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Standard

Twin Engine Helicopter Power Requirements

1997-06-01
CURRENT
AIR1850A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) defines the power spectrum during normal and emergency operations of a twin engine helicopter and thereby postulates suitable power plant rating structures. This document does not address the power requirements for single engine helicopters or those with more than two engines.
Standard

The Effect of Installation Power Losses on the Overall Performance of a Helicopter

2005-06-07
CURRENT
AIR5642
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to illustrate the effect of installation power losses on the performance of a helicopter. Installation power losses result from a variety of sources, some associated directly with the basic engine installation, and some coming from the installation of specific items of aircraft mission specific equipment. Close attention must be paid to the accurate measurement of these losses so that the correct aircraft performance is calculated. Installation power losses inevitably result in a reduction in the overall performance of the aircraft. In some cases, careful attention to detail will allow specific elements of the overall loss to be reduced with immediate benefit for the mission performance of the aircraft. When considering items of equipment that affect the engine, it is important to understand the effect these will have on overall aircraft performance to ensure that mission capability is not unduly compromised.
Standard

TURBINE DRIVE SHAFT CONNECTION

1970-03-15
CURRENT
ARP721
This ARP applies to turbine engines that are to be used in helicopters. It provides the engine designer guide lines in achieving a satisfactory turbine engine drive shaft connection.
Standard

Performance of Low Pressure Ratio Ejectors for Engine Nacelle Cooling

1999-03-01
CURRENT
AIR1191A
A general method for the preliminary design of a single, straight-sided, low subsonic ejector is presented. The method is based on the information presented in References 1, 2, 3, and 4, and utilizes analytical and empirical data for the sizing of the ejector mixing duct diameter and flow length. The low subsonic restriction applies because compressibility effects were not included in the development of the basic design equations. The equations are restricted to applications where Mach numbers within the ejector primary or secondary flow paths are equal to or less than 0.3.
Standard

Helicopter Mission Definition

1982-11-01
CURRENT
ARP1352
The purpose of this recommended practice is to establish a standard format for the presentation of helicopter mission data, which will provide data required to establish airframe and/or engine component life.
Standard

Helicopter Engine Foreign Object Damage

2019-01-28
WIP
AIR4096A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report is to disseminate qualitative information regarding foreign object damage (FOD) to gas turbine engines used to power helicopters and to discuss methods of preventing FOD. Although turbine-powered, fixed-wing aircraft are also subject to FOD, the unique ability of the helicopter to hover above, takeoff from, and land on unprepared areas creates a special need for a separate treatment of this subject as applied to rotary-winged aircraft.
Standard

HELICOPTER ENGINE FOREIGN OBJECT DAMAGE

1989-11-30
CURRENT
AIR4096
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report is to disseminate qualitative information regarding foreign object damage (FOD) to gas turbine engines used to power helicopters and to discuss methods of preventing FOD. Although turbine-powered, fixed-wing aircraft are also subject to FOD, the unique ability of the helicopter to hover above, takeoff from, and land on unprepared areas creates a special need for a separate treatment of this subject as applied to rotary-winged aircraft.
Standard

ENGINE EXHAUST SYSTEM DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR ROTORCRAFT

1989-10-01
CURRENT
ARP4056
Turbine engines installed in rotorcraft have an exhaust system that is designed and produced by the aircraft manufacturer. The primary function of the exhaust system is to direct hot exhaust gases away from the airframe. The exhaust system may consist of a tailpipe, which is attached to the engine, and an exhaust fairing, which is part of the rotorcraft. The engine manufacturer specifies a baseline "referee" tailpipe design, and guaranteed engine performance is based upon the use of the referee tailpipe and tailpipe exit diameter. The configuration used on the rotocraft may differ from the referee tailpipe, but it is intended to minimize additional losses attributed to the installation. This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes the physical, functional, and performance interfaces to be considered in the design of the aircraft exhaust system.
Standard

Air Bleed Objective for Helicopter Turbine Engines

1997-05-01
CURRENT
AIR984C
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) defines the helicopter bleed air requirements which may be obtained through compressor extraction and is intended as a guide to engine designers.
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