5871
This document applies to prognostics of gas turbine engines and its related auxiliary and subsystems. Its purpose is to define the meaning of prognostics with regard to gas turbine engines and related subsystems, explain its potential and limitations, and to provide guidelines for potential approaches for use in existing condition monitoring environments. It also includes some examples.
Standard

Prognostics for Aerospace Propulsion Systems

2020-10-14
CURRENT
AIR5871A
This document applies to prognostics of aerospace propulsion systems. Its purpose is to define the meaning of prognostics in this context, explain their potential and limitations, and to provide guidelines for potential approaches for use in existing condition monitoring environments. This document also includes some examples. The current revision does not provide specific guidance on validation and verification, nor does it address implementation aspects such as computational capability or certification.
Standard

Prognostic Metrics for Engine Health Management Systems

2016-02-26
CURRENT
AIR5909
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents metrics for assessing the performance of prognostic algorithms applied for Engine Health Management (EHM) functions. The emphasis is entirely on prognostics and as such is intended to provide an extension and complement to such documents as AIR5871, which offers information and guidance on general prognostic approaches relevant to gas turbines, and AIR4985 which offers general metrics for evaluating diagnostic systems and their impact on engine health management activities.
Standard

Lessons Learned from Developing, Implementing, and Operating a Health Management System for Propulsion and Drive Train Systems

2011-01-03
CURRENT
AIR1871C
SAE Aerospace Information Report AIR1871 provides valuable insight into lessons learned in the development, implementation, and operation of various health monitoring systems for propulsion engines and drive train systems. This document provides an overview of the lessons learned for ground-based systems, oil debris monitoring systems, lubrication systems, and Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) for military and commercial programs. For each case study, this document presents a brief technical description, the design requirements, accomplishments, lessons learned, and future recommendations. The lessons learned presented in this document represent a fragment of the knowledge gained through experience when developing and implementing a propulsion health management system. Previous versions of this document contain additional lessons learned during the 1980’s and 1990’s that may be of additional value to the reader.
Standard

Lessons Learned from Developing, Implementing, and Operating a Health Management System for Propulsion and Drive Train Systems

2018-04-05
WIP
AIR1871D
SAE Aerospace Information Report AIR1871 provides valuable insight into lessons learned in the development, implementation, and operation of various health monitoring systems for propulsion engines and drive train systems. This document provides an overview of the lessons learned for ground-based systems, oil debris monitoring systems, lubrication systems, and Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) for military and commercial programs. For each case study, this document presents a brief technical description, the design requirements, accomplishments, lessons learned, and future recommendations. The lessons learned presented in this document represent a fragment of the knowledge gained through experience when developing and implementing a propulsion health management system. Previous versions of this document contain additional lessons learned during the 1980’s and 1990’s that may be of additional value to the reader.
Standard

Guidelines for Integration of Engine Monitoring Functions With On-Board Aircraft Systems

1996-06-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4061A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) discusses physical and functional integration of main engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) monitoring with other on-board systems. It includes General Considerations, Parameter Selection and Requirements, Signal Sources, Signal Conditioning, Data Processing, Data Storage, and Data Retrieval. Engine monitoring hardware and software are discussed so that they may be properly considered in an integrated design. Civil and military aviation applications are included and delineated where requirements differ.
Standard

Guidelines for Integrating Typical Engine Health Management Functions Within Aircraft Systems

2008-02-14
HISTORICAL
AIR4061B
SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) 4061 provides best practice guidelines for the integration of Engine Health Management (EHM) system functions within aircraft systems to include both its main engine(s) and any Auxiliary Power Unit(s) (APU). This document provides an overview of some of the functions EHM typically integrates, offers some system variations encountered with different aircraft, and suggests general considerations involved with integration. It presents a sample EHM parameter coverage matrix to show the types of parameters with which a typical EHM system might interface, offers insight into signal and data processing and retrieval, and offers a view of typical EHM parameter requirements by function. Where practical, this document delineates between military and commercial practices.
Standard

Guide to Temperature Monitoring in Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

2010-10-06
WIP
AIR1900B
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides an overview of temperature measurement for engine monitoring systems in various areas of aircraft gas turbine engines while focusing on current usage and methods, systems, selection criteria, and types of hardware. This document emphasizes temperature monitoring for diagnostics and condition monitoring purposes. The purpose of this AIR is to provide information and guidance on the selection and use of aircraft turbine engine temperature monitoring systems and elements.
Standard

Guide to Temperature Monitoring in Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

1997-11-01
CURRENT
AIR1900A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides an overview of temperature measurement for engine monitoring systems in various areas of aircraft gas turbine engines while focusing on current usage and methods, systems, selection criteria, and types of hardware. This document emphasizes temperature monitoring for diagnostics and condition monitoring purposes.
Standard

Guide to Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

1998-05-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1872A
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This document addresses the following areas: a Safety b Life-limiting criteria c Life usage algorithm development d Data acquisition and management e Parts life tracking f Design feedback g Cost effectiveness It primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, and considers the potential impact of new technology to the following areas: a Parts classification and control requirements b Failure causes of life-limited parts c Engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques d Method validation e Parts life usage data management f Lessons learned g Life usage tracking benefits
Standard

Guide to Engine Lubrication System Monitoring

2005-06-27
HISTORICAL
AIR1828B
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of lubrication system monitoring methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices that can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance.
Standard

Guide to Engine Lubrication System Monitoring

2018-04-10
CURRENT
AIR1828C
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides information and guidance for the selection and use of technologies and methods for lubrication system monitoring of gas turbine aircraft engines. This AIR describes technologies and methods covering oil system performance monitoring, oil debris monitoring, and oil condition monitoring. Both on-aircraft and off-aircraft applications are presented. A higher-level view of lubrication system monitoring as part of an overall engine monitoring system (EMS), is discussed in ARP1587. The scope of this document is limited to those lubrication system monitoring, inspection and analysis methods and devices that can be considered appropriate for health monitoring and routine maintenance. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard.
Standard

GUIDELINES FOR INTEGRATION OF ENGINE MONITORING FUNCTIONS WITH ON-BOARD AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

1990-01-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4061
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) discusses physical and functional integration of main engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) monitoring with other on-board systems. It includes General Considerations, Parameter Selection and Requirements, Signal Sources, Signal Conditioning, Data Processing, Data Storage, and Data Retrieval. Engine monitoring hardware and software are discussed so that they may be properly considered in an integrated design. Civil and military aviation applications are included and delineated where requirements differ.
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